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Ratings & Reviews

  1. Lights in the Dusk's rating of the film Edward II

    Jarman's masterwork is a marvel of low-budget ingenuity & defiant personal vision. Setting Marlowe's text in what appears to be an underground bunker (extending the post-apocalyptic reveries of his previous work) we have the sense of an imprisoning world of stone & shadow where no true love can grow. Modern iconography crashes into archaic speech, as Jarman once against shows the cyclical nature of human experience.

  2. msmichel's rating of the film Edward II

    Jarman, here working with his biggest budget, took the Christopher Marlowe play and adapted it pretty faithfully adding a visual subtext of gay oppression and expression resulting in one of his best realized creations. The wildly anachronistic visual pastiche is a triumph as is the wonderful costume creations of Sandy Powell long before the multiple Oscars she would score later in her career.

  3. Theories Of Anxiety's rating of the film Edward II

    I loved it but there was something wrong with it. I don't know why but at times it seemed so flat. Anyway, Tilda Swinton is a pure goddess.

  4. Greg's rating of the film Edward II

    Interesting but flawed. The acting is excellent. The ideas explode off the screen, but at times fall flat and are occasionally unintentionally funny.

  5. Sneerwell's rating of the film Edward II

    A pure marvel. Enjoyed every single shot of it, full of Jarman's trademark anachronisms, Tilda Swinton's gorgeous looks and a bewitching combination of passion and the frenzy of despair that burns the characters out. [The final scene with little Edward dancing on a cage is oh so poignantly beautiful]

  6. vera_ryzhik's rating of the film Edward II

    derek jarman marathon. in my opinion one of the best filmmakers, and completely underrated.

  7. Richmond Hill's rating of the film Edward II

    Resolutely 'queer' take on Marlowe, overlaid with needless (then contemporary) agit prop. It works in fits and starts with the stark, studio-bound staging enhanced by some crisp performances from Terry and Swinton, although Jarman lays on the queerness with a heavy spade. However, it's a fairly steady narrative away from the director's more personal experiments in tone and form. Straight forward.