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Emilio Fernández

by T. J. Mesen
Emilio ‘Indio" Fernandez, arguably Mexico’s greatest filmmaker and this cinephile’s favourite director. Emilio Fernandez shared many things in common with John Ford. First, a long-lasting friendship; yearning for a utopic future for their respective countries, expressed mainly in their earlier films; and an obsession for what Ford had called "man’s unceasing search for something he can never find.” Most importantly though, they shared a concern for cinema’s power in mythmaking, and certainly the images that el Indio’s films created for Mexico, went far beyond the cinema and are still embedded today (unbeknownst to many of their origin) in… Read more

Emilio ‘Indio" Fernandez, arguably Mexico’s greatest filmmaker and this cinephile’s favourite director.

Emilio Fernandez shared many things in common with John Ford. First, a long-lasting friendship; yearning for a utopic future for their respective countries, expressed mainly in their earlier films; and an obsession for what Ford had called "man’s unceasing search for something he can never find.” Most importantly though, they shared a concern for cinema’s power in mythmaking, and certainly the images that el Indio’s films created for Mexico, went far beyond the cinema and are still embedded today (unbeknownst to many of their origin) in the minds of both Mexicans and foreigners. They present a glimpse, passing moments of what Mexico has been and what it is. His frames are clusters of symbols that represent Mexico, from the stars Pedro Armendariz, Maria Felix, Dolores del Rio, Columba Dominguez, Miguel Inclan, Carlos Lopez Moctezuma Silvia Pinal, to the unknown extras, from the monuments, churches, and roads, to the fields, mountains, and run down apartments. Politicians, revolutionary generals, humble indians, and cabaret dancers all populate with equal importance a world that is Mexican, but more specifically, el Indio’s Mexico. They’re the parts that he employed to create an image for a country, for as he would state late in his career: “There is only one Mexico: the one I invented.”

(more writing on el Indio to come later)

HELP ME :)
I have obtained 23 of el Indio’s films and know that 11 others exist in some way or another. The following 8 I have not been able to locate anywhere and would appreciate any info on finding them:

La isla de la pasion, 1942
Duelo en las montañas, 1950
Acapulco, 1952
Cuando levanta la niebla, 1952
La rosa blanca, 1954
Nosotros dos, 1955
La Tierra del Fuego se apaga, 1955
Mexico Norte, 1979

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