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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

They Live by Night (http://mubi.com/films/they-live-by-night)

Synopsis:
A thematic follow-up to You Only Live Once andforerunner to Bonnie And Clyde, They Live By Night is a nightmare tourof American society – drab, mercenary, and insanely competitive – thatbegins with a prison break and follows the hopeless flight of abewildered young “criminal” (Farley Granger) and the woman he meets onthe road (Cathy O’Donnell). The tenderness of the love story in TheyLive By Night contrasts sharply with the noir elements of the genre, andgives rise to the special lyricism of the film and its socialconsciousness as an indictment of a world too cruel and unjust forinnocents like Keechie and Bowie. Already in this astonishing firstfilm, Ray’s style is as striking in its compactness and expressivemise-en-scene, as it is personal in its peculiar nervousness andintegration to a decidedly modern, existential view of individualalienation and social determinants. —BAM/PFA

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Pushover (http://mubi.com/films/pushover)

Synopsis:
A tough 50s crime melodrama in which the lines between cops and robbers, good guys and bad, are anything but distinct. Fred MacMurray leads a gang of cops assigned to track down a fugitive bank thief via the thief’s mistress (Kim Novak), whom they stalk with tape recorder and binoculars. MacMurray, lured by the money and the mistress, does away with the thief, but not in the name of duty. Starting out deceptively slow, the film rises to a high-pitched tension. —J.B.

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

You Only Live Once (http://mubi.com/films/you-only-live-once)

Synopsis:
Possibly Fritz Lang’s best American film, You Only Live Once is certainly the first and best of the Bonnie and Clyde type films of young-couples-on-the-run. The story tells of Eddie (Henry Fonda), a three-time loser who is imprisoned and sentenced to death for a crime he did not commit. Escaping from prison, he flees across the country with his girlfriend Jo (Sylvia Sydney) to a gripping and uncompromising conclusion at the Canadian border. According to historian Georges Sadoul, “This and Fury are Fritz Lang’s best Hollywood films, and expositions of Lang’s favorite theme of guilt. As in Fury it is society not destiny that is responsible, but whereas in Fury Lang focused blame on the mob, here society’s guilt is more diffuse. Visually striking, the composition and lighting, in their brooding, atmospheric effects, sometimes recall those of expressionism. Though its plot is largely melodramatic, the total effect of the film (much helped by the touching warmth of Sylvia Sydney and Fonda) is very powerful.” —BAM/PFA

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Marc Rothemund (http://mubi.com/cast_members/29502)

Biography:
Marc Rothemund, born in 1968, comes from a Munich ”film family“. His grandfather, Siegfried Rothemund, was the producer of Siro-Musik and head of press for Das Maedchen Rosemarie (1958); Marc Rothemund began his professional career as assistant director to Helmut Dietl (for ROSSINI), Bernd Eichinger (for ‘Das Mädchen Rosemarie’, a remake of his grandfather’s classic), Dominik Graf (for ‘Sperling’) and Gérard Corbiau (for FARINELLI). In 1998 he obtained the Bavarian Film Prize as best young director for his first feature film DAS MERKWÜRDIGE VERHALTEN GESCHLECHTSREIFER GROSSSTÄDTER ZUR PAARUNGSZEIT (‘Love Scenes from Planet Earth’). With 1.7 million spectators, his second feature HARTE JUNGS (‘Just the Two of Us’) was one of the most successful films of 1999. His TV thriller ‘Das Duo – Der Liebhaber’ won the VFF TV Movie Award in 2003.

With SOPHIE SCHOLL-THE FINAL DAYS, Marc Rothemund continues his successful collaboration with screenwriter Fred Breinersdorfer, which was launched in 1997 with two episodes of the ZDF thriller series ‘Anwalt Abel’ (both awarded the Telestar) and reached a high point with the TV movie ‘Die Hoffnung stirbt zuletzt’ (2002). This gripping drama about the fateful bullying of a policewoman obtained many awards, including the Golden Camera and the Grimme Prize in Gold.

SOPHIE SCHOLL–THE FINAL DAYS has been invited to over two dozen festivals worldwide and has collected numerous awards including the Silver Bear for the Best Direction and Best Actress and the main prize from the Ecumenical Jury at the 2005 Berlinale, the Bernhard Wicki Filmpreis ”Die Bruecke – Der Friedenspreis des Deutschen Films“, and German Film Awards (Lolas) for the Best Film (Silver) and the Audience Award 2005. It will be the opening night film for the Made in Germany section of the AFI Festival in Los Angeles, and the closing night selection for the New Films from Germany series at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. SOPHIE SCHOLL – THE FINAL DAYS has been honored as Germany’s Official Selection for the 78th Academy Awards. —Zeitgeist Films

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Johannes Suhm (new cast entry)

Biography:
Johannes Suhm is born in 1977 in Offenburg/Baden.
After years in Berlin, Paris and Vienna, he studied from 2000 to 2004 acting at the Otto Falckenberg Schule in Munich.
During his education he already started playing in movies.
From summer 2004 until 2006 he was a member of the new formed theatre group of potsdam, which he left in 2006. Since then he decided to focus on the work in front of the camera.
He resides in Berlin. —Official site

Add him as a cast member of:
Sophie Scholl: The Final Days (http://mubi.com/films/sophie-scholl-the-final-days)
The Baader Meinhof Complex (http://mubi.com/films/the-baader-meinhof-complex)

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Scattered Clouds (http://mubi.com/films/scattered-clouds)

Synopsis:
Naruse was already aware that he was dying when he made this deeply moving drama about a young woman haunted by her husband’s death in a car accident. She at first refuses to forgive the driver of the car, who approaches her in sincere contrition. After the two meet again by chance in Hokkaido, a fated bond slowly grows between them, although the past continues to cast its long shadow. Phillip Lopate called this “one of [Naruse’s] strangest and strongest. It is eerie to see how well his style worked inside the mode of the late sixties; how curiously modernist it looks in CinemaScope, with its cool, restrained colors and spare compositions; how suitable his theme was to the age of alienation, though it is only Naruse’s old song: that people keep scheming to get a little of what they want in a world designed for unhappiness.” —BAM/PFA

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Daughters, Wives, and a Mother (http://mubi.com/films/daughters-wives-and-a-mother)

Synopsis:
The writer and critic Susan Sontag was a great admirer of this drama about a middle-class Tokyo family thrown into crisis by a car accident and an insurance windfall. A splendid cast (including the redoubtable Tatsuya Nakadai) carries off a film of narrative complexity, appropriately shot in CinemaScope. Chris Fujiwara wrote in Film Comment: “[This] is another film in which Naruse compares the ideal of life—what the characters suppose themselves to be living—with its reality. . . . Again and again in Naruse’s films, the internal coherence of the family is an illusion that’s exposed the moment a crisis loosens the bonds among the family members (instead of doing what people like to believe a crisis does, bringing them together).” —BAM/PFA

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Pit Stop (http://mubi.com/films/pit-stop)

Synopsis:
Combining the speed of oval track and the heavy-metal crunch of demo derby, figure-8 racing is a perfect contemporary metaphor. Round and round you go, then wham, you’re out of the race. Jack Hill’s shearing Pit Stop follows the syncro-story of Rick Bowman (Dick Davalos), a smoldering street racer who wants to go legit. Under the tutelage of track promoter Grant Willard (Brian Donlevy), jelly-rolled rebel Rick gets into the fiery fray, taking on Hawk Sidney (Sid Haig), the reigning maniac of figure-8. Smoothed by constant velocity, Rick has a taciturn simplicity-he has to get somewhere and fast cars are his vehicle. Better known for Spider Baby and Foxy Brown, director Hill collides a high-speed lust for life-the drunken revelry, the flailing fist fights, the craven couplings-with body-bending action at Ascot Park in Los Angeles. Shot in stark B&W, Pit Stop is a nonstop crack-up, literally, with more mangled wrecks than a Cronenberg film. —Steve Seid

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

The Swinging Cheerleaders (http://mubi.com/films/the-swinging-cheerleaders)

Synopsis:
At Mesa State, the cheerleading squad is a femme fiefdom. Using just what God gave them, a miniskirt and a huge set of pom–poms, these comely nymphets captivate their fawning fans by turning cartwheels into slo–mo fantasies. This campus carnality riles Kate, a rad feminist working with the underground press. “What is the most exploitative, demeaning activity on campus?” she asks her activist beau. Her plan contains the answer: she’ll go undercover as a cheerleading hopeful. When she qualifies for the bod squad, Kate enters an all–American scene of reluctant virgins and amped pigskinners. Excessive seventies mod decor provides the backdrop for the hormonal squabbles in this jock jackpot that includes a scandal going all the way to the alumni association. Not politically inclined, director Jack Hill, who brought us Switchblade Sisters and Foxy Brown, wasn’t out to expose anything beyond a few nubile bodies, which he does with sophomoric flair. —Steve Seid

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Foxy Brown (http://mubi.com/films/foxy-brown)

Synopsis:
Pam Grier is the angel of vigilante justice out to stop a major heroin shipment from reaching her neighborhood and to avenge her boyfriend’s murder. Her arsenal is largely personal. On the occasion of PFA’s Blaxploitation’s Back! series in 1995, Chuck Stephens wrote in the Bay Guardian, “A fiery fellatrix…Grier’s generosity in going down on her lovers is as consistent as her discomforting propensity for castrating her corrupt captors and romantic deceivers at the melodramas’ climax. As handy with a shotgun as she is with a silly straw, Grier exudes fleshy, abundant oblivion, and she gives so much better than she gets.” —BAM/PFA

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Born to Kill (http://mubi.com/films/born-to-kill)

Synopsis:
A complicated noir-melodrama about a morose, murderous kind of guy (Lawrence Tierney) who marries an insecure woman for her money but can’t keep his thoughts off her sister (Claire Trevor). The feeling is mutual. One of Wise’s most admired noirs, Born to Kill found a place in critic Manny Farber’s book Negative Space, among the “Underground Films”: “The terrorizing of a dowdy, middle-aged, frog-faced woman that starts in a decrepit hotel and ends in a bumbling, screeching, crawling murder at midnight on the shore. For his big shock effect, director Robert Wise…uses the angle going down to the water to create a middle-class mediocrity that out-horrors anything Graham Greene attempted in his early books on small-time gunsels.” And Andrew Sarris called the film “a revelation…the most Nietzschean of all American film noir. The unyieldingly malevolent character played by Lawrence Tierney makes no sense except as a projection of Claire Trevor’s evil desires.” —BAM/PFA

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Blood on the Moon (http://mubi.com/films/blood-on-the-moon)

Synopsis:
Wise’s critically acclaimed Western predicted by two decades the darkly existential swing the genre would take in the late 1960s. Wise used his Val Lewton sensibilities to create the closest thing to film noir the Western had seen yet: terse, realistic, moody, and moonlit. (Cinematography is by the great noir cameraman Nicholas Musuraca.) Robert Mitchum stars as a taciturn would-be cattleman who wanders into a struggle between homesteaders and ranchers, a battle manipulated by ruthless cattle rustler Robert Preston. Barbara Bel Geddes is the wildcat defender of the range (and not the kitchen kind), who steers cowpoke Mitchum toward his conscience. Mitchum gives one of his better if little known performances, and Wise creates an action film that, like its hero, is deceptively laconic. Memorable scenes include a long chase across snow-covered mountains, and a climactic barroom confrontation that outdoes itself for menacing effect. —BAM/PFA

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Odds Against Tomorrow (http://mubi.com/films/odds-against-tomorrow)

Synopsis:
This exciting caper is film noir on the cusp of two decades. Shot at night in black and white and set to a gritty jazz track, it delves into the depths of human greed and self-destruction that laced the fifties crime melodrama with despair. But it also plays the odds on tomorrow by predicting the intensified brutality of the sixties films, and the socially conscious variants on the crime drama that the decade would produce-films about racial conflicts, psychopathic killers, etc. Robert Ryan, one of film noir’s dark giants, for better or for worse is often at his best when playing the bigot (as in Crossfire). Here, he is a southern drifter whose hatred of blacks is focused on his partner-in-crime, Harry Belafonte, a Harlem musician. Shelley Winters is in her element as Ryan’s girlfriend, but it is Gloria Grahame who culminates a decade of fatalistic femmes when she asks Ryan to excite her by describing what it’s like to kill a man. Correction: The screenplay for Odds Against Tomorrow was written by blacklisted writer Abraham Polonsky [uncredited] and Nelson Gidding. —BAM/PFA

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

The Set-Up (http://mubi.com/films/the-set-up)

Synopsis:
A superb film noir and one of the great boxing films of all time. Robert Ryan (who was an amateur boxer himself) gives a canny performance as an aging middleweight who spoils a racketeer’s arrangement for a fix by insisting on a win despite fierce punishment in the ring from his younger opponent. Audrey Totter is his wife, as desperate for an end to the boxing life as her husband is for redemption in the ring. Inspired by a jazz-age poem by Joseph Moncure March (“Cheap seats, the crowd was rough/ None of your high-hat Gershwin stuff”), the film itself is a bruising bit of American poetry, from the bleak town with its Cozy Hotel and I Dream Cafe, to the vicious gangster named Little Boy and the spectator who constantly shouts “Kill him! Kill him!” —BAM/PFA

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

I Want to Live (http://mubi.com/films/i-want-to-live)

Synopsis:
Party girl Barbara Graham [was] a fairly small-time grifter who did what she could for a buck, including prostitution and aiding her boyfriends in robberies and various hustles. She went to the chair for a murder she vehemently denied having committed…leaving her small child motherless and Susan Hayward the opportunity to tear up the screen in a highly sympathetic performance. The movie captures the spirit of the 1950s…in vivid black-and-white with which director Robert Wise was a master… Hayward reflected perfectly the glamorous but shaky character of a woman in transition, not knowing quite what she’s doing or where she’s going, behaving alternately tough and vulnerable while retaining the vanities expected of a good-looking gal. As Barbara Graham, the necessity of a another lifetime in order to get it right fits the Hayward profile. If ever there was a woman’s movie made in the fifties, this is it. —Barry Gifford

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Constanze Becker (http://mubi.com/cast_members/225617)

Maria Hofstätter (http://mubi.com/cast_members/75456)

Stefanie Japp (http://mubi.com/cast_members/156707)

Eva Meckbach (http://mubi.com/cast_members/350999)

Elisabeth Orth (http://mubi.com/cast_members/71799)

Annette Paulmann (http://mubi.com/cast_members/202056)

Yulia Peresild (http://mubi.com/cast_members/160658)

Gertrud Roll (http://mubi.com/cast_members/313997)

Hildegard Schmahl (http://mubi.com/cast_members/151862)

Katharina Schmidt (http://mubi.com/cast_members/75727)

Joel Basman (http://mubi.com/cast_members/116191)

Robert Beyer (http://mubi.com/cast_members/174949)

Gerd Böckmann (http://mubi.com/cast_members/195082)

Simon Eckert (http://mubi.com/cast_members/133695)

Sebastian Fischer (http://mubi.com/cast_members/343304)

Georg Friedrich (http://mubi.com/cast_members/15248)

Peter Jecklin (http://mubi.com/cast_members/141507)

Wolfgang Michael (http://mubi.com/cast_members/79580)

Michael Neuenschwander (http://mubi.com/cast_members/186306)

Cornelius Obonya (http://mubi.com/cast_members/283700)

Nicholas Ofczarek (http://mubi.com/cast_members/161006)

Michael Ostrowski (http://mubi.com/cast_members/35791)

Murali Perumal (http://mubi.com/cast_members/91852)

Denis Petkovic (http://mubi.com/cast_members/352436)

Branko Samarovski (http://mubi.com/cast_members/97970)

Klaus Schreiber (http://mubi.com/cast_members/296313)

Raimund Wallisch (http://mubi.com/cast_members/78272)

Johannes Zeiler (http://mubi.com/cast_members/313684)

Hans-Uwe Bauer (http://mubi.com/cast_members/110910)

Rufus Beck (http://mubi.com/cast_members/151106)

Jean-Yves Berteloot (http://mubi.com/cast_members/104946)

Detlev Buck (http://mubi.com/cast_members/29469)

Fabian Busch (http://mubi.com/cast_members/117637)

Jean Pierre Cornu (http://mubi.com/cast_members/204402)

Stipe Erceg (http://mubi.com/cast_members/11847)

Sascha Göpel (http://mubi.com/cast_members/183162)

Patrick Güldenberg (http://mubi.com/cast_members/152377)

Günther Maria Halmer (http://mubi.com/cast_members/108124)

Marcel Hensema (http://mubi.com/cast_members/173397)

Stefan Jürgens (http://mubi.com/cast_members/152378)

Rolf Kanies (http://mubi.com/cast_members/116011)

Burghart Klaußner (http://mubi.com/cast_members/19239)

David Kross (http://mubi.com/cast_members/15460)

Mirko Lang (http://mubi.com/cast_members/160372)

Hans Löw (http://mubi.com/cast_members/160373)

Christoph Letkowski (http://mubi.com/cast_members/186370)

Torben Liebrecht (http://mubi.com/cast_members/254533)

Carlo Ljubek (http://mubi.com/cast_members/78944)

Michael Lott (http://mubi.com/cast_members/304771)

Lars Mikkelsen (http://mubi.com/cast_members/65562)

Tilo Nest (http://mubi.com/cast_members/291461)

Tobias Oertel (http://mubi.com/cast_members/341267)

Filip Peeters (http://mubi.com/cast_members/26409)

Andreas Pietschmann (http://mubi.com/cast_members/124786)

Sven Pippig (http://mubi.com/cast_members/47266)

Janek Rieke (http://mubi.com/cast_members/133165)

Nico Rogner (http://mubi.com/cast_members/25510)

Armin Rohde (http://mubi.com/cast_members/2297)

Manuel Rubey (http://mubi.com/cast_members/108562)

Stefan Rudolf (http://mubi.com/cast_members/68328)

Clemens Schick (http://mubi.com/cast_members/178093)

Tim Seyfi (http://mubi.com/cast_members/87769)

Fedja van Huêt (http://mubi.com/cast_members/58645)

Hans-Jochen Wagner (http://mubi.com/cast_members/14326)

Jeroen Willems (http://mubi.com/cast_members/133706)

Anian Zollner (http://mubi.com/cast_members/154181)

Sólveig Arnarsdóttir (http://mubi.com/cast_members/190919)

Anna Böttcher (http://mubi.com/cast_members/194778)

Stine Fischer Christensen (http://mubi.com/cast_members/92213)

Emily Cox (http://mubi.com/cast_members/163037)

Gesine Cukrowski (http://mubi.com/cast_members/246404)

Inez Bjørg David (http://mubi.com/cast_members/337779)

Claudia Eisinger (http://mubi.com/cast_members/178436)

Karina Fallenstein (http://mubi.com/cast_members/80293)

Liane Forestieri (http://mubi.com/cast_members/304769)

Bernadette Heerwagen (http://mubi.com/cast_members/229485)

Irene Kugler (http://mubi.com/cast_members/151460)

Eva Löbau (http://mubi.com/cast_members/100859)

Alma Leiberg (http://mubi.com/cast_members/222992)

Marie Leuenberger (http://mubi.com/cast_members/130695)

Marleen Lohse (http://mubi.com/cast_members/325870)

Wanda Perdelwitz (http://mubi.com/cast_members/182331)

Lisa Maria Potthoff (http://mubi.com/cast_members/182327)

Pheline Roggan (http://mubi.com/cast_members/171467)

Michaela Rosen (http://mubi.com/cast_members/114930)

Birge Schade (http://mubi.com/cast_members/193895)

Franziska Schlattner (http://mubi.com/cast_members/219812)

Natalia Wörner (http://mubi.com/cast_members/186547)

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Please split cast entry http://mubi.com/cast_members/83030 as follows:

Francisco Domínguez (http://mubi.com/cast_members/83030)
Composer

Films:
- Doña Bárbara (http://mubi.com/films/dona-barbara)
- Wild Flower (http://mubi.com/films/wild-flower)
- Woman Without a Soul (http://mubi.com/films/woman-without-a-soul)
- María Candelaria (http://mubi.com/films/maria-candelaria)
- Hidden River ( http://mubi.com/films/hidden-river)
________________________________________________

Francisco Domínguez (new cast entry)
Cast

Film:
- Trails (http://mubi.com/films/trails)
________________________________________________

Francisco Domínguez (new cast entry)

Cinematographer

Biography:
Francisco Domínguez was born in Tucumán, Argentina, in April, 1972. While attending the Faculty of Arts at 17 he started working as a cameraman in documentaries for Unesco. He received his diploma as Art Teacher from the Faculty of Arts at the University of Tucumán and then worked in a local television station. From 1996 to 2003, he studied Cinematography at the Berlin Academy of Cinema and Television (DFFB). Under this program, he studied under renowned Directors of Photography such as Slavomir Idziak, Jost Vacano, Ciro Cappellari and Michael Ballhaus. Michael Ballhaus invited him to do an apprenticeship in the Camera Department for the film “Gangs of New York”, directed by Martin Scorsese.

Throughout his studies, he filmed several short films and documentaries. As a Cameraman and Director of Photography, he participated in the Second Unit for various feature films and made-for-television movies, including “Mein Name ist Bach”, “Anansi” and “Tatort: Freistoß”.

As Director of Photography, he has worked in various documentaries, video clips and advertising campaigns, including Nike-Berlin, Deutsche Telekom, Stabilo, Coca-Cola (Image films), Union Fenosa (Image films), ADIF-Renfe and other.

He has also worked in six feature films:
•"Cabecita Rubia" (Director: Luis Sampieri, Argentina, 2000)
•"Ein bisschen April" (Director: Asli Özge, Germany, 2003)
•"Liebeskind" (Director: Jeanette Wagner, Germany, 2005)
•"Bis in den Tod" (Director: Bernhard Semmelrock, Austria, 2005)
•"Die Überflüssigen" (Director: Aleksandra Kumorek, Germany, 2006)
•"Transf€r". This film is filmed with the camera RED ONE (Director: Damir Lukacevic, Germany, 2010)

Between 2007 and 2008, he worked as Director of Photography for the TV Series “Herederos”, broadcasted by the Spanish channel TVE-La1 (Director: Joaquín Llamas).

In this year 2010 filmed several Image Films like ADIF-RENFE and for the Archaeological Park “Campo Lameiros” in Galicia, Spain to (Image Line Productions, Madrid). He has made the Photography in two documentary films in Germany for the Canal Arte Germany/France.

He currently resides in Berlin and Madrid. —Official site

Film:
- Transfer (http://mubi.com/films/transfer)

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Bella Halben (http://mubi.com/cast_members/63421)
Cinematographer

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Florian Hoffmeister (http://mubi.com/cast_members/129689)
Cinematographer

Biography:
Having studied directing and cinematography at Berlin´s German Film and Television Academy (dffb) Florian Hoffmeister quickly established himself as a cinematographer in Germany´s vibrant art house film scene. He shot award winning films such as “Berlin is in Germany“, “One Day in Europe“ and “Learning to Lie” (Best Cinematography, Brooklyn International Filmfestival) and worked for companies such as Tom Tykwer`s X-Filme. That body of work brought him to the attention of Bristish director Antonia Bird, who hired him to shoot “Hamburg Cell“, the critically acclaimed tv film about the terrorist attacks on 09/11.

In 2005 he took a break from cinematography to realize his directorial debut “3 degrees colder“, which won him a „Silver Leopard for best first feature“ at the Locarno International Filmfestival.

Shortly after he re-teamed with Antonia Bird to lense a resurrection of “Cracker“, Britains famous TV-series starring Robbie Coltrane. He then expanded his work in the UK, serving as a director of photography on acclaimed international tv projects such as “5 Days“ (nominated for the 2008 Golden Globe), “House of Saddam“ (2009 BAFTA Nomination Best Photography Fiction), and AMC´s remake of “The Prisoner“ (2010 EMMY Nomination Best Cinematography Miniseries or Movie).

In 2009 he decided to devote more time to commercials and music promos where he has since been working with directors Saam Farahmand, Kim Gehrig, Samantha Morton, Lynn Ramsay, Walter Stern and Daniel Wolfe. Furthermore he continued his collaboration with writer / director Tony Grisoni by photographing two more shorts for him since their success with “Kingsland – the dreamer“ (2009 BAFTA Nomination Best Short Film).

In 2010 he returned to the big screen: “The Deep Blue Sea“ which he shot for British director Terence Davies stared Rachel Weisz and was successfully released in November 2011.
Shortly after his most recent work also saw it’s transmission: Charles Dickens’ “Great Expectations“ was this year’s highly acclaimed christmas special on BBC1. —Official site

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

And once again, please get rid of all the films listed here:
http://mubi.com/cast_members/310878

Sometimes I feel like I’m talking to a brick wall!

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Cimarron (http://mubi.com/films/cimarron—2)

Synopsis:
“Sometimes the given name of an American movie is less instructive than its French title. Cimarron, in 1960 the last Western ever made by Anthony Mann, one of the genre’s masters, is known in France as La Ruée vers l’Ouest: The Rush Towards the West. Of course, it had to be Cimarron here, to honor the 1930 original (starring Richard Dix) as well as the Edna Ferber novel. But Mann’s Cimarron is about a man who is happiest when leading a rush, and never convinced that the rush has reached its true and lasting destination. “Early on in the picture there is the historically accurate and cinematically phenomenal land-rush scene as the rolling, bare plains of Oklahoma become the site of a race for every imaginable horse-drawn transport. At the head of the race is Yancey Cravat, an adventurer with a conscience, but a wanderer too who will move on to Alaska and Cuba, leaving the new society to be built up by his wife, who takes over his job of newspaper proprietor. In showing the growth of Western community—the building and the organizing—Cimarron depicts the active hero as a chronic escapist, doomed to exist in the warm light of story-telling, never quite settled. And as it comes from Edna Ferber, so Cimarron teaches us that Giant was a Western too, a Western about a woman who began the domestication of the range so that it would be ready for Dallas and The Yellow Rose.” David Thomson —BAM/PFA

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

The Dark Past (http://mubi.com/films/the-dark-past)

Synopsis:
Held hostage in a lakeside cabin by a pathological thug, Al Walker (William Holden), and his criminal cohorts, Dr. Collins (Lee J. Cobb) overwhelms the notorious killer using a single weapon, a book entitled “The Criminal Mind and Insanity.” A criminal psychologist, Dr. Collins launches this remake of 1939’s Blind Alley with a sober voice-over about saving society’s less fortunate; then, with implacable cool, the pipe-puffing shrink calmly unravels the nightmare that has plagued wacko Walker, a nightmare visualized in artfully reversed imagery, surely the inspiration of director Maté, the master lensman behind The Passion of Joan of Arc and others. In this taut siege, the claustrophobic cabin becomes the hemmed-in equivalent of a compressed Freudian psychology that includes a helpful lecture on how the conscious and unconscious minds are separated by a “censor band.” When The Dark Past dissolves that band, the emitted light is blinding. —Steve Seid

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

High Wall (http://mubi.com/films/high-wall)

Synopsis:
Found unconscious behind the wheel of his wrecked car, his strangled wife beside him, Steve Kenet (in a role tailor-made for Robert Taylor) quickly confesses to murdering his two-timing spouse. Then the seemingly simple case crumbles: Steve, a highly decorated WWII pilot, has had brain surgery for a combat injury, the result being periods of blackout. Is he hiding behind his hematoma? Or is he the genuine damaged goods? A short sojourn at the Hamelin County Psychiatric Hospital should reveal the secret of his psyche. There, Steve is put under the care of Dr. Ann (the warmly aloof Audrey Totter), who comes to believe in his innocence. Written by Sydney Boehm, who would soon script Fritz Lang’s The Big Heat and Anthony Mann’s Side Street, and Lester Cole, a member of “The Hollywood Ten” in the last days of his career, High Wall has all the symptoms of a neurotic noir, especially Taylor’s vulnerable vet, dogged by his own desire for redemption, and the bevy of shrinks prognosticating personality disorders. Smothered by taunting shadows, the psychiatric hospital is a bedlam of the binned and broken, confining our unreliable recollector as he withstands several murderous flashbacks. “Psychiatry can never tell me what I must find out,” Dr. Ann tells her brooding pilot. That is the heart of the matter. —Steve Seid

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Criss Cross (http://mubi.com/films/criss-cross)

Synopsis:
Women and armored cars are a volatile combination: both are seemingly impenetrable. And so it is in Criss Cross as a heist involving both is in the offing and betrayal seems the more likely reward. “From the beginning, it all went one way. It was in the cards, or it was fate, or a jinx, or whatever you want to call it,” says a resigned Steve Thompson (Burt Lancaster), a driver for Horten’s Armored Car Service who has just returned to L.A. after a two-year drift. The reason for his flight is a heart battered by Anna (Yvonne De Carlo), his calculating former wife and now the mate of mobster Slim Dundee (Dan Duryea), a shrill thug who’s all over her like a bad rash. Director Siodmak places this triangulated story of crosses both purposeful and double in a cramped slice of Los Angeles, a flophouse on Bunker Hill, a sliver of a dim bar, the vertiginous Angel’s Flight funicular. Just as the memory of Anna has permeated Steve’s consciousness, the city’s presence is an inescapable reminder of life’s appalling indifference. Shot from a lofty point of view, the boldly rendered robbery has the crooks wandering through a smoke-filled street like lost inhabitants of limbo. Fatality hangs over Criss Cross like a thickening mist. For love-weary Steve Thompson, it’s the air he breathes. —Steve Seid

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Where the Sidewalk Ends (http://mubi.com/films/where-the-sidewalk-ends)

Synopsis:
Mark Dixon (Dana Andrews) don’t take no guff. Get in his face, cross him, and things happen, bad things. Trouble is he’s a cop, a tough cop who’s lost his balance. He’s got no room for ambiguity. It’s either right or wrong. Then he crosses the line: rousting a suspect, Dixon accidentally kills him, then covers it up. As luck would have it, Dixon’s lax lieutenant (Karl Malden) assigns him the case and so he points an incriminating finger at a local thug, Tommy Scalise (Gary Merrill), for the dirty deed. Unlike Laura, Whirlpool, or Angel Face, Otto Preminger’s darkly lit Sidewalk leads to a strictly working class neighborhood, the grim brownstones of lower Manhattan. The son of a “thief,” Dixon has been running from his past and finding little that isn’t morally suspect, except for the delicately naïve Morgan (Gene Tierney), daughter of a cab driver. “Innocent people can get into terrible jams,” he tells her, getting to the dark heart of a world where crooks and cops sup at the same table. Ben Hecht’s stark script delineates Dixon as a man of dubious virtue in a gritty milieu where integrity reels like a punch-drunk heavy. “What did they hit you with?” asks Morgan when a bruised Dixon arrives at her door. “Various objects,” he replies with weary resignation. —Steve Seid

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Shockproof (http://mubi.com/films/shockproof)

Synopsis:
Sam Fuller’s original script might have been called All That Heaven Should Allow. It’s a noir that stumbled out of a dark alley and into the harsh light of melodrama, Douglas Sirk’s beat. Griff (Cornel Wilde) is a tough parole officer until he’s assigned the curvaceous ex-con Jenny (Patricia Knight), a bleached bombshell whose backstory is a “swill pile.” Griff sees past the swill to the swell beneath. “You’ve got to change your brand of men,” he demands, and goes about rebranding himself. When Griff and Jenny take it on the lam, Sirk takes the film back from Fuller’s brush and makes it his own, complete with the fugitive lovers working the oil fields in a setting made for Rock and Dorothy. Originally titled The Lovers, this eccentric melo-noir rewards time off for bad behavior. —Steve Seid

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Dark City (http://mubi.com/films/dark-city—2)

Synopsis:
“Low and lurid,” said New York Times reviewer Bosley Crowther of Dark City. Was he praising with faint damns? In his debut screen role, Charlton Heston plays Dan Haley, an alienated vet turned small-time gambler who isn’t so much pursued (by the cops, a lounge singer, an anonymous murderer, and a widowed suburbanite) as he is fleeing from his own disillusionment. After fleecing a fellow veteran (Don Defore) in town on business, Dan and his gang of low-ball hustlers (the unholy trinity: Ed Begley, Jack Webb, and Harry Morgan), find themselves the quarry of a psycho-killer bent on revenge. While the mayhem mounts, Fran (Lizabeth Scott), a second-rate songbird is also trying to kill Dan, but softly, with her words. She’s got a thing for this damaged lug: “Don’t you ever need anybody, Danny?” she asks smokily. “What for?” “Just to need,” she answers with her smoldering voice. As rendered by Victor Milner, the setting of Dark City is noir from its beat-up bookie joints and glistening nightclubs to its grimy hotel rooms. But director Dieterle seems intent on redeeming his gooey-eyed gambler, who sees the cards stacked against him. Perhaps, even in this “low and lurid” tale, the wounded vet deserves a winning flush, queen-of-hearts high. —Steve Seid

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Caught (http://mubi.com/films/caught)

Synopsis:
How do you fit a Cinderella story into a noir slipper? Just cast Robert Ryan as Smith Olhrig, a psychopathic Prince Charming, complete with a hectoring attendant and a baronial mansion on Long Island. His princess is Leonora (Barbara Bel Geddes), a charm-school graduate from the Midwest who hooks her dream husband, only to see the dream end and the nightmare begin. Confined within their opulent manse, Leonora waits upon Smith’s every whim, but never his whimsy. She is no trophy wife, but a thing taxidermed and hung on the wall of his will. What once promised security, the baroque manor of an industrialist, now seems like her own personal Guantanamo. No white knight himself, Max Ophuls leads Leonora out of luxury and into the Lower East Side where our forsaken wife meets a self-sacrificing doctor played by James Mason. Here, in the lower depths, Leonora leads a “shabby,” humbling life, until lured back to luxury by her megalomaniacal husband. Lensed with claustrophobic care by the great Lee Garmes, the setting for Caught is stifling in its well-detailed gloom. If there were a political allegory here, we might recall that the promises of the one percent go bad ninety-nine percent of the time. This is Max Ophuls to the max. —Steve Seid

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago


The Maltese Falcon (http://mubi.com/films/the-maltese-falcon)

The Word (http://mubi.com/films/the-word)

Indiscreet (http://mubi.com/films/indiscreet)

Black Narcissus (http://mubi.com/films/black-narcissus)

Hedgehog in the Fog (http://mubi.com/films/hedgehog-in-the-fog)

The Last Temptation of Christ (http://mubi.com/films/the-last-temptation-of-christ)

Collateral (http://mubi.com/films/collateral)


jesse brossoi​t:
New still for Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia

Telmo:
Elephant


Late Spring

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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database about 2 years ago

Kai Ivo Baulitz (http://mubi.com/cast_members/90111)

Christian Tasche (http://mubi.com/cast_members/130898)

Tobias van Dieken (http://mubi.com/cast_members/77640)

Stephan Szász (http://mubi.com/cast_members/91546)

Jockel Tschiersch (http://mubi.com/cast_members/216929)

Wotan Wilke Möhring (http://mubi.com/cast_members/27659)

Annika Blendl (http://mubi.com/cast_members/130636)

Camilla Renschke (http://mubi.com/cast_members/200556)

Anke Sevenich (http://mubi.com/cast_members/351588)

Patricia Aulitzky (http://mubi.com/cast_members/223365)

Marie-Luise Schramm (http://mubi.com/cast_members/208422)

The Maltese Falcon (http://mubi.com/films/the-maltese-falcon)

(same still in original size!)

The Word (http://mubi.com/films/the-word)


(the current still is a production still!)

Black Narcissus (http://mubi.com/films/black-narcissus)

The Deer Hunter (http://mubi.com/films/the-deer-hunter)

(same still in original size!)

Hedgehog in the Fog (http://mubi.com/films/hedgehog-in-the-fog)

The Last Temptation of Christ (http://mubi.com/films/the-last-temptation-of-christ)

Collateral (http://mubi.com/films/collateral)

(the current still looks terrible, please replace it with this Blu-ray screen capture!)

Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (http://mubi.com/films/kill-bill-vol-1)

(the current still is of terrible quality, please replace it with this Blu-ray screen capture!)


jesse brossoi​t:
New still for Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia


Telmo:
Elephant


Late Spring

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