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Hamid Naficy defines his use of the term “accented”: If the dominant cinema is considered universal and without accent, the films that diasporic and exilic subjects make are accented. […] [T]he accent emanates not so much from the accented speech of the diegetic characters as from the displacement of the filmmakers and their artisanal production modes.” (4) He insists: My task here is to theorize this cinema’s existence as an accented style that encompasses characteristics common to the works of differently situated filmmakers involved in varied decentered social formations and cinematic practices across the globe – all of whom are presumed… Read more

Hamid Naficy defines his use of the term “accented”:

If the dominant cinema is considered universal and without accent, the films that diasporic and exilic subjects make are accented. […] [T]he accent emanates not so much from the accented speech of the diegetic characters as from the displacement of the filmmakers and their artisanal production modes.” (4)

He insists:

My task here is to theorize this cinema’s existence as an accented style that encompasses characteristics common to the works of differently situated filmmakers involved in varied decentered social formations and cinematic practices across the globe – all of whom are presumed to share the fact of displacement and deterritorialization. (21)

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