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Films dealing on the faith and arts.

by Doc Block
Films dealing on the faith and arts. by Doc Block
Art (and by this I mean the ‘‘other’’ visual and plastic arts: painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, etc.) has been reflected and represented in, thematized by and structured into narrative films in myriad ways throughout the history of cinema. The potential of cinema lies in the unique ability of the film image to communicate the truth more effectively (or affectively) than language. The image is able to reveal the totality of the universe and allows the viewer to experience simultaneously complex and contradictory feelings. An image is captured only when the director abandons all attempts at objectivity, building instead from his… Read more

Art (and by this I mean the ‘‘other’’ visual and plastic arts: painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, etc.) has been reflected and represented in, thematized by and structured into narrative films in myriad ways throughout the history of cinema. The potential of cinema lies in the unique ability of the film image to communicate the truth more effectively (or affectively) than language. The image is able to reveal the totality of the universe and allows the viewer to experience simultaneously complex and contradictory feelings. An image is captured only when the director abandons all attempts at objectivity, building instead from his own personal storehouse of memory and experience.

“We can express our feelings regarding the world around us either by poetic or by descriptive means. I prefer to express myself metaphorically. Let me stress: metaphorically, not symbolically. A symbol contains within itself a definite meaning, certain intellectual formula, while metaphor is an image. An image possessing the same distinguishing features as the world it represents. An image — as opposed to a symbol — is indefinite in meaning. One cannot speak of the infinite world by applying tools that are definite and finite. We can analyse the formula that constitutes a symbol, while metaphor is a being-within-itself, it’s a monomial. It falls apart at any attempt of touching it.”
― Andrei Tarkovsky

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