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Auteurism: Anime [Under Construction]

by Coheed 2.5
Auteurism: Anime [Under Construction] by Coheed 2.5
If “Vulgar” Auteurism, “Vulgar” definitely a subjective choice of wording, as a concept is to become legitimate, it must move beyond just action films. It must encompass all areas of neglected filmic work to function under the desires of its supporters. This list will start with Japanese animation and will hopefully include article links and other such materials in detail. Note that I will only include the works I’ve been able to see as of yet, including ones I am not a fan of but still believe need to be included. I will also include already critically acclaimed works, aside from Studio Ghibli, because many of them interconnect with works… Read more

If “Vulgar” Auteurism, “Vulgar” definitely a subjective choice of wording, as a concept is to become legitimate, it must move beyond just action films. It must encompass all areas of neglected filmic work to function under the desires of its supporters. This list will start with Japanese animation and will hopefully include article links and other such materials in detail.

Note that I will only include the works I’ve been able to see as of yet, including ones I am not a fan of but still believe need to be included. I will also include already critically acclaimed works, aside from Studio Ghibli, because many of them interconnect with works appropriate for the list because, if not for the content, the work of the character designers, composers, line drawers and everyone who makes these films, shows and other works should be taken into consideration for their hard labour and creation.

It may be seen as dismissive to include some of the works and anime creators into this list, but anime has not gotten the critical analysis it should have. Even acclaimed titles on this list are viewed as niche works. Even Akira (1988) is a cult film. This is designed to celebrate the artistry of these works, those of a cerebal nature and those of varying genres. The advantage is that anime is not only about the art as well as the content, but it means “Japanese animation”, so many genres and types of it can sit together side-by-side without ostracization.

Directors of Immense Interest
Anno Hideaki (Director of Neon Genesis Evangelion: The End of Evangelion (1997))
Daichi Akitaroh (Director of Fruits Basket (2001-TV Series))
Dezaki Osamu (Director of Space Adventure Cobra (1982))
Kon Satoshi (Director of Perfect Blue (1997))
Imaishi Hiroyuki (Director of Gurren Lagann (2007-TV Series))
Okiura Hiroyuki (Director of Jin-Roh: The Wolf Brigade (1999))
Oshii Mamoru (Director of Ghost In The Shell (1995))
Ôtomo Katsuhiro (Director of Akira (1988))

Character Designers of Importance
Sugino Akio (Designer for Space Adventure Cobra (1982))

[To Be Added To]
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Anime Works of Immense Interest


Akira (1988, Director: Ôtomo Katsuhiro)


Angel’s Egg (1985, Director: Oshii Mamoru)

Black Jack (1996, Director: Dezaki Osamu)

California Crisis: Gun Salvo (1986, Director: Nishikubo Mizuho)


Cat Soup (2001, Director: Sato Tatsuo)

Ghost in the Shell (1995, Director: Oshii Mamoru)

Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence (2004)

Neon Genesis Evangelion: The End of Evangelion (1997, Directors: Anno Hideaki & Tsurumaki Kazuya)

Lupin the Third: The Secret of Mamo (1978)


Paranoia Agent (2004-TV Series, Director: Kon Satoshi)


Space Adventure Cobra (1982, Director: Dezaki Osamu )

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