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Critics reviews
Sunset
László Nemes Hungary, 2018
In Sunset, Nemes’s filmmaking is as absorbing as it was in Son of Saul. Budapest at the beginning of the 20th century—where an orphaned young woman, Irisz, searches for her mysterious brother while working at an upscale hat emporium—presents its own kind of nightmare, made ominous and fantastical through Nemes’ claustrophobic framing, chiaroscuro look, and fluid camera movement.
September 25, 2018
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In my opinion, Nemes has done something extraordinary. He has taken the same basic approach but turned it to an entirely different use. Now the restricted point of view functions to slowly dole out clues in a complicated double mystery plot. The result is complex, tantalizing, and absorbing.
September 19, 2018
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All this motion gives an impression of a world that is not so much constructed for the camera but rather is full, whose existence seethes even beyond the edges of the frame.
September 09, 2018
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In Nemes’s second feature Sunset—arguably the most audacious film in this year’s Venice Film Festival—it’s not the moral situation of the heroine that we’re invited to assess, but something more fundamental. Sunset challenges us from start to finish simply to make head or tail of what’s going on.
September 07, 2018
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While this personal story is obviously very political, the film is so sparse on information that its dramaturgy of a deferred uncovering soon seems more like mannerism.
September 06, 2018
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As with Pynchon, history is represented as an entropic, conspirational whirlwind that sweeps ups the individual, for whom the exercise of free will is a pursuit at once vital and futile. To rush along at this breakneck rhythm for almost two-and-a-half hours is intoxicating and exhausting.
September 06, 2018
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