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MGeo's 10 Worst Films of the Teens (So Far)

by MGeo
MGeo's 10 Worst Films of the Teens (So Far) by MGeo
These are only the bad movies I’ve seen (and I rarely if ever see bad movies on purpose). 2010 – Cop Out: I used to love Kevin Smith movies as a lad, but ever since Zack and Miri Make A Porno, it’s become clear that Smith’s career was in trouble; officially confirmed with this film. Not only is it undoubtedly the worst thing Smith has ever made, but it is one of the worst comedies ever made in many a year. Ever since this film cursed him (not that he was an adept filmmaker to begin with), every film he has made since has been bad to varying degrees. It’s pretty clear he doesn’t care or put much effort in his work anymore; a toxic attitude… Read more

These are only the bad movies I’ve seen (and I rarely if ever see bad movies on purpose).

2010 – Cop Out: I used to love Kevin Smith movies as a lad, but ever since Zack and Miri Make A Porno, it’s become clear that Smith’s career was in trouble; officially confirmed with this film. Not only is it undoubtedly the worst thing Smith has ever made, but it is one of the worst comedies ever made in many a year. Ever since this film cursed him (not that he was an adept filmmaker to begin with), every film he has made since has been bad to varying degrees. It’s pretty clear he doesn’t care or put much effort in his work anymore; a toxic attitude that will eventually add up and lower the bar for what is acceptable for independent productions.

2011 – Sucker Punch – Zach Snyder is quite possibly one of the worst directors working today. This film and one other is the proof that this is so. The fact that Hollywood rewards him constantly for making terrible films that succeed on a monumental level is beyond infuriating. In the case of Sucker Punch, this is a film that fools young girls into thinking that it is an action film that is intended to be empowering for them. News flash: it isn’t. It is actually a very sexist, juvenile, nasty piece of work that will trick impressionable girls into feeling good and thinking that this is an acceptable way to portray women in media. The fact that Zach Snyder hasn’t apologized for this is astonishing, because it doesn’t take that much to know the difference between empowerment and objectification.

TO BE CONTINUED

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