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Ratings & Reviews

  1. FISCHER's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    Encore un excellent Douglas Sirk, malgré une fin lourdement conventionnelle... www.cinefiches.com

  2. ASHES IN THE HOURGLASS's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    The only Sirk that works for me likely due to my bias for the infinite possibilities afforded by black and white over the binary symbolism of colour. There's also something to be said about it functioning much better as a social critique thanks to its bitter ending. Also, the children in this are such conniving pieces of shit that I love them in contrast to the dimwits in All That Heaven Allows.

  3. El Biffo's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    Not only is the Hollywood Ending subverted, but the whole idea of the perfect 1950's American family as well. This may be my favorite Sirk picture (so far) 4.5

  4. Karl J. Kipling's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    3.5. Funny how the roles are reversed here: it's the wife who's the totally insensitive dullard who drives her spouse to contemplate an affair. He complains about how they never spend any time together anymore, that the marriage lacks the old spark. And the kids are totally horrible, as usual in Sirk, whose movies are so often about what a sad, desperate, spiritually corrosive place the U. S. is.

  5. Bilouaustria's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    Great casting idea : if we believe so much in this old love and even feel the nostalgia and the regrets it is because we do remember Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray loving each other in "Double Indemnity". Sirk kind of play on a second level with this emotional tie that goes beyond his own film. In the second half, the construction of frames within the shots are amazing. Hollywood golden era !

  6. Dale Wittig's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray were reunited on screen again in this great film by Sirk, maybe his best. They were in Remember the Night, and famously in Double Indemnity, Billy Wilder’s movie. Russell Metty shot in black & white. Rex the walking talking Robot is Fred’s alter ego. It’s pretty grim. I saw this on Home Maker’s Movie on WTIC Hartford in 1964, then again, projected at UConn's Sirk Retro in 1974.

  7. SpacePirate's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    Pretty much like watching my parents marriage unfold on the screen. Very real and a quite bleak depiction of married life, rather rare for Hollywood then. 4.5 stars

  8. Irma Vep's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    A picture of love and family so bleak and heartrending it made me feel physically ill.

  9. jsaez's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    I CANT BELIEVE I'VE NEVER SEEN THIS! I've seen "All I Desire," but that wasn't a high point for Stanwyck or Sirk.

  10. Scotch's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    A pretty complicated portrait of family and (near) adultery that has a little queer spin in the shape of a misplaced robot metaphor and an ending that feels too odd and too sad to not be read as Douglas laughing at how formulaic and didactic the ending was supposed to be. Everyone but Barbara and sassy Pat was such a sap!

  11. mjgildea's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    I'm not sure could appreciate There's Always Tomorrow to the extent I do without being a husband & dad. I was immediately sad for Cliff, a walking paycheck w/his obliviously dopey wife & vampiricly unappreciative asshole kids. When Stanwyck showed that sadness I felt never let up, becoming almost absolute by the bullshit ending. I'd have loved to have seen this in color but black & white was almost more appropriate.

  12. Martin Sichetti's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    Sirk is doubtless the owner of Melodrama, and I have to highlight the costumes: superb!

  13. nuno q's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    So overshadowed by other Sirk's, but definitely one of his major and most memorable accomplishments. To see Stanwyck and MacMurray once more after "Double Indemnity" is a blessing. A love story of sorts, a visit from ghosts past, the opportunity for redemption, or how the "American Family" and the "American Dream" are not necessarily synonymous.

  14. Jake Cole's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    The American man is as trapped by postwar society as the women, it seems. Cliff is objectified even by his own family as naught but a breadwinner, and when he is tempted back into life outside his deadening routine, his children react as much against the disruption as they do loyalty to their mother. Black and white emotional remove replaces lush, visceral color. Cliff does not even have the luxury of a breakdown.

  15. This is Jake Kath's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    Wow, I didn't enjoy most of this movie but the last minutes made up for it. Douglas Sirk's subversion is a lot more subtle and tragic than his other movies because at least the main character had a chance! Its the children in this that cause the fall. Always look out for the children.

  16. axsaxs's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    The only other Sirk film I've seen is Magnificent Obsession, and I disliked that. This on the other hand, is rather good; Stanwyck/MacMurray made this picture as much as Sirk himself.

  17. Jugend21's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    Love it. I love how the kids are the enemy

  18. Neither/Nor's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    In Sirkian defense of an empty life.

  19. catch_33's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    A tad more subdued than the other Sirk's I've recently seen, but only barely. A great tale of the self-trappings of a domesticated man and his mid-life crisis. A tad twist of fate is that his dissatisfaction springs from his children's behaviour over his suspected affair. Sirk's framing and subtext is ripe and picking for analysis, but beyond that it is just a striking study of an American family.

  20. MikeKiddo's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    interesting sex inverted companion piece to All that Heaven Allows: simple but poignant dissection of a discontent spouse who suffers for 'rebelling' against what's expected of them.

  21. Yuki Aditya's rating of the film There's Always Tomorrow

    sappy as hell, but the Stanwyck's monologue about father, made me cry like a little girl