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Ratings & Reviews

  1. Il secondo maestro del revolver's rating of the film It May Be That Beauty Has Reinforced Our Resolve – Masao Adachi

  2. vN44NvAA / noncivez's rating of the film It May Be That Beauty Has Reinforced Our Resolve – Masao Adachi

  3. J0NS's rating of the film It May Be That Beauty Has Reinforced Our Resolve – Masao Adachi

  4. Miggy Angel's rating of the film It May Be That Beauty Has Reinforced Our Resolve – Masao Adachi

    "The revolution is also an image. The problem is how to make the image real."

  5. le Gars's rating of the film It May Be That Beauty Has Reinforced Our Resolve – Masao Adachi

    «So perhaps this is the ultimate goal of Grandrieux, his "hasard objectif": turning Adachi into pure sensation.» Here the review: http://specchioscuro.it/probabilmente-la-bellezza-ha-rinforzato-il-nostro-proposito/#english

  6. José Neves's rating of the film It May Be That Beauty Has Reinforced Our Resolve – Masao Adachi

    It may be that the need to make beauty has reinforced the decision of how to film and in that sense limited it, because that need is exposed and demonstrated in every moment. However, the beginning is actually quite beautiful, but in a productive manner with an inner speech organically flowing with a sequence-shot. At the end, with the direct interview, the film finds its true discourse.

  7. Karthik's rating of the film It May Be That Beauty Has Reinforced Our Resolve – Masao Adachi

    A melancholy meditation on art & revolution post 70s & on idealism, with an aging revolutionary reflecting on his past fervour & his life in film & politics (which for him are the same thing). There's a sense of a Keatsian 'passionate defeat' in its juxtaposition of violent youthful dreams of utopia against the surreal placid cityscapes of Tokyo, but the film consistently transmutes political feelings into spiritual

  8. Scott Barley's rating of the film It May Be That Beauty Has Reinforced Our Resolve – Masao Adachi

    It takes a little while to adjust to a Grandrieux documentary of sorts, rather than a feature. This is mostly due to this film's aural-visuals being far less irate and sensory compared to his previous work, but once you acclimatise, the result is surprisingly intimate, political and gorgeous... seriously gorgeous.