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EXPLORE BRAZILIAN CINEMA

by Zeppo
Brazilian Cinema Brazilian cinema was introduced early in the 20th century but took some time to consolidate itself as a popular form of entertainment. The film industry of Brazil has gone through periods of ups and downs, a reflection of its dependency on State funding and incentives. Cinema Novo The Italian Neorealism followed later in the sixties by the French New Wave (or Nouvelle Vague) fueled a new kind of modernistic and experimental cinema across the globe. In Brazil, this tendency was carried out by its own new wave movement, the Cinema Novo. Glauber Rocha, a very political filmmaker from Bahia, quickly became the most notable… Read more

Brazilian Cinema

Brazilian cinema was introduced early in the 20th century but took some time to consolidate itself as a popular form of entertainment. The film industry of Brazil has gone through periods of ups and downs, a reflection of its dependency on State funding and incentives.

Cinema Novo

The Italian Neorealism followed later in the sixties by the French New Wave (or Nouvelle Vague) fueled a new kind of modernistic and experimental cinema across the globe. In Brazil, this tendency was carried out by its own new wave movement, the Cinema Novo. Glauber Rocha, a very political filmmaker from Bahia, quickly became the most notable director, often held as “leader” of the movement. His work possesses many allegorical elements, strong political critique and an impeccable mise-en-scène that were readily embraced by intellectuals.

Rocha often spoke of his films as being a departure from what he considered to be the colonizer’s view, to whom poverty was an exotic and distant reality, as well as the colonized who regarded their third world status as shameful. He sought to portray misery, hunger and the violence they generate and thus suggest the need for a revolution. Deus e o Diabo na Terra do Sol and Terra em Transe are some of his most famous works.

Other key directors of the movement include Nelson Pereira dos Santos, Ruy Guerra and Carlos Diegues. Freedom to express political views becomes scarce as the 1964 Brazilian coup d’état takes place and repression increases over the following years, forcing many of these artists into exile.

-Wikipedia

1) The Unscrupulous Ones (1962)

2) Foreign Land (1996)

3) Barren Lives (1963)

4) The Angel Was Born (1969)

5) Limite (1931)

6) Black God, White Devil (1964)

7) All the Women in the World (1967)

8) The Deceased (1965)

9) The Given Word (1962)

10) Men and Women (1964)

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