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Ratings & Reviews

  1. José Neves's rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    35mm, re-rating. In the court, we find the derivative meanings of what would become the "Lubitsch touch," something away here. In the streets and among the people, in the French revolution, we find Griffith, who would do much better with his "Orphans of the Storm", since he was the holder of his narrative ways. Lubitsch is not interested in the facts of the History, but rather in the stories that a film can play.

  2. FISCHER's rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    Un mélo(drame) costumé sur l'irrésistible ascension de la célèbre héroïne, sans cesse déchirée entre sa soif d'honneurs, de reconnaissance et la culpabilisante résurgence des sentiments qu'elle n'arrive pas à juguler... www.cinefiches.com

  3. alhimself-'s rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    Great to remember how much can be covered with no words. Also a delight to witness how deftly and precisely the actors of this era were moving their bodies. They zoom across the shot and land bang in the right place. Lovely use of filters.

  4. JordanBrooks's rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    Lubitsch is a master camera operator. His shifts between framed close-ups and full shots captures the pure melodrama of MME DUBARRY perfectly.

  5. Superfrog's rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    The use of black and white + colour filter really works. Enjoyed the technical aspects of the film but was rather unenticed by the story

  6. JOHN ATHERTON's rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    They knew how to do Drama with a Capital D. Suprisingly emotional and a good story if detail not taken too seriously historically.

  7. Ashley Spendlove's rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    Packs a surprising emotional punch, partly due to the breadth of tone and the real uneasiness in the early scenes and the ambiguous power relations between Jeanne and her predators/suitors. The switch into the more epic territory of the Revolution took me by surprise - amazing visuals and crowd scenes. The final shot - stark - has really stayed with me.

  8. Enrico Cioni's rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    Loved the first half, particularly all the bulging eyes and jutting chins and lecherous smiles (made me think of that Norma Desmond quote: "We didn't need dialogue, we had faces!"). Second half very slow, and the historical inaccuracies, though not the sort of thing that normally bothers me, were infuriating.

  9. The Heff's rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    This is a film!!!...why did 'talkies' have to come along? ...visual, orchestral and a gripping storyline...with an added nod to Dickens thrown in...recommend :-)

  10. raggiodisole's rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    oh the drama. overegged in places, for sure, but this take on French revolution has style, pace and superb costmes

  11. Mx Nihil's rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    An entertaining, visually impressive historical melodrama.

  12. suede's rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    One of early Lubitsch's two essential costume dramas, the other being "Anna Boleyn" (1920). Remarkable: filmed in royal Potsdam locations (the German Kaiser abdicated in Nov. 1918). Seen with Stephan v. Bothmer's recent orchestral composition (2007). Competent, but not recommendable. Silent films don't need overbearing scores that restate the obvious; four timpanists aren't needed to comment on Mme Dubarry's fate.

  13. Duncan Gray's rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    Lubitsch's rep is so tied to comedy that it's surprising to find out that his initial fame in the US was as the "Griffith of Europe", maker of lavish period pieces. But this delightful (im)morality play shows that his take on history and his take on comedy aren't far off, viewing human foibles in much the same way. As a woman whose innocent sexuality drives guilty men mad, Pola Negri beats Louise Brooks to the punch.

  14. εξώτερο Διάστημα's rating of the film Madame DuBarry

    Needed to see something with wigs that wasn't Barry Lyndon, cuz every day I walk the furnished corridors of an 18th century dressing room laid open in the streets and parks. Trees are in bloom and powdered yellow periwigs, red toupees, earlobe-pink petticoats, pale cyan merkins, buttercream fur hoods cover the hardwood mannequins like painted drying bells. The shrubs that remain nude and artless, craggy and stiff as