Para disfrutar de una experiencia mejor en MUBI, Actualiza tu buscador
Critics reviews
Night Moves
Kelly Reichardt United States, 2013
Night Moves at once follows the template of heist films such as Rififi—another film about a mostly unacquainted trio joining together for one big job before turning on each other—and remains strangely detached from it… Reichardt’s patient, observational takes, from her shots of barren trees to an insert shot of a garbage dump, opt for verisimilitude at odds with the heist flick.
June 01, 2016
Read full article
Night Moves is cruel and paranoid where Old Joy was tender and elegiac, but both movies (and really all her movies) are taking place in the latter’s “falling-tear-shaped universe”, where tragedy seems at once inevitable and entirely self-willed. It’s a contradiction that could drive a person crazy, and in Night Moves – which is finally a very scary film – it absolutely does.
August 28, 2014
Read full article
Unfortunately, despite best efforts from both Jesse Eisenberg and Dakota Fanning, the characters feel like they’re working against their own internal logic. The twist ending belies too much of the well-crafted dynamic that came before it. Not only that, but the event that turns the narrative also undermines its social conviction. In trying to present a balanced view of the counter-argument, Reichardt sadly dismisses her own.
July 11, 2014
Read full article
There is something undeniably retrograde about Reichardt’s approach to an existential modern narrative with her deliberate pacing, notably quiet performances and careful camerawork. Although traces of Arthur Penn’s original could, perhaps, be found here, for me Night Moves harkens back to the early road movies of Monte Hellman… The film builds to a conventionally (dare I say De Palma-esque) climactic sequence where Josh breaks into Dena’s work after hours, intent on silencing her.
June 04, 2014
Read full article
…These incidents—not to mention the final minutes leading up to the bombing itself—are breathtakingly tense and dominate the film’s first half. If the second, which centers primarily on Josh’s icy unraveling after the attack has a grave, unintended consequence, is less successful, what remains constant is Reichardt’s ability to coolly present thorny sociopolitical and moral issues.
May 30, 2014
Read full article
Night Moves rejects the insidious idea of “equal time”: for every environmentally agitated player, there isn’t a corresponding voice heard scoffing that climate change is a conspiracy foisted by Al Gore’s profit-driven corporate friends or that it’s all a product of sunspot expansion… Instead, Night Moves presents a sliding scale of activist involvement, commitment and oppositional pushback against the status quo and asks viewers to consider where they stand.
May 30, 2014
Read full article
All this suspense trickery is done brilliantly, and Reichardt makes dead time, lack of incident, lack of apparent jeopardy all figure just as dramatically as the obvious teeth-gritting stuff: the muted ripples of Jeff Grace’s score crank up the tension just as much as any Herrmann pastiche.
May 29, 2014
Read full article
…The potentially unintended result of all this is that Reichardt’s story, cowritten with frequent collaborator Jonathan Raymond, comes across as little more than a solemn near-parody of the radical left—that the film would play right into the hands of more conservative viewers matters less than that such broad strokes ultimately make for a rather flat character-based narrative.
May 29, 2014
Read full article
A chronicler of the ebb and flow of the American spirit, she digs into the foundations of this modern lifestyle, pushing past surface qualities to analyze the deeper impulse toward independent action, imagining political rebellion as a reflection of emotional unease.
April 22, 2014
Read full article
While the film’s first hour is consistently tense, as Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard conspire to blow up an environmentally damaging dam, Reichardt then takes the storyline into trite, hackneyed territory, transforming Night Moves into a heavy-handed morality tale with the most banal of political messages.
December 17, 2013
Read full article
They then go their separate ways only to confront a growing sense of futility and paranoia. From the slow, meticulously filmed preparation of the act to the tensely dilated period of doubt (the film’s second and stronger half), an odd languid thriller emerges.
November 12, 2013
Read full article
While it’s interesting to see a film raise its most important questions and work through its most important themes only in the home stretch, the sense that half the feature has been set up for what is more or less a narrative punchline feels somewhat disingenuous. The aftermath in this case serves to prove too clean a point about the action which precedes it, a trick that simultaneously invalidates the film’s baser genre pleasures while making its intellectual ambitions seem too schematic
September 18, 2013
Read full article
Reichardt tactfully avoids pushing an agenda, neither glamorizing nor condemning activism, instead opting for sensory extrapolation of the protagonist’s Dostoevskian moral dilemma. And, with its disturbing final shot (observed through an obscured mirror), Night Moves ambiguously hints that perhaps the devastating nadir of an activist’s soul, having given way to world-weary guilt, is simply taking a step toward compromising one’s ideals.
September 17, 2013
Read full article
This is the first of the movies Reichardt has made with her writing partner, Jon Raymond, in which the characters feel like they’re at the mercy of the narrative… I couldn’t even tell you how long Eisenberg’s brooding Josh and Dena have known each other, or whether they were once romantically involved. And those details matter, given the trajectory of this unusually (for Reichardt) plot-driven movie. Shocking events occur, but they carry little weight, because they seem imposed from without.
September 11, 2013
Read full article
What truly fascinate Reichardt are less the mechanics of genre than the mechanics of conscience, a narrative of hard guilt and paranoia leading, in the final shot, into an alien world. The film’s pitiless pessimism may clarify its appropriation of the title of one of the quintessential neo-noirs of 70s American cinema, even if it comes at the cost of the spaciousness of the filmmaker’s earlier work.
September 10, 2013
Read full article
Accruing fascinating procedural details en route to its centerpiece, Night Moves eventually becomes a study in guilt and paranoia. Just as Meek’s fed the conventions of the oater through the director’s distinctly offbeat sensibilities, this new one sometimes feels like her attempt at noir—especially once the threat of getting exposed creates a rift between Eisenberg and Fanning. But it never quite convinces on that front.
September 10, 2013
Read full article
The suspense is built exquisitely, in such scenes as Fanning negotiating with a farm-supply salesman (James LeGros) to make a purchase without showing a Social Security card. But the movie’s upshot is banal, as it gradually dawns on this trio that their plan isn’t as brilliant as they thought. The last act is a letdown, a case of characters who’ve painted themselves into a corner leaving a filmmaker without a way out.
September 10, 2013
Read full article
…Allowing for the plot to slowly unfold through these observational moments, Night Moves is more a procedural than thriller. Though this isn’t to say the film lacks tension, as Reichardt still manages to create a pervading sense of anxiety (which is heightened by the impeccable score). Toying with this feeling of impending doom, like her other films Night Moves resists an easy conclusion, still falling under the category of anti-climax cinema.
September 10, 2013
Read full article
[Reichardt] isn’t a genre director. She’s a realist and an observer of people in situations of her own devising. This is the first film in which she contemplates scratching a commercial itch. And I’m excited to see where she takes that experiment. In the meantime, this movie — with its cold-blooded climax — is like a 1960s French thriller in Red Wings and a Carhartt jacket.
September 09, 2013
Read full article
This is Eisenberg’s most introspective performance to date, and taking cues from his performance, the film unfolds with a steady, measured pace.
September 05, 2013
Read full article
Some have said it would have made a purer film if Reichardt stuck to the raid, but for me this last film noir-like segment has a devastating accuracy about the thin line between ordinary behaviour and the unthinking promulgation of terror.
September 03, 2013
Read full article
Night Moves is Reichardt’s first thriller, and it’s fascinating to watch her work in this mode. Like nearly all of her movies—especially the languid pioneer drama Meek’s Cutoff—Night Moves inches forward, rather than taking large leaps. But Reichardt is adept at orchestrating long stretches of tension. At times I thought I was bored, only to realize that I was actually feeling anxious and more than a little queasy.
September 03, 2013
Read full article
This is another stunning work from Reichardt, a director who with each new film is looking more and more like America’s best. It’s never preachy or polemical and it’s always supremely refined and pure.
August 30, 2013
Read full article