For a better experience on MUBI, update your browser.
Avis des critiques
Wendy et Lucy
Kelly Reichardt États-Unis, 2008
Reichardt is not as interested in the scenic beauty of the state as she is its purgatorial nature, stripping away its beauty in service of illuminating themes of poverty and loneliness. Wendy and Lucy is the most vivid example of the infinite journey and all that informs its construction, visually and thematically, in Reichardt’s cinema.
June 19, 2014
Lire l'article
It’s a small gem that has all the Americana of a John Ford movie yet recalls the naturalism of VAGABOND and even UMBERTO D. And like those movies it’s about people literally living hand to mouth, an existence where a gift of $6 (which occurs towards the end) is truly a sacrifice. Owing much to co-screenwriter Jon Raymond’s fiction, it unfolds like a perfectly constructed novella.
May 16, 2014
Lire l'article
It’s almost a structuralist triumph: how to make the most emotionally wrenching indie of the new era with as little narrative as possible… The film’s genuine power comes not from transcending or expanding that piddling premise, but making the situation burn on your eyes like sulfur.
May 05, 2009
Lire l'article
WENDY AND LUCY is a movie that whispers to rather than yells at. It’s a cup of water and some nuts for our caffeine and sweets-addicted audiences. It has faith that the cinema can make the ordinary exciting and stimulating in ways that other art struggles or fails to.
January 30, 2009
Lire l'article
Michelle Williams shows us crisis by crouching in a ball and merely pressing her palms into her forehead. This doesn’t sound like much, but given the woeful lack of inner life for young women in American movies, Williams’s single gesture of fatigue and partial defeat in “Wendy and Lucy” is momentous.
January 23, 2009
Lire l'article
No winner-takes-it-all, last-minute bonanza for Kelly Reichardt, who in Wendy and Lucy once more offers evidence of steadily (and stealthily) becoming one of the most intelligent and humane American directors… Reichardt’s filmmaking shows deftness and patience and an eye for stark beauty, with at least one image (the heroine silhouetted sitting on the hood of her car with a Walmart in the background) that’s as evocative as a Walker Evans photograph.
December 25, 2008
Lire l'article
Will Oldham’s childish, nostalgic, and lyrical hummed theme for Wendy and her dog neatly encapsulates the film, which attacks a simple, sad theme with an exemplary, but modest cast and crew, who bring a powerfully sympathetic approach. The sadness is natural, and therefore all the more sad, and it takes a patience, a kindness, and a calm to bring an inner life, however painful, to such a film.
December 12, 2008
Lire l'article
Reichardt is a minimalist first and a social critic second, which is to say that while “Wendy and Lucy” is as damning as any Ken Loach film, it preaches in a whisper, not a shout — a whisper or, rather, a song, like the wordless, undulating hum that takes the place of a musical score. Evanescent and intangible, it dissolves into the air, leaving something tragic and mysterious behind.
December 12, 2008
Lire l'article
Having the dog around raises the emotional stakes tenfold, and develops a kinship with Vittorio De Sica’s Italian neo-realist classic Umberto D., which also revealed societal ills through a poignant dog-owner relationship. As with Old Joy, Reichardt has an excellent sense of proportion: She doesn’t try to do too much, but what she does do is fully realized. Animal-lovers are hereby advised to bring the Kleenex.
December 10, 2008
Lire l'article
As good as Williams is, the true star of Wendy and Lucy is Reichardt’s exquisite filmmaking. Williams is a big piece of the celluloid puzzle but she isn’t the puzzle itself. The movie is less about Wendy than about the environment surrounding her, how outside forces collide with human flesh, bringing us to a deeper understanding of ourselves.
December 10, 2008
Lire l'article
Modest but cosmic… Trembling throughout on the verge of a tearful breakdown, but far too dignified to allow her character to choke up, Williams delivers a sensationally nuanced performance that, were it not so resolutely undramatic, would constitute an aria of stoical misery.
December 10, 2008
Lire l'article
With its recognizable star and universal animal-in-peril narrative Wendy and Lucy is likely to reach a much wider audience than its predecessor, but it’s not a crossover bid. Consider it instead as another quietly urgent missive from what Oldham’s Old Joy character described in front of that campfire as “a falling-tear shaped universe”—a melancholy realm that, for a lot of people, will look distinctly like reality.
December 07, 2008
Lire l'article
To her credit, Reichardt never allows her camera to become a voyeuristic witness to a young woman in distress. Instead, it remains focused on a largely indifferent American landscape of strangers in perpetual motion to nowhere. I suspect that there was more than the usual degree of rapport between the director and the actress, particularly in the mysterious realm of improvisation. Hence, I recommend the film as an artistic achievement, though not one unduly addicted to the pleasure principle.
December 02, 2008
Lire l'article
Extraordinarily understated, Williams gives a tangible, if taciturn performance as Wendy, a twentysomething woman traversing the country en route to Alaska, where she hopes to find work at a cannery. With just five hundred dollars, a (very) used car, and a faithful dog to her name, Wendy is living close to the bone, and Williams’ portrayal balances toughness with vulnerability, expressing her dreams and disappointments with the lightest of touches.
September 28, 2008
Lire l'article
Admired critics and friends alike have been praising it to death, some going so far as to consider it the best American film of the year. While there’s certainly much to admire about the film, I can’t help but cling to the notion that there’s something missing, and that it (at times) employs conventional tactics that weaken the work.
September 19, 2008
Lire l'article
Reichardt’s style clears the mind: dialogue is minimal—not artificially, just leaving Williams on her own—framings elegant and magisterial. I didn’t realize how much I liked it until 20 minutes after it was over. The world Reichardt explores—the flat parking lots so close to the woods—is one I recognize. Reichardt’s political ideas are easy to translate into words, and not necessarily good ones; what makes her film haunting is mostly ineffable.
September 18, 2008
Lire l'article
Absent any showy histrionics or mannerisms, Williams’s performance makes painfully real Reichardt’s depiction of everyday problems magnified by poverty into mini-calamities, exhibiting a measured grace that’s matched by complementary beginning-middle-end tracking shots—of woman and dog playing fetch, of dog pound cages, and of dusk-dappled trees spied from a moving train—that encapsulate the film’s emotional trajectory from contentment to sorrow to hopeful uncertainty.
September 17, 2008
Lire l'article
The cheap pathos rarely lets up — I mean, couldn’t her sister and brother-in-law have at least come across as genuinely concerned (even if not enough to do more than offer platitudes), rather than as oblivious and obnoxious, respectively? Did we have to get a sad little insert of the guard’s handout (which I had only assumed to be maybe $20 to begin with, frankly)? Sure, I got choked up at the end, but only in a shameless Old Yeller kind of way.
September 15, 2008
Lire l'article
Reichardt paints on such a miniature canvas that it seems as though, at any moment, the whole delicate house of cards could come undone — if the pic were, for example, 81 minutes instead of 80. But like any seasoned traveler, Reichardt doesn’t overstay her welcome and knows exactly when it’s time to get back on the highway, building, as in “Old Joy,” to a memorable ending suffused equally with possibility and melancholy.
June 02, 2008
Lire l'article