For a better experience on MUBI, update your browser.

ENTRE GEISHAS, SAMURAIS, MONSTRUOS Y YAKUZAS TE VEAS : OZU, MIZOGUCHI, NARUSE, Y LOS PRIMEROS MAESTROS DEL CINE JAPONÉS.

by VENIMOS LOS JODIMOS Y NOS FUIMOS
ENTRE GEISHAS, SAMURAIS, MONSTRUOS Y YAKUZAS TE VEAS : OZU, MIZOGUCHI, NARUSE, Y LOS PRIMEROS MAESTROS DEL CINE JAPONÉS. by VENIMOS LOS JODIMOS Y NOS FUIMOS
The kinetoscope, first shown commercially by Thomas Edison in the United States in 1894, was first shown in Japan in November 1896. The Vitascope and the Lumière Brothers’ Cinematograph were first presented in Japan in March 1897, and Lumière cameramen were the first to shoot films in Japan.Moving pictures, however, were not an entirely new experience for the Japanese because of their rich tradition of pre-cinematic devices such as gentō (utsushi-e) or the magic lantern.The first successful Japanese film in late 1897 showed sights in Tokyo. In 1898 some ghost films were made, the Shirō Asano shorts Bake Jizo (Jizo the Spook / 化け地蔵) and… Read more

The kinetoscope, first shown commercially by Thomas Edison in the United States in 1894, was first shown in Japan in November 1896. The Vitascope and the Lumière Brothers’ Cinematograph were first presented in Japan in March 1897, and Lumière cameramen were the first to shoot films in Japan.Moving pictures, however, were not an entirely new experience for the Japanese because of their rich tradition of pre-cinematic devices such as gentō (utsushi-e) or the magic lantern.The first successful Japanese film in late 1897 showed sights in Tokyo.
In 1898 some ghost films were made, the Shirō Asano shorts Bake Jizo (Jizo the Spook / 化け地蔵) and Shinin no sosei (Resurrection of a Corpse). The first documentary, the short Geisha no teodori (芸者の手踊り), was made in June 1899. Tsunekichi Shibata made a number of early films, including Momijigari, a 1899 record of two famous actors performing a scene from a well-known kabuki play. Early films were influenced by traditional theater – for example, kabuki and bunraku.

At the dawn of the twentieth century theaters in Japan hired benshi, storytellers who sat next to the screen and narrated silent movies. They were descendants of kabuki jōruri, kōdan storytellers, theater barkers and other forms of oral storytelling. Benshi could be accompanied by music like silent films from cinema of the West. With the advent of sound in the early 1930s, the benshi gradually disappeared.
In 1908, Shōzō Makino, considered the pioneering director of Japanese film, began his influential career with Honnōji gassen (本能寺合戦), produced for Yokota Shōkai. Shōzō recruited Matsunosuke Onoe, a former kabuki actor, to star in his productions. Onoe became Japan’s first film star, appearing in over 1,000 films, mostly shorts, between 1909 and 1926. The pair pioneered the jidaigeki genre. Tokihiko Okada was a popular romantic lead of the same era.

The first female Japanese performer to appear in a film professionally was the dancer/actress Tokuko Nagai Takagi, who appeared in four shorts for the American-based Thanhouser Company between 1911 and 1914. Most early Japanese cinema theatres employed benshi, narrators whose dramatic readings accompanied the film and its musical score. As in the West, the score was often performed live.

Among intellectuals, critiques of Japanese cinema grew in the 1910s and eventually developed into a movement that transformed Japanese film. Film criticism began with early film magazines such as Katsudō shashinkai (begun in 1909) and a full-length book written by Yasunosuke Gonda in 1914, but many early film critics often focused on chastising the work of studios like Nikkatsu and Tenkatsu for being too theatrical (using, for instance, elements from kabuki and shinpa such as onnagata) and for not utilizing what were considered more cinematic techniques to tell stories, instead relying on benshi. In what was later named the Pure Film Movement, writers in magazines such as Kinema Record called for a broader use of such cinematic techniques. Some of these critics, such as Norimasa Kaeriyama, went on to put their ideas into practice by directing such films as The Glow of Life (1918). There were parallel efforts elsewhere in the film industry. In his 1917 film The Captain’s Daughter, Masao Inoue started using techniques new to the silent film era, such as the close-up and cut back. The Pure Film Movement was central in the development of the gendaigeki and scriptwriting. New studios established around 1920, such as Shochiku and Taikatsu, aided the cause for reform. At Taikatsu, Thomas Kurihara directed films scripted by the novelist Junichiro Tanizaki, who was a strong advocate of film reform. Even Nikkatsu produced reformist films under the direction of Eizō Tanaka. By the mid-1920s, actresses had replaced onnagata and films used more of the devices pioneered by Inoue. Some of the most discussed silent films from Japan are those of Kenji Mizoguchi, whose later works (e.g., The Life of Oharu) are still highly regarded.


A wiew of the Korona theatre. Korona was established in 1926 in the Aichi prefecture (Japan) as a single movie theater. This served as the foundation for the biggest independent cinema company in Japan, operating 17 cinema complexes 158 screens – including karaoke halls, restaurants, bowling alleys, coffee shops and spas – around the country. The total workforce numbers 5,000 people.

Japanese films gained popularity in the mid-1920s against foreign films, in part fueled by the popularity of movie stars and a new style of jidaigeki. Directors such as Daisuke Itō and Masahiro Makino made samurai films like A Diary of Chuji’s Travels and Roningai featuring rebellious antiheroes in fast-cut fight scenes that were both critically acclaimed and commercial successes. Some stars, such as Tsumasaburo Bando, Kanjūrō Arashi, Chiezō Kataoka, Takako Irie and Utaemon Ichikawa, were inspired by Makino Film Productions and formed their own independent production companies where directors such as Hiroshi Inagaki, Mansaku Itami and Sadao Yamanaka honed their skills. Director Teinosuke Kinugasa created a production company to produce the experimental masterpiece A Page of Madness, starring Masao Inoue, in 1926. Many of these companies, while surviving during the silent era against major studios like Nikkatsu, Shochiku, Teikine, and Toa Studios, could not survive the cost involved in converting to sound.

With the rise of left-wing political movements and labor unions at the end of the 1920s arose so-called tendency films with left-wing “tendencies”, with prominent examples being directed by Kenji Mizoguchi, Daisuke Itō, Shigeyoshi Suzuki, and Tomu Uchida. In contrast with these commercially produced 35 mm films, the Marxist Proletarian Film League of Japan (Prokino) made works independently in smaller gauges (such as 9.5mm and 16mm), with more radical intentions. Tendency films suffered from severe censorship heading into the 1930s, and Prokino members were arrested and the movement effectively crushed. Such moves by the government had profound effects on the expression of political dissent in 1930s cinema. Films from this period include: Sakanaya Honda, Jitsuroku Chushingura, Horaijima, Orochi, Maboroshi, Kurutta Ippeji, Jujiro, Kurama Tengu: Kyōfu Jidai, and Kurama Tengu.

A later version of The Captain’s Daughter was one of the first talkie films. It used the Mina Talkie System. The Japanese film industry later split into two groups; one retained the Mina Talkie System, while the other used the Iisutofyon Talkie System used to make Tojo Masaki’s films.
The 1923 earthquake, the bombing of Tokyo during World War II, and the natural effects of time and Japan’s humidity on inflammable and unstable nitrate film have resulted in a great dearth of surviving films from this period.

Unlike in the West, silent films were still being produced in Japan well into the 1930s. A few Japanese sound shorts were made in the 1920s and 1930s, but Japan’s first feature-length talkie was Fujiwara Yoshie no furusato (1930), which used the Mina Talkie System. Notable talkies of this period include Mikio Naruse’s Wife, Be Like A Rose! (Tsuma Yo Bara No Yoni, 1935), which was one of the first Japanese films to gain a theatrical release in the U.S.; Yasujirō Ozu’s An Inn in Tokyo, considered a precursor to the neorealism genre; Kenji Mizoguchi’s Sisters of the Gion (Gion no shimai, 1936); Osaka Elegy (1936); and The Story of the Last Chrysanthemums (1939); and Sadao Yamanaka’s Humanity and Paper Balloons (1937).

The 1930s also saw increased government involvement in cinema, which was symbolized by the passing of the Film Law, which gave the state more authority over the film industry, in 1939. The government encouraged some forms of cinema, producing propaganda films and promoting documentary films (also called bunka eiga or “culture films”), with important documentaries being made by directors such as Fumio Kamei.19 Realism was in favor; film theorists such as Taihei Imamura advocated for documentary, while directors such as Hiroshi Shimizu and Tomotaka Tasaka produced fiction films that were strongly realistic in style.

JIRAIYA THE HERO
GOKETSU JIRAIYA
Japón
1921
21 Min
Black and White
Muda

DIR Shôzô Makino
DP Minoru Miki
CAST Matsunosuke Onoe, Suminojo Ichikawa, Kijaku Otani, Chosei Kataoka, Shoen Kataoka, Enichiro Jitsukawa, Ichitaro Kataoka, Masatada Makino
New York (Masterworks)

Una curiosa muestra de cine vintage fantástico japonés, en el qué el director Shozo Makino llevó a la pantalla grande un capitulo de las aventuras del personaje titular (una especie de equivalente nipón de Robin Hood, con la habilidad de volar, transformarse en hongo, en rana, o desaparecer a voluntad) muy popular en el folclor literario del país asiatico, y un tema recurrente del teatro Kabuki. Además del ingeniosamente logrado nivel de los efectos especiales y su imagineria visual, este film tiene la importancia de ser uno de los pocos trabajos de Matsunosuke Onoe (uno de los actores más célebres en la historia del cine japonés) que ha logrado perdurar hasta nuestros días.

SERPENT
OROCHI
Japan
1925
74 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Silent

DIR Buntaro Futagawa
SCR Rokuhei Susukita
DP Seizo Ishino
CAST Tsumasaburô Bandô, Misao Seki, Utako Tamaki, Kensaku Haruji, Shigeyo Arashi, Shizuko Mori, Kinnosuke Nakamura, Yoshimatsu Nakamura, Momotaro Yamamura, Zen’ichiro Yasuda

A PAGE OF MADNESS
KURUTTA IPPÊJI
Japón
1926
59 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Ninguno

DIR Teinosuke Kinugasa
PROD Teinosuke Kinugasa
SCR Teinosuke Kinugasa, Yasunari Kawabata, Minoru Inuzuka
DP Teinosuke Kinugasa
CAST Masuo Inoue, Yoshie Nakagawa, Ayako lijima, Hiroshi Nemoto, Misao Seki
PROD DES Chiyo Ozaki

Extraordinario film de la primera etapa de Teinosuke Kinugasa, considerado por muchos como “el caligari japonés”, por su tema y el estilo visual y narrativo escogido por el director para contar una historia a medio camino entre el drama y el terror psicologico. Cabe destacar los notables juegos de luces y sombras, además de la compleja estructura del film (con asociaciones psicologico/simbolicas a veces dificiles de seguir). Como muchas de las peliculas japonesas perdidas ó destruidas durante la segunda guerra mundial, se creyó perdido el film por casi 50 años, hasta que el propio Kinugasa encontró una copia en su jardinera, gracias a lo cual, el mundo tuvó acceso nuevamente a esta desconcertante y magistral obra.

KENJI MIZOGUCHI.

Nace en Tokio el 16 de mayo de 1898 y fallece en Kioto el 24 de agosto de 1956. Mizoguchi se acercó por primera vez a las artes plásticas durante su etapa como estudiante en el Instituto de Pintura Occidental Aohashi, en Tokio. En 1913 se formó en las técnicas del diseño textil, interesándose por las prácticas tradicionales en la elaboración de tejidos. La muerte de su madre, a quien se sentía especialmente unido, fue una de las principales tragedias de su vida. Este hecho marcó en cierta medida su futura existencia.

Trasladó su vivienda a Kobe, donde comenzó a trabajar como ilustrador de periódicos. La hermana de Mizoguchi fue geisha, una actividad que atrajo particularmente al futuro director. Fascinado por las artes de seducción femeninas, se mostró interesado por la vida privada de las cortesanas, un asunto que en adelante fue uno de los argumentos característicos de su cinematografía. Buscó trabajo en los rodajes que promovía la compañía Nikkatsu y lo consiguió gracias a un antiguo profesor suyo. Logró un primer empleo en este campo como ayudante del director Osamu Wakayama. Tras un rápido aprendizaje comenzó a dirigir, con lo que su universo personal se movió a partir de ese momento en el entorno de las filmaciones.

Lo cierto es que Kenji Mizoguchi, como admirador del arte occidental, reconoció desde el primer momento la influencia extranjera en su formación, aunque la mayor parte de su obra se inscriba dentro del género histórico, aparentemente más cercano a las esencias japonesas. Precisamente este género cinematográfico es el que más frecuentó en los años de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Las autoridades imperiales vieron con buenos ojos sus relatos épicos como La venganza de los 47 samurais. Por otro lado, ello no comprometió políticamente al realizador más adelante, cuando la censura de las fuerzas de ocupación impusieron diferentes normas ideológicas.

La guerra concluyó dramáticamente para Japón. El general McArthur impuso un nuevo orden que cambió la vida de todos los ciudadanos del país. Los creadores cinematográficos encontraron entonces una nueva oportunidad para narrar historias ajenas al militarismo. Mizoguchi aprovechó esta coyuntura para desarrollar en la pantalla su pasión por la intimidad femenina. Películas como La victoria de las mujeres (1946), Cinco mujeres alrededor de Utamaro (1947) y Mujeres en la noche (1948) acreditan este interés.

En la mayoría de sus filmes, los personajes femeninos se ven reducidos a la condición de prostitutas. Sin embargo, pese a la presión masculina, desarrollan una vida interior intensa, valiente y llena de espiritualidad. Generalmente el destino acaba resultando trágico para este tipo de figuras, pero en la memoria de los espectadores queda su encanto personal, lleno de matices. Películas como La dama de Musashino (1951) refuerzan este modelo particular. Por otro lado, se trata de personajes de un fuerte sensualidad, que incluso pueden llevar la fatalidad a los personajes masculinos. Ese doble rostro de madre y cortesana es aplicable a la mayoría de las mujeres del cine de Mizoguchi.

Se ha dicho repetidamente que Mizoguchi se acerca al cine desde una perspectiva literaria, y ello es cierto. De hecho, varios de sus primeros trabajos son adaptaciones más o menos enmascaradas de novelas y obras teatrales. No se trata, sin embargo, de escritos tradicionales japoneses. Por el contrario, las mayores influencias en este sentido llegan al cine de Mizoguchi desde Occidente, pues el realizador era un lector ávido de literatura europea y norteamericana. El esteticismo de su puesta en escena tiene que ver con su formación pictórica. Mizoguchi, ya desde sus primeros filmes, plantea la filmación como un ejercicio de ilustración. Compone meticulosamente los encuadres, de forma que sean bellos independientemente de su posterior montaje.

Ha sido un lugar común oponer la obra de Mizoguchi y la de Akira Kurosawa, y se ha destacado a este último como el más occidentalizado frente a la pureza tradicional del primero. En 1952 su película Vida de Oharu, mujer galante fue premiada en el Festival de Venecia. Este relato atormentado viene a ser un resumen de su visión del mundo de las pasiones. La protagonista sigue una trayectoria tortuosa por causa del deseo masculino, motivo de sufrimiento y, finalmente, de perdición.

El reconocimiento internacional no cambió sus hábitos de vida. Fueron los años de plenitud creativa. Dirigió Cuentos de la luna pálida de agosto (1953), El intendente Sansho (1954), La emperatriz Yang Kwei-fei (1955) y La calle de la vergüenza (1956). Cada una de estas películas puede figurar, por méritos propios, en cualquier listado de los mejores filmes de la historia del cine. Curiosamente, la última de ellas no se ambienta en épocas pasadas, sino en un presente oscuro. Las protagonistas, un grupo de prostitutas, quizá sean el reflejo de algunas de las mujeres que Mizoguchi ha conocido en sus paseos por los barrios marginales. Sin duda, se trata de una película tan hermosa como las anteriormente citadas, pese a no contar con la brillantez escenográfica del Medioevo japonés.

Tan asombrosa concentración de talento en apenas tres años no parece anunciar lo peor. Mizoguchi estaba enfermo, padecía leucemia y su vida no podía prolongarse por mucho tiempo. Aunque sus colaboradores lo ignoraban, él sabía perfectamente que le quedaban pocos meses de vida. El mal se agravó súbitamente mientras preparaba un nuevo rodaje. Murió en Kioto en 1956. Tras su fallecimiento, lo más granado del cine japonés le rindió homenaje.

THE SONG OF HOME
FURUSATO NO UTA
Japan
1925
45 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Silent, Japanese

DIR Kenji Mizoguchi
SCR Ryunosuke Shimizu
DP Tatsuyuki Yokota
CAST Sueko Ito, Shiro Kato, Kentaro Kawamata, Hiromichi Kawata, Shigeru Kido, Shizue Matsumoto, Yutaka Mimasu, Ichiro Shibayama, Michiko Tachibana, Masujiro Takagi, Mineko Tsuji

New York (Masterworks)

Un chico de pueblo, con gran talento, sueña con vivir y estudiar en Tokio, como hacen otros chavales de su localidad, aunque sus padres no tienen dinero para enviarle a la ciudad.

TOKYO MARCH
TOKYO KOSHINKYOKU
Japan
1929
29 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Japanese

DIR Kenji Mizoguchi
SCR Shuichi Hatamoto, Chiio Kimura, Kan Kikuchi
DP Tatsuyuki Yokota
CAST Reiji Ichiki, Takako Irie, Takaya Ito, Gunnosuke Kanahira, Shunji Kanda, Isamu Kosugi, Bontarô Miake, Shozo Nanbu, Shizue Natsukawa, Taeko Sakuma

OKICHI, MISTRESS OF A FOREIGNER
Japan
1930
1.33: 1
Black & White

DIR Kenji Mizoguchi
CAST Yôko Umemura.
Surviving fragment from film.

THE WATER MAGICIAN
TAKI NO SHIRAITO
Japón
1933
110 Min
Black and White
Japonés

DIR Kenji Mizoguchi
PROD Takako Irie, Yoshizo Mogi, Takejiro Tsunoda
SCR Yasunaga Higashibojo, Kyoka Izumi, Shinji Masuda, Nariharu Sugano, Kennosuke Tateoka
DP Minoru Miki
CAST Takako Irie, Tokihiko Okada, Nobuo Kosaka, Bontarô Miyake, Kôju Murata
ED Tatsuko Sakane
PROD DES Shichiro Nishi.

Shiraito es una joven mujer independiente que se gana la vida como malabarista junto a una compañía teatral. Un día conoce a Murakoshi, un huérfano conductor de carruajes, del cual se enamora, una relación que acarreará consigo trágicas consecuencias para los dos amantes años más tarde. Esta película muda dirigida por Kenji Mizoguchi en colaboración con Takumei Seiryo, es de los pocos trabajos del primer periodo de su obra en llegar hasta nuestros días. Versión Benshí.

OYUKI THE VIRGIN
MARIA NO OYUKI
Japón
1935
78 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Japonés

DIR Kenji Mizoguchi
SCR Guy de Maupassant, Matsutaro Kawaguchi, Tatsunosuke Takashima
DP Minoru Miki
CAST Komako Hara, Yoshisuke Koizumi, Eiji Nakano, Daijirô Natsukawa, Toichiro Negishi, Keiji Oizumi, Arata Shibata, Shizuko Takizawa, Tadashi Torii, Yoko Umemura, Kinue Utagawa, Isuzu Yamada
ED Junkichi Ishigi
MUSIC Koichi Takagi
SOUND Junichi Murota

Basada en ‘Bola de Sebo’, la historia de Maupassant que también inspiró ‘La diligencia’ de John Ford, ‘Oyuki, the Virgin’ es la historia de un grupo de personas que tratan de huir de una batalla en un carruaje de caballos. Cuando son atrapados por el enemigo, ofrecen a una prostituta que viaja con ellos a modo de trato para salvarse.

POPPIES
GUBIJINSÔ
Japan
1935
72 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Japanese

DIR Kenji Mizoguchi
PROD Masaichi Nagata
SCR Daisuke Itô, Natsume Sōseki, Haruo Takayanagi
DP Minoru Miki
CAST Yukichi Iwata, Kasuke Koizumi, Kuniko Miyake, Daijirô Natsukawa, Toichiro Negishi, Ayako Nijo, Chiyoko Okura, Kazuyoshi Takeda, Mitsugu Terajima, Ichirô Tsukida, Yoko Umemura
ED Tatsuko Sakane
PROD DES Goro Hisamitsu, Hichiro Nishi, Gonshiro Saito
MUSIC Koichi Takagi
SOUND Yasumi Mizuguchi, Tatsuki Murita, Yosinosuke Takeuchi

Este melodrama fue la producción aniversario de Dai-ichi Eiga, una empresa en graves dificultades financieras que no había tenido una película exitosa en varios años. La elección de este proyecto y su director no eran precisamente una garantía de éxito en aquel entonces, pero a pesar de ello, Mizoguchi disfrutó de la confianza de los maltrechos estudios y, lo más importante, de un espléndido presupuesto para esta película como no se había acostumbrado en otros proyectos similares, lo que no evitó que la película fuese un rotundo fracaso durante su estreno ni el posterior cierre de la Dai-ichi

SISTERS OF THE GION
GION NO SHIMAI
Japón
1936
69 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Japonés

DIR Kenji Mizoguchi
PROD Masaichi Nagata
SCR Yoshikata Yoda
DP Minoru Miki
CAST Isuzu Yamada, Yoko Umemura, Shiganoya Bendo, Kazuko Hisano, Fumio Okura, Taizo Fukami, Eitarô Shindô, Sakurako Iwama, Somenosuke Hayashiya, Reiko Aoi, Shizuko Takizawa, Kozo Tachibana
ED Tatsuko Sakane

Las hermanas Omocha y Umekichi son dos geishas que viven en el barrio de Gion, en Kioto. Encarnan dos polos opuestos de la mujer japonesa: mientras Omocha es una chica moderna, Umekichi sigue siendo una tradicional mujer japonesa. Este contraste se agudiza cuando el negocio del mercader Furusawa, su protector y cliente habitual, quiebra.

YASUJIRÔ OZU.

(Tokyo, 1903 – 1963) Director de cine japonés. Rodó su primera película en 1927, cuando aún era un joven con poca paciencia para los estudios formales pero un apasionado de los filmes de Hollywood. En los años 30 era uno de los directores más populares de Japón. Sus filmes casi siempre versan sobre la vida y los problemas de las familias japonesas de clase media.

Su estilo es exquisito por su simplicidad; técnicamente se caracteriza por tomar los planos con la cámara fija desde un ángulo bajo, a un metro del suelo, que corresponde al nivel de la mirada de un adulto japonés sentado en cuclillas en un cojín, postura que adoptan sus personajes atados a las tradiciones.

Rodó 54 películas, muy consistentes en cuanto al medio, el tema y el estilo. En Japón pronto sus obras se hicieron acreedoras de muchos premios; y, a partir de los años 50, el cine de Yasujiro Ozu fue también muy admirado en Occidente.

Entre sus principales películas destacan Y sin embargo hemos nacido (1932), Fantasía pasajera (1934), Los hermanos de la familia Toda (1941), Primavera tardía (1949), Cuentos de Tokio (1953), Primavera temprana (1956), Buenos días (1959), Otoño tardío (1960) y El sabor del sake (1962).

I GRADUATED, BUT
DAIGAKU WA DETA KEREDO
Japón
1929
12 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Muda, Japonés

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Hiroshi Shimizu, Yoshio Aramaki
DP Hideo Shigehara
CAST Minoru Takada, Kinuyo Tanaka, Utako Suzuki, Kenji Oyama, Shin’ichi Himori, Kenji Kimura, Takeshi Sakamoto, Chôko Iida

DAYS OF YOUTH
WAKAKI HI
Japan
1929
103 Min
Black and White
Japanese, Silent

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Akira Fushimi, Yasujirô Ozu
DP Hideo Shigehara
CAST Ichirô Yuki, Tatsuo Saitô, Junko Matsui, Shin’ichi Himori, Chôko Iida
ED Hideo Shigehara
New York (Special Events)

A STRAIGHTFORWARD BOY
TOKKAN KOZO
Japan
1929
14 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Japanese

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR O. Henry, Kôgo Noda, Tadao Ikeda, Okubo Tadamoto
DP Hiroshi Nomura
CAST Tatsuo Saitô, Tomio Aoki, Takeshi Sakamoto

TOKYO CHORUS
TOKYO NO KÔRASU
Japan
1931
90 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Japanese

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Komatsu Kitamura, Kôgo Noda
DP Hideo Shigehara
CAST Tokihiko Okada, Emiko Yagumo, Hideo Sugawara, Hideko Takamine, Tatsuo Saitô, Chouko Iida
ED Hideo Shigehara
New York (Special Events)

WHERE NOW ARE THE DREAMS OF YOUTH?
SEISHUN NO YUME IMA IZUKO
Japan
1932
85 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Silent

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Kôgo Noda
DP Hideo Shigehara
CAST Ureo Egawa, Kinuyo Tanaka, Tatsuo Saitô, Haruo Takeda, Ryotaro Mizushima, Kenji Oyama, Chishû Ryû, Takeshi Sakamoto, Chôko Iida, Ayako Katsuragi, Satoko Date, Kaoru Futaba
ED Hideo Shigehara

I WAS BORN, BUT
OTONA NO MIRU EHONUMARETE WA MITA KEREDO
Japan
1932
100 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Japanese

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Akira Fushimi
DP Hideo Shigehara
CAST Tatsuo Saitô, Tokkan Kozou, Hideo Sugawara, Mitsuko Yoshikawa, Takeshi Sakamoto, Teruyo Hayami
ED Hideo Shigehara
New York (Special Events)

DRAGNET GIRL
HIJOSEN NO ONNA
Japan
1933
100 Min
Black and White
Silent

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Tadao Ikeda
DP Hideo Mohara
CAST Kinuyo Tanaka, Joji Oka, Sumiko Mizukubo, Kôji Mitsui, Yumeko Aizome, Yoshio Takayama, Koji Kaga, Yasuo Nanjo, Chishû Ryû
ED Kazuo Ishikawa, Minoru Kuribayashi
PROD DES Yonekazu Wakita
New York (Special Events), San Sebastián (Thematic retrospective. JAPANESE FILM NOIR)

A MOTHER SHOULD BE LOVED
HAHA O KOWAZU YA
Japan
1934
71 Min
Black and White
1.37:1

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Kôgo Noda, Tadao Ikeda, Masao Arata, Shuutarou Komiya
DP Isamu Aoki
CAST Yukichi Iwata, Mitsuko Yoshikawa, Den Obinata, Seiichi Kato, Kôji Mitsui, Shusei Nomura, Shinyo Nara, Shinobu Aoki, Kyôko Mitsukawa, Chishû Ryû, Yumeko Aizome, Junko Matsui, Chôko Iida

A STORY OF FLOATING WEEDS
UKIGUSA MONOGATARI
Japan
1934
86 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Japanese

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Yasujirô Ozu, Tadao Ikeda
DP Hideo Mohara
CAST Takeshi Sakamoto, Chôko Iida, Kôji Mitsui, Rieko Yagumo, Yoshiko Tsubouchi, Tokkan Kozo, Reiko Tani
ED Hideo Mohara

Melbourne (Missed Masterpieces), New York (Special Events)

img src=http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m9zfbs1doQ1rufx0zo1_400.jpg>

AN INN IN TOKYO
TÔKYÔ NO YADO
Japan
1935
80 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Silent, Japanese

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Masao Arata, Tadao Ikeda
DP Hideo Shigehara
CAST Takeshi Sakamoto, Yoshiko Okada, Chôko Iida, Tomio Aoki, Kazuko Ojima, Chishû Ryû, Takayuki Suematsu
ED Hideo Shigehara
MUSIC Keizo Horiuchi
New York (Special Events)

WOMAN OF TOKYO
TOKYO NO ONNA
Japan
1933
47 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Silent, Japanese

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Tadao Ikeda, Kôgo Noda
DP Hideo Shigehara
CAST Yoshiko Okada, Ureo Egawa, Kinuyo Tanaka, Shinyo Nara, Chishû Ryû
ED Kazuo Ishikawa
New York (Special Events)

PASSING FANCY
DEKIGOKORO
Japan
1933
101 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Japanese

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Tadao Ikeda
DP Hideo Shigehara
CAST Takeshi Sakamoto, Tokkan Kozou, Nobuko Fushimi, Den Obinata, Chouko Iida
ED Kazuo Ishikawa
New York (Special Events)

THE LION DANCE
KAGAMIJISHI
Japón
1936
25 Min
Black and White
Japonés

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Kenji Shuzui
DP Hideo Shigehara
CAST Kikugoro Onoe, Kinjirou Onoe, Shigeru Onoe, Wafuu Matsunaga, Shinzou Fujita, Izaburou Kashiwa, Tazaemon Morotsuki, Junji Masuda

THE ONLY SON
HITORI MUSUKO
Japan
1936
82 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Japanese

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Yasujirô Ozu, Tadao Ikeda, Masao Arata
DP Shojiro Sugimoto
CAST Chôko Iida, Shin’ichi Himori, Masao Hayama, Yoshiko Tsubouchi, Mitsuko Yoshikawa, Chishû Ryû, Tomoko Naniwa, Bakudankozo, Kiyoshi Seino, Eiko Takamatsu, Seiichi Kato, Kazuo Kojima, Tomio Aoki
PROD DES Tatsuo Hamada
MUSIC Senji Itô
SOUND Hideo Mohara, Eiichi Hesegawa, Eiichi Hasegawa, Masao Irie, Mikio Jinbo, Sachio Koyano, Hiroshi Kumagai, Musaburô Saitô, Matsuo Sekihara, Hideo Shigehara, Noriharu Yoshikawa
New York (Special Events)

THE ROAD I TRAVEL WITH YOU
Japan
1936
70 Min
Black and white
1.33: 1
Japanese

DIR Yasujiro Ozu

WHAT DID THE LADY FORGET?
SHUKUJO WA NANI O WASURETA KA
Japan
1937
71 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Japanese

DIR Yasujirô Ozu
SCR Akira Fushimi, Yasujirô Ozu
DP Yûharu Atsuta, Hideo Shigehara
CAST Sumiko Kurishima, Tatsuo Saitô, Michiko Kuwano, Shûji Sano, Takeshi Sakamoto, Chôko Iida, Ken Uehara, Mitsuko Yoshikawa, Masao Hayama, Tomio Aoki
ED Kenkichi Hara
MUSIC Senji Itô
New York (Special Events)

HIROSHI SHIMIZU

SEVEN SEAS PART 1 : VIRGINITY
Japan
1932
60 Min
Black and white
1.33: 1
Silent

DIR Hiroshi Shimizu

SEVEN SEAS PART 2 : FRIGIDITY
Japan
1932
67 Min
Black and white
1.33: 1
Silent

DIR Hiroshi Shimizu

JAPANESE GIRLS AT THE HARBOR
MINATO NO NIHON MUSUME
Japan
1933
76 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Japanese

DIR Hiroshi Shimizu
DP Taro Sasaki
CAST Oikawa Michiko, Yukiko Inoue, Ranko Sawa, Ureo Egawa, Tatsuo Saitô, Yumako Aizome
Berlinale

MR. THANK YOU
ARIGATO-SAN
Japan
1936
78 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Japanese

DIR Hiroshi Shimizu
SCR Hiroshi Shimizu
DP Isamu Aoki
CAST Ken Uehara, Michiko Kuwano, Mayumi Tsukiji, Kaoru Futaba, Setsuko Shinobu, Ryuji Ishiyama
MUSIC Keizo Horiuchi
SOUND Haruo Dobashi, Kaname Hashimoto
Berlinale (Forum)

THE MASSEURS AND A WOMAN
ANMA TO ONNA
Japan
1938
76 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Japanese

DIR Hiroshi Shimizu
SCR Hiroshi Shimizu
DP Masao Saito
CAST Mieko Takamine, Shin Tokudaiji, Shin’ichi Himori, Bakudan Kozo, Shin Saburi
PROD DES Minoru Esaka
MUSIC Senji Itô

INTROSPECTION TOWER
MIKAHERI NO TOU
Japan
1941
112 Min
Black and White
Japanese

DIR Hiroshi Shimizu
DP Suketaro Inokai
CAST Teruo Furuya, Keiko Izumi, Kuniko Miyake, Shinyo Nara, Yuiko Nomura, Ryô Ôfuji, Takashi Ogata, Kimiyo Otsuka, Norio Otsuka, Chishû Ryû, Takeshi Sakamoto, Jun Yokoyama
PROD DES Minoru Esaka
MUSIC Senji Itô

MIKIO NARUSE

Mikio Naruse nació en Tokio en 1905, sólo diez años después de la invención del cine. Su padre era un estoico artesano, hijo de un samurái. Dado que su familia era pobre, Naruse tuvo que estudiar en una escuela de formación profesional con el fin de hacerse mecánico. Al morir su padre en 1920, entró a trabajar a los quince años en el departamento de atrezzo del estudio Kamata de la Shochiku. Naruse contaría después que cogió ese empleo para poder ganarse la vida y no porque sintiera ningún deseo de trabajar en el cine. A partir de 1934, y por intermediación de Sanezumi Fujimoto, Naruse cambió de productora, pasando a trabajar para la Toho, considerada la primera productora moderna del Japón. En esta compañía, el talento de Mikio Naruse floreció de forma notable. Sólo en el año 1935 adaptó una historia original de Yasunari Kawabata, Tres hermanas de corazón puro y rodó otras cuatro películas habladas, destacando: ¡Esposa!, ¡Sé como una rosa! y La chica en boca de todos. En 1937, justo en su momento de gloria, se casó con la actriz Sachiko Chiba, que había protagonizado algunas de sus películas. Pero al cabo de tres años el matrimonio se rompió. En cuanto a su filmografía, el contexto bélico obligaba a los estudios a producir películas propagandísticas y afines al régimen militarista del gobierno japonés. Por ello, el habitual estilo melodramático de Naruse se vio resentido, aunque nunca llegará a renunciar a él. Sus películas, en gran parte, se basan en los relatos de Fumiko Hayashi, adaptados con la participación de mujeres guionistas como Sumie Tanaka y Yoko Mizuki. Naruse eliminaba todo lo que podía de los literarios guiones de estas escritoras, ya que prefería utilizar técnicas dramáticas que se apoyaran en las miradas y en el lenguaje corporal, antes que recurrir a tales diálogos. Dichas técnicas, resultaban posibles y operativos, gracias a la larga experiencia de Naruse en el cine mudo. En sus obras, también cabría destacar el excelente papel de actrices como Setsuko Hara y Hideko Takamine. La producción de Naruse en la década de los cincuenta, se podría resumir en los siguientes títulos: Okuni y Gohei (1952), El relámpago (1952), Hermano mayor, hermana menor (1953), Crisantemos tardíos (1954), La voz de la montaña (1954), A la deriva (1955), Una mujer indomable (1957), Anzukko (1958), además de la participación de su equipo de cámara, iluminación y dirección artística en la superproducción de ciencia ficción Godzilla (1954), película que dirigió Honda.
En 1969, Naruse moría a los 63 años.

FLUNKY, WORK HARD!
KOSHIBEN GAMBARE
Japan
1931
38 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Silent

DIR Mikio Naruse
SCR Mikio Naruse
DP Mitsuo Miura
CAST Shizue Akiyama, Seiichi Kato, Tomoko Naniwa, Tokio Seki, Hideo Sugawara, Isamu Yamaguchi

NO BLOOD RELATION
NASANUNAKA
Japan
1932
79 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Silent

DIR Mikio Naruse
SCR Shunyo Yanagawa, Kôgo Noda
DP Eijirô Fujita, Suketaro Inokai, Masao Saito
CAST Yoshiko Okada, Shinyo Nara, Yukiko Tsukuba, Toshiko Kojima, Fumiko Katsuragi, Joji Oka, Ichirô Yuki
PROD DES Tatsuo Hamada
Berlinale (Retrospective)

EVERY-NIGHT DREAMS
YOGOTO NO YUME
Japan
1933
64 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Silent

DIR Mikio Naruse
SCR Tadao Ikeda
DP Suketaro Inokai
CAST Sumiko Kurishima, Teruko Kojima, Tatsuo Saitô, Jun Arai, Mitsuko Yoshikawa
PROD DES Tatsuo Hamada
MUSIC Masao Koga

Un trabajo temprano de Mikio Naruse, en el que se narra la historia de una mujer, la cual presta sus servicios como anfitriona en un antro de poca monta. Dueña de un recio carácter y un cinismo aparente, en realidad, se trata de la amorosa madre de un niño enfermo, quién no sólo debe lidiar con su difícil situación económica y laboral, sino con el repentino regreso del padre del niño. Un estupendo film de Naruse, y una buena muestra del dinamismo y habilidad característicos del director durante su etapa silente.

APART FROM YOU
KIMI TO WAKARETE
Japan
1933
60 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Silent

DIR Mikio Naruse
SCR Mikio Naruse
DP Suketaro Inokai
CAST Mitsuko Yoshikawa, Sumiko Mizukubo, Akio Isono, Reikichi Kawamura, Ryuko Fuji
PROD DES Tatsuo Hamada

STREET WITHOUT END
KAGIRINAKI HODO
Japan
1934
87 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Silent

DIR Mikio Naruse
SCR Jitsuzo Ikeda, Komatsu Kitamura
DP Suketaro Inokai
CAST Setsuko Shinobu, Akio Isono, Chiyoko Katori, Ichirô Yuki, Hikaru Yamanouchi, Nobuko Wakaba, Ayako Katsuragi, Shin’ichi Himori
PROD DES Jokichi Shu

La vida de Sugiko, quién trabaja como mesera en un pequeño café, da un giro de 180° cuando es atropellada accidentalmente por un acaudalado hombre de negocios, quién decide hacerse cargo de la recuperación de la muchacha, con el consiguiente romance y problemas entre ambos. Detrás de su apariencia de logrado entretenimiento melodramático, este cinta de Mikio Naruse (su última película silente) resulta una corrosiva mirada critica a las desigualdades y el entorno social del Japón de los años 30.

THE ACTRESS AND THE POET
JOYÛ TO SHIJIN
Japan
1935
73 Min
Black and White
1.33:1
Japanese

DIR Mikio Naruse
SCR Ryuji Nagami, Minoru Nakano
DP Hiroshi Suzuki
CAST Sachiko Chiba, Hiroshi Uruki, Kamatari Fujiwara, Kimba Sanyutei, Haruko Toda, Hideo Saeki, Chikako Kanda
PROD DES Kazuo Kubo
MUSIC Kyôsuke Kami
SOUND Koichi Sugii

THE GIRL IN THE RUMOR
UWASA NO MUSUME
Japan
1935
54 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Japanese

DIR Mikio Naruse
SCR Mikio Naruse
DP Hiroshi Suzuki
CAST Sachiko Chiba, Ryuko Umezono, Kamatari Fujiwara, Tomoko Ito, Ko Mihashi, Heihachirô Ôkawa, Yo Shiomi
PROD DES Junnosuke Yamazaki
MUSIC Noboru Ito
SOUND Yuji Michinari

TOCHUKEN KUMOEMON
Japan
1936
73 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Japanese

DIR Mikio Naruse
SCR Seika Mayama, Mikio Naruse
DP Hiroshi Suzuki
CAST Ryunosuke Tsukigata, Chikako Hosokawa, Sachiko Chiba, Kamatari Fujiwara, Kaoru Itô, Masao Mishima, Asataro Ichikawa, Yoshio Kosugi, Ko Mihashi, Shin Date, Eitarô Ozawa, Shoji Maruyama, Hisashi Sumikawa
PROD DES Takeo Kita
MUSIC Noboru Ito

A WOMAN’S SORROWS
Japan
1937
74 Min
Black and white
1.37: 1
Japanese

DIR Mikio Naruse

LEARN FROM EXPERIENCE, PART I
KAFUKU ZEMPEN
Japan
1937
78 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Japanese

DIR Mikio Naruse
SCR Kan Kikuchi, Fumitaka Iwasaki
DP Mitsuo Miura
CAST Minoru Takada, Takako Irie, Chieko Takehisa, Sadao Maruyama, Yuriko Hanabusa, Setsuko Horikoshi, Akira Ubukata, Kaoru Itô, Ko Mihashi, Tomoko Ito, Yumeko Aizome, Heihachirô Ôkawa, Chizuko Kanda
PROD DES Takeo Kita
MUSIC Takio Niki

LEARN FROM EXPERIENCE, PART II
KAFUKU KÔHEN
Japan
1937
79 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Japanese

DIR Mikio Naruse
SCR Mikio Naruse, Fumitaka Iwasaki
DP Mitsuo Miura
CAST Minoru Takada, Takako Irie, Chieko Takehisa, Sadao Maruyama, Yuriko Hanabusa, Setsuko Horikoshi, Akira Ubukata, Kaoru Itô, Ko Mihashi, Tomoko Ito, Yumeko Aizome, Heihachirô Ôkawa, Chizuko Kanda
PROD DES Takeo Kita
MUSIC Takio Niki

AVALANCHE
NADARE
Japan
1937
59 Min
Black and White
Japanese

DIR Mikio Naruse
SCR Jiro Osaragi
DP Mikiya Tachibana
CAST Noboru Kiritachi, Ranko Edogawa, Hideo Saeki, Yuriko Hanabusa, Yo Shiomi, Sadao Maruyama
MUSIC Nobuo Iida
SOUND Isamu Suzuki

TSURUHACHI AND TSURUJIRO
TSURUHACHI TSURUJIRO
Japan
1938
88 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Japanese

DIR Mikio Naruse
SCR Mikio Naruse, Matsutaro Kawaguchi
DP Takeo Itô
CAST Kazuo Hasegawa, Isuzu Yamada, Kamatari Fujiwara, Heihachirô Ôkawa, Masao Mishima, Unpei Yokoyama, Kenho Nakamura, Kan Yanagiya, Bompei Yamagata, Nagamasa Yamada
ED Koichi Iwashita
PROD DES Nobuyoshi Morita, Kazuo Kubo
MUSIC Nobuo Iida
SOUND Yuji Dogen

DANCING GIRL OF IZU
IZU NO ODORIKO
Japan
1933
93 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Silent, Japanese

DIR Heinosuke Gosho
SCR Akira Fushimi, Yasunari Kawabata
DP Jôji Ohara
CAST Kinuyo Tanaka, Den Obinata, Shozaburo Abe, Tokuji Kobayashi, Kinuko Wakamizu, Shizue Akiyama, Jun Arai, Kikuko Hanaoka, Chôko Iida, Shiro Katsuragi, Eiko Takamatsu, Ryoichi Takeuchi, Reikichi Kawamura, Ryotaro Mizushima, Kiyoshi Seino
PROD DES Takashi Kanasu, Rynosuke Akita, Noburo Kimura
MUSIC Mikihiko Nagata

OUR NEIGHBOR, MISS YAE
TONARI NO YAE-CHAN
Japan
1934
76 Min
Black and White
Japanese

DIR Yasujiro Shimazu
SCR Yasujiro Shimazu
DP Takashi Kuwabara
CAST Yukichi Iwata, Chôko Iida, Yumeko Aizome, Yoshiko Okada, Ryotaro Mizushima
MUSIC Hiraku Saotome

SADAO YAMANAKA

TANGE SAZEN AND THE POT WORTH A MILLION RYO
TANGE SAZEN YOWA: HYAKUMAN RYO NO TSUBO
Japan
1935
92 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Japanese

DIR Sadao Yamanaka
SCR Shintarô Mimura
DP Jun Yasumoto
CAST Denjirô Ôkôchi, Kiyozo, Kunitaro Sawamura, Reisaburo Yamamoto, Shôji Kiyokawa
New York (Masterworks)

PRIEST OF DARKNESS
KOCHIYAMA SOSHUN
Japan
1936
82 Min
Black and White
Japanese

DIR Sadao Yamanaka
PROD Hassei Uzumasa
SCR Shintarô Mimura, Sadao Yamanaka
DP Harumi Machii
CAST Chojuro Kawarasaki, Kan’emon Nakamura, Shizue Yamagishi, Setsuko Hara
MUSIC Goro Nishi

HUMANITY AND PAPER BALLOONS
NINJO KAMI FUSEN
Japan
1937
86 Min
Black and White
1.37:1
Japanese

DIR Sadao Yamanaka
SCR Shintarô Mimura
DP Akira Mimura
CAST Chojuro Kawarasaki, Kan’emon Nakamura, Tsuruzo Nakamura, Choemon Bando, Sukezo Sukedakaya, Emitaro Ichikawa, Noboru Kiritachi, Shizue Yamagishi, Daisuke Katô
MUSIC Tadashi Ota

Read less