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13 Treasures

by Sandy Connell
A list of the films to be written-up for the 13 TREASURES column on Films Of Every Colour 13 TREASURES is a feature intended simply as a platform for recommending and exploring the virtues of exceptional but little-known contemporary films that contribute to a rich and alternative cross-section of contemporary cinema and are worth raving about to the world. Be they bona-fide classics not known outside their home country, obscure short-films of exceptional impact and style, or potential cult favorites that never made it into theatres, every one of the films I’ll be covering is nothing short of a must-see for those hungry for a distinct taste… Read more

A list of the films to be written-up for the 13 TREASURES column on Films Of Every Colour

13 TREASURES is a feature intended simply as a platform for recommending and exploring the virtues of exceptional but little-known contemporary films that contribute to a rich and alternative cross-section of contemporary cinema and are worth raving about to the world. Be they bona-fide classics not known outside their home country, obscure short-films of exceptional impact and style, or potential cult favorites that never made it into theatres, every one of the films I’ll be covering is nothing short of a must-see for those hungry for a distinct taste of the unusual, the alien and the original.

NUDA V BRNĚ (BORED IN BRNO) As a gateway into contemporary Czech comedy, BORED IN BRNO is too singular and off-beat to align viewers’ expectations with the general out-put of a country that has boasted many gifted comedic actors, writers and directors throughout history. As an arrestingly emotional and deeply artistic synergy of hilarious characters, deft comic timing behind the camera and heart-felt meditation on the anxiety we all experience in our search for love in a grimly unromantic world, BORED IN BRNO is a world-class gem of immaculate filmmaking and typically eloquent Czech story-telling.

Though based on the story, Standa Debutuje (Standa’s Debut) by Pavel Bedura, Morávek, Budař and Kopecký, reportedly conceived their script in a bar when discussing their experiences losing their virginity. All the neuroses, uncertainty, pathos, humor and awkwardness there involved pervades this gloriously youthful but wise and adult pean to the follies of those desperate to love and be loved… read on

THE SIGNAL Whilst it could easily prove jarring, THE SIGNAL’s use of the three different styles and creative heads compliments the fractured nature of the world the characters inhabit and skillfully maintains an off-balance sense of foreboding and unpredictability, despite the film’s rhythmic, carefully measured progression. Cinematographer Chris Campbell maintains a strong visual coherence with his hand-held camera work, that judiciously avoids excessive use of the overwrought “shaky-cam” style that has become so overused in contemporary horror and action. But THE SIGNAL stands-out particularly as a rare example of a horror film centered around its actors’ performances. Whether slipping through hallways slaked in blood or debating whether or not to kill the next person that walks in the front door, each character’s thought process and emotional conflict is laid bare by a script demanding of great nuance and flair from its performers. From the very start, each of the leads distinguishes themselves and their character, not least A.J. Bowen as Lewis, who one might suppose was borderline psychotic before the signal got inside his head… read on

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