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7.2
/10
131 Ratings

Here Comes Mr. Jordan

Directed by Alexander Hall
United States, 1941
Comedy, Fantasy, Romance

Synopsis

Robert Montgomery plays boxer Joe Pendleton, who insists upon piloting his own plane. Just before a championship bout, Joe’s plane crashes. When he revives, he finds he has been whisked away to Heaven by the overanxious Messenger #7013.

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Here Comes Mr. Jordan Directed by Alexander Hall

Awards & Festivals

Academy Awards

1942 | 2 wins including: Best Writing, Original Story

1942 | 5 nominations including: Best Picture

National Board of Review

1941 | Winner: Top Ten Films

New York Film Critics Circle Awards

1941 | 3rd place: Best Actor

If the film initially stands out for its decidedly sardonic treatment of death, it also relinquishes that through line for a more conventional love story between Joe (who’s in a third body by the film’s end) and Bette that merely affirms an “it’s the inside that counts” narrative of romantic attachment.
June 16, 2016
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The much-loved Here Comes Mr. Jordan has spawned two direct remakes and a sequel, but the 1941 original retains a snap and a vigor—and a unique charm—that no other version has been able to duplicate. Why does it keep such a hold on our affections? Perhaps it’s the way it mixes elements in a way unique to its era—screwball comedy, slapstick farce, boxing fable, supernatural romance.
June 14, 2016
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The film’s sturdy comic premise, derived from a stage play by Harry Segall, provides plenty of laughs, especially once Joe reveals his secret to his former manager, played with terrific comic gusto by James Gleason. (Gleason was justly nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar but lost to How Green Was My Valley’s Donald Crisp.) Joe being recognized in his new form thanks to his ineptitude on the saxophone is an inspired touch.
June 11, 2016
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