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Reseñas críticas
Corrupción en Miami
Michael Mann Estados Unidos, 2006
The digital photography looks like heartsick surveillance footage. John Murphy’s music is a heartbeat. These two undercover cops (Farrell, Foxx) ply their trade with minimal bravado, cool but never trying to be cool. Their every action movie action elicits a reaction, and each instance of gunplay carries consequences of its own. No real heroism in this 21st century To Have and Have Not; just hard work and star-crossed romance.
November 06, 2017
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As cinematic as the movie Miami Vice clearly is—in some ways it’s the apotheosis of Mann’s pop Antonioni artistry—it’s also an exquisite distillation of what made the TV show extraordinary. The movie employs tactics that were no longer formally avant-garde within the vernacular of film in 2006, and certainly not within the widescreen ratio of 2.35:1, but it nevertheless embraces them with an intensity and sincerity worthy of the source.
April 21, 2015
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The film’s sense of dread is vast and oppressive; its fleeting moments of freedom—like a go-fast boat ride that rivals the ending of Mann’s ownHeat as the all-time best use of Moby in a film—are vividly rendered. I’d be lying if I said that I’m not moved by it.
May 13, 2013
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Michael Mann’s 2006 film Miami Vice seems, to this critic’s eyes, the realization of that promise [that digital video can create a new kind of image different from celluloid film]… Vice marks an important shift for Hollywood in the digital era for the way it actively engaged with the implications of a technological change most had simply taken for granted, and it does so by both wholly embracing its mode of production and reflecting the consequences of doing so.
April 17, 2013
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In an earlier write up for the series, on MANHUNTER, Sachs mentions experimental filmmaker Stan Brakhage in reference to Mann’s creation of ambience. And Vishnevetsky refers several times to the abstracting qualities of his mise-en-scene. These traits are most strikingly realized, perhaps, in VICE: somehow Mann has come as close as one can to making an abstract, avant-garde film in the guise of a Hollywood genre movie.
November 27, 2009
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Late in Miami Vice, preparing for the climax, Jaime Foxx’s Ricardo Tubbs asks his partner, Colin Farrell’s Sonny Crockett, “So, fabricated identity, and what’s really up, collapses [sic] into one frame—you ready for that on this one?” Sure enough, that’s what the whole movie is about: intersections across invisible boundaries. And that’s what film is: an invisible collapse of the ineluctable present’s invisible boundaries.
April 26, 2008
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The greatest contemporary American filmmaker proves once again his ability to bend the logic of the blockbuster (Miami Vice was thus oversold) to his personal universe, to the extent that occasionally one has the impression of a brilliant re-routing of money in favour of a radical work that does not give up its author’s formal and stylistic ambitions.
February 13, 2007
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So A.O. Scott compared this to Brakhage. He’s not entirely crazy to do so; there are a few moments that could pass for milliseconds of his work. But other parts are more like high-tech Kenneth Anger (especially the two shower scenes, yellow and blue light glinting off water like sparks), and actually a lot of it resembles the saturated, high-key videography Godard used in the second half of In Praise of Love.
August 15, 2006
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Everything on Mann’s resume predicts the exact Miami Vice that he made, which isn’t to say that it’s his masterpiece. Heat is the better film, but Vice is the messy towel-wringing of all of Mann’s thematic, moralistic, and, most importantly, stylistic pet obsessions up to this point. It’s such a declaratory explosion that it would seem necessary for the director to take another Last of the Mohicans or Insider-style detour next, as he may have milked moody cop bombast dry, albeit gloriously.
August 10, 2006
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Very few can make $135 million studio investment seem handcrafted in contemporary entertainment; even fewer can make those entertainments seem faintly like art… Michael Mann’s one of the few playing this high-stakes game of building a better Babylon to make good. Sex between titans, monumental brooding, death in Dolby — Mann’s folly is the best show in town.
August 04, 2006
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Miami Vice is The New World’s gangland cousin, a fully formed tone poem – intertwining spirit and eros – about characters trapped (often of their own volition) within a rapidly evolving eternal present. This is something of a change for Mann, whose characters are often trying to outrun the past, only to find it catching violently up with them.
August 04, 2006
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Reviewers dismissing the style as shallow fail to see the experimental essentiality of Mann’s deep-focus compositions — style is here not a template for TV ads, but the air the characters navigate, protecting and entrapping them, through the shadowy labyrinths of undercover sleuthing, love, and life itself.
August 03, 2006
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Not so much a big-screen adaptation of the guilty-pleasure 80s TV show as an updated, expanded re-imagining, writer-director Mann’s ostentatiously no-nonsense, all-business, so-straight-it’s-almost-camp Miami Vice consistently dazzles with its visuals, moodiness and swagger – only to stumble over its own (immaculately-shod) feet because of its ropey-at-best story, script and characterisation.
August 01, 2006
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An aura of authenticity is ensured by the script’s meticulous attention to detail and by the bold, fluid direction and editing. At the same time, Mann goes way beyond realism, Dion Beebe’s often gritty handheld digital camerawork also serving to produce images at once intricate in their expressionist eloquence and mythic in their noir poetry.
August 01, 2006
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Michael Mann’s stylish exercises in existentialist dick-swagger have always been off-putting to me, almost hysterical, but Miami Vice, no joke, is one of the best Hollywood films of the year. This movie materializes and soars out of a splendiferous, almost sci-fi ether (almost every image is as intense as the great waterfall sequence from The Last of the Mohicans), with none of Heat’s overblown macho posturing, Ali’s bogus high-mindedness, or Collateral’s muggy view of the world.
July 31, 2006
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Miami Vice is startling because it is strange, nearly unclassifiable, and for it to have come out of Hollywood is a wonder… [Collateral] was an intimate film, nearly a chamber drama with Jamie Foxx and Tom Cruise locked in a cab and alone in a street-lit nighttime Los Angeles. In Miami Vice Cruise is out and Colin Farrell is in, but the result is neither intimate nor character based. It is big, sprawling, shaggy, and amateurish, and fascinating in its awkwardness.
July 28, 2006
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Miami Vice" is good, although perhaps not simply good: This is a fascinating picture, and sometimes a perplexing one, an action picture with a personal sensibility behind it — it’s not just driven by the voices of some unseen marketing committee. The picture is almost nothing like the TV show it’s based on. Mann defies nostalgia instead of stroking it.
July 28, 2006
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The movie is seriously sexy and seriously entertaining.
July 28, 2006
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The movie has what the show had: atmosphere to burn. The woozy, disorienting, fever-dream ambiance that’s a Mann trademark (and which he and cinematographer Dion Beebe perfected in Collateral) is as much a character as the cops and robbers, all of them playing with shifting identities and uncertain loyalties.
July 28, 2006
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Vice disappoints because so many things Mann does wrong here were done right in his earlier work. Compare, for instance, the interaction between Joan Allen and Tom Noonan in Manhunter with Gong and Farrell, or Collateral’s suspense level to Vice’s; look at the complex minority characters in Last of the Mohicans and in Vice’s TV incarnation. The movie version of Vice is instead a means to earn a quick buck from an audience which, for the most part, wasn’t alive when series originally aired.
July 28, 2006
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It’s a little perverse that the big-screen adaptation of Miami Vice, an ‘80s cop show remembered for its decadent beachfront locales and pastel color scheme, turns out to be the summer’s least frivolous movie. Mann essentially builds a luxury suite for material normally confined to a by-the-hour motel, but sometimes trash can be art, too.
July 26, 2006
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None of that description will quite prepare you for the visceral impact of Vice—the way each round of the characters’ high-powered weaponry lands with unnerving force under the shimmering pitch blacks and pearl grays of Dion Beebe’s HD videography. (No director since Peckinpah has staged more repellently beautiful orgies of on-screen carnage than Mann.)
July 25, 2006
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The two-hour-plus running time is a massive amount of time to be hanging around with non-developed characters in relationships with women that they self describe as having “no future” and chasing South American drug kingpins who are well-acted by the goofy, fast-talking John Ortiz and the lean, meticulously still and quiet Luis Tosar but not given any scenes that burn themselves into our memory.
July 25, 2006
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There’s not much Miami but loads of vice in Michael Mann’s big-screen adaptation of the 80s TV series he created with Anthony Yerkovich—in particular the vice of a gifted director letting his talent go to seed. The pacing and proportion of Heat (1995) and the feeling for place and character evident in Collateral (2004) have been tossed aside for a routine plot in which vice cops Colin Farrell and Jamie Foxx pose as drug dealers.
July 21, 2006
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