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KENJI'S WELSH ART GALLERY- in process of rebuilding

by Kenji
KENJI'S WELSH ART GALLERY- in process of rebuilding by Kenji
I am slowly going to redo this gallery, since (with new Mubi rules) the images are no longer visible and i must provide links to be clicked. Still, I think it will be worth it. start here Until the mid-late 18th century native Welsh artists were quite rare. At that time, Wales became attractive for English artists and visitors, with the romantic appeal of wild and picturesque landscapes, peaking in the Victorian era, though Wales was producing some fine (if often neglected) artists of its own. Most artists represented here were born in Wales, others were residents, and i’ve included some visitors too- for a fuller picture, and since the… Read more

I am slowly going to redo this gallery, since (with new Mubi rules) the images are no longer visible and i must provide links to be clicked. Still, I think it will be worth it.

start here

Until the mid-late 18th century native Welsh artists were quite rare. At that time, Wales became attractive for English artists and visitors, with the romantic appeal of wild and picturesque landscapes, peaking in the Victorian era, though Wales was producing some fine (if often neglected) artists of its own. Most artists represented here were born in Wales, others were residents, and i’ve included some visitors too- for a fuller picture, and since the history of Welsh art involves cross-border movement.

PAINTINGS

St Teilo’s Church Medieval Paintings

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Adriaen Van Cronenburgh: Katheryn of Berain, Mother of Wales

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Anon: Sir Thomas Mansel of Margam and his Wife Jane

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Anon: Philip Proger

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Richard Wilson: View of Snowdon from Nantlle

Richard Wilson: Llyn Peris and Dolbadarn Castle

Richard Wilson: The Destruction of the Children of Niobe

Richard Wilson: Castell Dinas Bran

Richard Wilson: Solitude

Richard Wilson: Llyn-y-Cau, Cader Idris

Richard Wilson: Caernarvon Castle

Born in Mid Wales, Wilson (1714-82) has been called the “father” of British landscape painting, an influence on Turner. An admirer of Claude Lorrain, his landscapes are in the idealised classical style, most often Italian(ate) but also many in Wales. View of Snowdon may be his most famous painting; voted in a nationwide poll (along with Thomas Jones’ Buildings in Naples and Gwen John’s Corner of the Artist’s Room) among the 100 greatest paintings in the UK.
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Paul Sandby: A Welsh Sunset River Landscape

The English artist Paul Sandby’s paintings of Wales in the 1770s helped burgeoning interest in Wales as a place to visit for its natural beauty, wild and romantic qualities.
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Thomas Jones: A View of Certosa di San Martino with the Castle Sant Elmo, Naples

Thomas Jones: Landscape with Dido and Aeneas

Thomas Jones: Buildings in Naples

Thomas Jones: Bay of Naples

Thomas Jones: A Wall in Naples

Thomas Jones: The Bard

A student of Wilson, Thomas Jones (1742-1803) ranged from the classical to the dramatic baroque, to studies of buildings- a delight in observation for its own sake- that are strikingly modern for a late 18th century artist. Buildings in Naples is a tiny painting and A Wall in Naples the smallest in The National Gallery, London. When i saw it exhibited in Cardiff, it had me all choked up. Maybe i was moved that he hailed from my own neck of the woods, the former county of Radnorshire. His Dido and Aeneas painting has been in the Hermitage in St Petersburg since the reign of Catherine the Great. In recent years his reputation has rocketed.

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William Parry: Watkin E. Wynne

William Parry: The Blind Harpist Joseph Parry

Willam Parry was the famous Welsh harpist’s son. He died at the age of 47 and became neglected, many of his paintings lost or mis-attributed, but he is the subject of a recent book by Miles Wynn Cato.

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Anon: The Ladies of Llangollen’s Cats

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John Downman: Portrait of a Man

John Downman: Elizabeth Mortlock and her Son

John Downman: Mrs Siddons

Born in Denbighshire, 1750, Downman was a painter of portraits (often miniatures), theatrical and mythological scenes, who exhibited regularly at the Royal Academy in London. Sarah Siddons the great Welsh stage actress was famously painted by Reynolds and Gainsborough, but here there’s more intimacy.

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Thomas Barker: Twilight on the Dee, North Wales

Thomas Barker: Self Portrait

Thomas Barker: Priscilla Jones, Wife of the Artist

Thomas Barker: River Landscape with Figures

Known as Barker of Bath, Thomas Barker (1769-1847) was born near Pontypool, and became an artist of repute in England. Son of a horse painter, his brothers Benjamin and Joseph and son Thomas Jones Barker were also fine painters.
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Benjamin Barker II: Fishermen by a Stream in a Rocky Landscape

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Daniel Clowes: The White Ox of Nannau
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J M W Turner: Flint Castle, North Wales

The great English artist Turner travelled and painted extensively in Wales, which was important in his early career development.
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Joseph Barker: A Welsh Landscape
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David Cox: Welsh Funeral


David Cox: Rhyl Sands

Accomplished English painter Cox is strongly identified with Wales for his numerous tours and paintings of the country.
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Anon: Nantyglo Ironworks (c 1830)
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John Petherick
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Hugh Hughes: Mrs John Jones of Castle Street, Liverpool


Hugh Hughes: Mrs Janet Davies, Fronheulog, Llandderfel .

Hugh Hughes has been deservedly championed by Welsh art historian Peter Lord, who has done wonders- while struggling against the establishment’s “high art” snobbery- in raising awareness and appreciation of previously neglected Welsh artists.
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Penry Williams: Cyfarthfa Ironworks Interior at night


Penry Williams: Bridge over the River Taff


Penry Williams: A Distant View of St Peter’s, Rome


Penry Williams: Procession to the Christening near Araccia

Penry Williams from Merthyr Tydfil painted South Wales and also idyllic Italian peasant scenes. His surprising neglect has been countered with an exhibition of his work along with Turner’s Welsh paintings.
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Rev. Calvert Jones: The Rialto Bridge, Venice


Rev. Calvert Jones: Sheep Dog

From a wealthy South Wales family, the Reverend Jones (1804-77), a mathematician as well as painter, was educated at Eton and Oxford, and was a pioneer of photography at Margam.
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Joseph Murray Ince: Welsh Lake Fishing


Joseph Murray Ince: Hay-on-Wye and the Brecon Beacons

From Presteigne in Radnorshire, Ince (1806-59) was one of the county’s few artists of note. A pupil of David Cox, he became master of drawing at Cambridge, then returned to Presteigne, dividing his time mainly between there and London.
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William Dyce: Welsh Landscape with Two Ladies Knitting

William Dyce was a well known Scottish artist in the Victorian era and this is one of the most iconic images of Wales.
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William Roos: Thomas Edwards, Twm o’r Nant
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Edward Pritchard: Crossing the Sands to Swansea Market
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James Harris senior: Inner Sound, the Mumbles

Resident of Swansea, Harris (born 1810) specialised in nautical scenes.
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Sidney Richard Percy: Llyn Ddinas

Born in England, the Victorian landscape artist (1821-86) dropped his surname Williams in his work, to be more easily differentiated from other Williamses, including painters in his own family. He had a special affinity for the Welsh highlands.
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Benjamin Williams Leader: Tintern Abbey

With so many Williamses- and related to Sidney Percy- Leader also went by a different surname. He painted mainly in North Wales and his birth county of Worcestershire in England.
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Henry Clarence Whaite: To the Cold Earth

Passionately representing the atmospheric majesty of Snowdonia, Whaite married a Welsh woman, settled in the Conwy valley, with an artists’ colony at Betws-y-Coed, and was instrumental in setting up the Cambrian (i.e Welsh) academy.
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Ebenezer Downard: A Mountain Path at Capel Curig
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Charles Jones: Donkey and Sheep in a Winter Landscape

Charles Jones (1836-1902), born near Cardiff, was affectionately known as “sheep Jones”. Resident for years in London, he specialised in painting animals in British landscapes.
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Anon: Edith Eleanor Aberystwyth

One of many artisan paintings of Welsh ships. Edith Eleanor was the last sailing ship built at Aberystwyth, in 1881.
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Alfred Sisley: The Cliff at Penarth

The famous impressionist Sisley painted several views of the South Wales coast.
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Mansel Lewis: Old Bet Collecting Firewood

Having inherited the family’s Stradey Castle estate, Llanelli, Mansel Lewis became a patron of art as well as painter himself.
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Thomas Prytherch: Cyfarthfa Steelworks at Dusk


Thomas Prytherch: Landscape with a Shepherdess
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Lionel Walden: Cardiff Docks

Walden was a visitor from USA who painted several South Wales scenes
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Edgar Thomas: Foliage, Water and Bird
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Albert de Belleroche: Nana


Albert de Belleroche: Etude

Albert de Belleroche (1864-1944) was born in Swansea, from a line of French Huguenot aristocrats who fled France for Britain in the 17th century.
He moved to Paris in his youth and mixed with Toulouse-Lautrec, the impressionists and John Singer Sargent.
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Frank Brangwyn: Empire Panels: Burma


Frank Brangwyn: Santa Maria della Salute


Frank Brangwyn: Caernarfon Castle


Frank Brangwyn: Swans


Frank Brangwyn

Born in Belgium of Welsh parentage, Brangwyn (1867-1956) was a distinguished and prolific draughtsman, painter, lithographer, woodcutter, mural artist and photographer, not only with “orientalist” and international leanings but an interest in history, ships, machinery and industrial labour. His work went out of fashion with the advent of modernism, but is now on the rebound.
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Valerius de Saedeleer: Winter Landscape near Aberystwyth

Valerius de Saedeleer was a Belgian artist who lived in rural West Wales for a few years during the first world war.
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Christopher Williams: Mrs Parry Jones


Christopher Williams: Tangiers


Christopher Williams: The Red Dress


Christopher Williams: The Welsh at Mametz Wood


Christopher Williams: Sunset from Barmouth


Christopher Williams: Deffroad Cymru/ The Awakening of Wales

Christopher Williams was much admired for his landscapes, portraits and paintings of biblical, historical and mythological subjects. Long neglected, his reputation is likely to rise, following a major retrospective in summer 2012. I find the Welsh at Mametz Wood painting quite harrowing- i hope the horror of war outweighs any patriotic sentiment. Christopher Williams’ son Ivor was a fine painter, and his grand-daughter Annie won the 2009 Turner watercolour prize.
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Isaac Williams: Still Life
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Gwen John: The Precious Book


Gwen John: Mere Poussepin


Gwen John: Interior


Gwen John: Self Portrait


Gwen John: Young Woman Holding a Black Cat


Gwen John: A Corner of the Artist’s Room, Open Window

Gwen John’s reputation now exceeds that of her once more famous younger brother Augustus, as he himself predicted. The delicacy of her paintings belies a strong-willed passionate nature and attachments. In Paris she got to know Matisse, Picasso, Brancusi and Rilke among others. Having been the model, lover and for years the devotee of the sculptor Rodin, she lived a simple life at the Parisian suburb Meudon, painting quiet studies of girls, cats and (having become a devout Catholic) the nuns of the nearby convent. Although her range was limited, her work has a rare Vermeerian quality of stillness and reflection, along with subtle colour tones, that i find very rewarding.
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William Grant Murray: The Old Mumbles Train

William Grant Murray was a Scot who was head of the School of Art in Swansea. Swansea-Mumbles was the world’s first passenger railway.
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Francis Dodd: An Operation at the Military Hospital, Endell Street


Francis Dodd: In the Park

Born and raised in Wales, Dodd studied art at Glasgow and became an established painter in England, and official war artist.
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Laura Knight: Ruby Loftus Screwing a Breech Ring

Ruby Loftus was an “outstanding” worker in World War II at the Royal Ordnance factory at Newport, where Dame Laura Knight, the famous English official war artist, spent four weeks. The painting was voted best of 1943 by the British public.
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Augustus John: Dorelia at Alderney Manor


Augustus John: Guilhermina Suggia


Augustus John: Head of a Jamaican Girl


Augustus John: Dylan Thomas


Augustus John: Sphinx


Augustus John: Llyn Tryweryn

Augustus John was famous not only as a portrait painter and superb draughtsman but also for a bohemian lifestyle (he travelled with romanies in a horse-drawn caravan), with ménage a trois, numerous affairs and offspring, including Gwyneth Johnstone, who also became an artist. His portraits have a loose deft touch and I especially like his Llyn Tryweryn painting, capturing a great sense of freedom in the Welsh landscape.
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Martin Bloch: Slate Heaps in North Wales
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James Dickson Innes: Arenig


James Dickson Innes: Canigou in Snow


James Dickson Innes: The Seine at Caudebec, France


James Dickson Innes: Landscape with Figure, Arenig

Born in Llanelli, South Wales, Innes painted together with Augustus John in the region round Arenig in the North, and then travelled to the South of France, Spain (his mother was of Catalan parentage) and Morocco, but died of Tuberculosis aged 27 in 1914. Arenig was his Mont St Victoire, his death an important loss to Welsh and British art.
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Thomas E Stephens: President Eisenhower

Thomas E Stephens from Cardiff had a distinguished career as a portrait painter in USA
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Will Evans: Snow in Swansea
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L S Lowry: Six Bells, Abertillery

Famed for his paintings of city life in Northern England, Lowry painted scenes in Wales late in his career.
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Nina Hamnett: Dolores Courtney


Nina Hamnett: Lady Constance Stewart Richardson

Nina Hamnett (born 1890) was famous as the “Queen of Bohemia” for her flamboyant, unconventional and openly bisexual lifestyle in both London and Paris. Model for Modigliani and Picasso, expert on sea chanteys, she sank into alcoholism and squalor
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Margaret Williams


Margaret Williams
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Stanley Spencer

Spencer, one of the major English artists of the 20th century, was a visitor rather than resident- but his art always welcome!
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Donald Henry Floyd: Newport Bridge During Construction
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Evan Walters: The Blind Pianist


Evan Walters: A Woman Reading


Evan Walters: A Welsh Miner


Evan Walters: Woman in an Arch of Trees


Evan Walters: Self Portrait with Candle


Evan Walters: The Communist


Evan Walters: Blackened Face with Reclining Nude

One of Welsh art’s hidden treasures, Walters’ rising career between the wars declined in the 30s when he developed his own “double vision” style and then experimented with more abstract work. A recent TV programme and an excellent book, Evan Walters: Moments of Vision, have raised his profile. More Walters paintings on the forum Off Topic section thread.
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Cedric Morris: Iris Seedlings


Cedric Morris: Stoke-by-Neyland Church


Cedric Morris: Caeharris Post Office


Cedric Morris: Two Sisters


Cedric Morris: Loughor from Penclawdd


Cedric Morris: Belle of Bloomsbury

Born in Swansea, and son of a Welsh Rugby international, Sir Cedric Morris was an important horticulturalist as well as respected art teacher who founded an art school in East Anglia. Lucian Freud was one of his pupils. He hated cruelty to animals and in England had a running feud with a local gamekeeper who shot cats and dogs – until he tripped over his gun and shot himself
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David Jones: The Four Queens Find Launcelot Sleeping


David Jones: The Lee Shore


David Jones: Hill Pasture, Capel-y-Ffin


David Jones: Tristan and Isolde

David Jones may be best known as a poet (e.g In Parenthesis) but was also an original watercolourist, illustrator and print-maker. Based for years, along with sculptor Eric Gill, at Capel-y-Ffin, he was drawn to mythological, spiritual and Welsh subjects.
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Joseph Hennah
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Vincent Evans: After the Blast


Vincent Evans: Family Life

Vincent Evans was born in 1895 in South Wales. One of a family of eight children, he started working as a miner at the age of 13, but won a scholarship to Swansea School of Art then attended the Royal College of Art in London. From 1923 he taught art in New Zealand, returning to Wales in 1932, painting portraits as well as mining scenes.
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Leonard Foote: River Usk, Newport Transporter Bridge
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George Charlton: Welsh Chapel
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George Phillis: Barrage Balloon, Newport
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Edward Morland Lewis: Working Man’s Room


Edward Morland Lewis: The Strand, Laugharne

Born at Carmarthen in 1902, Lewis was a student of Walter Sickert in London, and in turn taught at the Chelsea College of Art. He died in 1943 in North Africa, serving as a camouflage officer.
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Graham Sutherland: Trees with G Shaped Form


Graham Sutherland

Well-known English artist Graham Sutherland found himself inspired by what he called “the exultant strangeness” of Wales, in particular Pembrokeshire, with which he is strongly associated.
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John Piper: Welsh Landscape

English artist John Piper became very attached to Wales after marrying Myfanwy Evans; they lived in both Snowdonia and Pembrokeshire.
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Sam Morse-Brown: Viaduct and the Green, Tenby
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Ceri Richards: Girl on a Divan


Ceri Richards: Cycle of Nature


Ceri Richards: Tulips

Born Swansea 1903, Richards was a prize-winner at the 1962 Venice Biennale. His work reflects his interest in music and poetry, as well as the influence of major groundbreaking artists like Picasso and Matisse.
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Ray Howard-Jones: Under Milk Wood, Homage to Dylan


Ray Howard-Jones: Moment of Perception

Rosemary (known as “Ray”) Howard-Jones (1903-96) grew up near Cardiff and on a visit to Pembrokeshire as a child fell in love with the coastline that was to pull and sustain her throughout her life. After being an official war artist and moving to London, she continued to spend long periods on the uninhabited island of Skomer with its puffins and seals- for years with her long-term partner, photographer Ray Moore, then as a rather eccentric recluse.
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Evan Charlton: the Artist’s Family at Llandaff
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Rex Whistler: Plas Newydd Mural (part)


Rex Whistler: Lady Caroline Paget

English-born Whistler (1905-44) painted a large mural at Plas Newydd on Anglesey, where he fell for the Marquess of Anglesey’s daughter Lady Caroline Paget. He died fighting in the Welsh Guards in World War 2 in Normandy.
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Stanley Lewis: The Welsh Molecatcher


Stanley Lewis: Hyde Park in Summer (detail)
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Nicholas Evans: Entombed- Jesus in the Midst


Nicholas Evans: My Mother was a Pit Pony

Nicholas Evans (born 1907) was a self-taught working class artist who had a unique vision blending spirituality with the dark, claustrophobic world of mining. Following his father’s death in a mining accident, at his mother’s wish he gave up the pits himself and became a rail engine driver.
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Will Roberts: The Reading Room
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Ivor Williams: Woman in a Red Necktie
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Merlyn Evans
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Alfred Janes: Hyacinths


Alfred Janes: Salome


Alfred Janes: Still Life: Benedictine Bottle

Alfred Janes was a member of the “Kardomah gang” of poets, musicians and artists, including Dylan Thomas, who frequented Swansea’s Kardomah café in the 1930s.
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Josef Herman: Three Miners

Josef Herman (1911-2000) was a Polish immigrant best known for his work at Ystradgynlais in South Wales. His art brings a dark primitive grandeur to mining.
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Brenda Chamberlain: Composition with Three Figures


Brenda Chamberlain


Brenda Chamberlain: Girl with a Siamese Cat


Brenda Chamberlain: Self Portrait

Born Bangor 1912, Brenda Chamberlain was a writer and poet as well as painter, and started Caseg Press with her husband, fellow artist John Petts. She lived for 14 years on Bardsey Island off the coast of North West Wales, before going to live on the Greek island Hydra in 1963. Following her return to Wales, she suffered a breakdown and died in 1971 from an overdose of sleeping pills.
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Thomas Rathmell: The Red Room


Thomas Rathmell: Newport from Christchurch Road


Thomas Rathmell: Sisters
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Eric Malthouse: A Flurry of Pigeons

Born Birmingham, England in 1914, Eric Malthouse was a founder member of the “South Wales Group”, and also the “56 Group” promoting modernist artists
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John Bowen


John Bowen: Mediterranean Fishing Boat


John Bowen: Still Life with Fruit and Peppers
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Charles Byrd: Sand Hopper, East Dock

Self-taught Charles Byrd from Pontypridd provided distinctive and popular views of Cardiff and its surroundings.
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John Elwyn: Bishop’s Palace, St David’s


John Elwyn: Bore Sul (Sunday Morning)
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Kyffin Williams: Farmer, Pont Llyfni


Kyffin Williams: Storm, Trearddur


Kyffin Williams: Crib Coch and Llanberis Pass


Kyffin Williams: Sunset, Penmon


Kyffin Williams

Sir Kyffin Williams (1918-2006) was the grand old man of Welsh painting, as his contemporary R S Thomas was to poetry, and both adopted a pared down style. His paintings are often bleak and wintry. He rejected fads and fashions, followed his own path, and his reputation continues to rise.
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Heinz Koppel: Lovers Lane


Heinz Koppel: Mare and Foal

Heinz Koppel (born 1919) was a Jewish refugee, with his father, from Nazi Germany, who spent most of his adult life in Wales. His mother died in a concentration camp. His son Gideon directed the film Sleep Furiously about the West Wales valley where they lived.
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Robert Hunter: Banner for Pwyll and Rhiannon
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Hywel Harries: The Tugboat


Hywel Harries: South Marine Terrace, Aberystwyth
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Bert Isaac: Mining Area
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David Tinker: Dune Weather

Mixing sculptures, figurative paintings, geometric and then looser abstracts, David Tinker was an influential teacher who co-founded the innovative 56 Group and continued to promote modern and experimental art in Wales.
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Gordon Stuart: Port Talbot Steelworks
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Glenys Cour
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Colin Allen: A Canalside Scene in an Industrial Town
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Glyn Morgan: Cedric Morris in his Garden
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Ernest Zobole: Painting Influenced by Landscape of the Locality


Ernest Zobole: Painting of an Interior, No.2

The son of Italian immigrants to South Wales, Ernest Zobole (1927-1999) was an art teacher and visionary member of the Rhondda group.
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Colin Jones: Self Portrait


Colin Jones: Miners Resting


Colin Jones: The Dancing Dress

Colin Jones was a Francophile convert to Catholicism, concerned with working class communities, who died in an accident aged 38.
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Evelyn Williams


Evelyn Williams

Sadness, anguish, compassion. 1929- 2012, Evelyn (1929-2012) has been subject of a TV film, featuring Helen Mirren. Little surprise that she was an admirer of William Blake. An evacuee from England to Blaenau Ffestiniog (reinforcing her sense of Welshness) in World War 2, she later worked into old age at her home and studio in London. The Bridgeman gallery staff are gathering 1400 works from her career to put online.
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Gwilym Prichard
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Jeffrey Steele: Syntagma, Sg IV, 75


Jeffrey Steele: Rational Concepts

Born Cardiff, 1931, Jeffrey Steele was one of the leading British exponents of Constructivism and Op Art, and co-founder of the Systems Group. Along with Bridget Riley he made a splash in New York in the 60s.
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Handel Evans


Handel Evans
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Gordon House: Amsterdam A


Gordon House: Dial Set 4

Gordon House came to prominence as an artist and designer in the 60s, and worked for the Rolling Stones and Beatles
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Thomas John Nash: Into Blue
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William Selwyn: Lobster
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Liam Hanley
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Claudia Williams: Mother and Child


Claudia Williams: And There’s Your Great Grandfather

Claudia Williams’ paintings, centred on women and children in everyday life and on beaches (while occasionally branching into religious or political themes) combine warmth, integrity and harmony. They are lifted by a mastery of colour, form and decorative patterns. Often on the move, she and her artist husband Gwilym Prichard spent time at Skiathos in Greece, and lived in Brittany for 10 years, before returning to Wales, to her beloved seaside, at Tenby.
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John Knapp-Fisher
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Mary Lloyd Jones
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Robert Alwyn Hughes
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Valerie Ganz
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Ivor Davies: The Childhood of Maponos

Ivor Davies is an activist and Welsh art historian who has ranged from assured landscapes, through performance art and destruction involving explosives, to paintings of Welsh mythological and historical figures.
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John Uzzell Edwards: Welsh Wedding


John Uzzell Edwards: Houses, Merthyr
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Terry Setch: Once upon a Time there was Oil


Terry Setch: Midnight Columns II
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John Selway: Hunchback in the Park
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Jack Crabtree: Preparation for Below
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William Wilkins: A Spring Afternoon
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David Griffiths: Sian Phillips
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Andrew Vicari: Port Talbot

Andrew Vicari has been best known for his highly paid work as Saudi official royal artist
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David Woodford: The Kestrel
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Mihangel Jones: Yellow Legs
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Tony Goble
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Harry Holland

Glasgow-born Harry Holland has been a popular figurative painter since moving to Cardiff in 1973.
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John Baum: Afternoon at Windermere House

Born in Anglesey in 1942, John Baum taught art at Liverpool
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Harry Robertson
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John Beard: Janet Laurence


John Beard: Sphinx

John Beard has made a name for himself internationally, with a range of work, and from bases in Portugal and Australia.
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Mali Morris: Almost


Mali Morris
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Peter Prendergast: Orange Sunset


Peter Prendergast: Early Winter, Nant Ffrancon Valley
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Keith Andrew


Keith Andrew: First Snow
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Ieuan Williams: Sea Alarm, Cardiff Docks
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Kevin Sinnott: Bit of a Wind Getting up


Kevin Sinnott: Out of the Past.


Kevin Sinnott: Don’t Ever Leave me Baby


Kevin Sinnott: Running Away with the Hairdresser

Running away with the Hairdresser has been a popular large painting in the National Gallery of Wales, Cardiff. Kevin brings affection, uplifting colour, movement and vitality to the South Wales valleys where he was born and returned to live in the 1990s..
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Sonja Benskin Mesher: Noose of Light
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Gilly Thomas: Three Significant Signs of Hope
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Malcolm Edwards: Golygfan
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Cherry Pickles: Self Portrait as the Last Bard (Solva)
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Rob Piercy: Traeth Portmeirion


Rob Piercy: Clouds over Snowdon
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Clive Hicks-Jenkins: Turn of the Tide


Clive Hicks-Jenkins: Virgin of the Goldfinches


Clive Hicks-Jenkins

Clive Hicks-Jenkins was born in Newport, Monmouthshire in 1951 and currently lives in mid Wales. He came late to painting after a career in theatre. I’m taken with his beautiful and mysterious mix of dreams and mythology, and he seems a gentle soul.
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Jenny Jones: Self Portrait
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Ceri Auckland Davies
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Edward Povey: The Landing
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Gareth Parry: Looking Towards Criccieth
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Shani Rhys James


Shani Rhys James


Shani Rhys James: The Boards

Shani was born in Australia in 1953, but of Welsh parentage and long resident in Mid Wales. Her style is instantly recognisable: she delves unflatteringly into her own psyche and draws on her childhood memories. .
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Martyn Jones: Esto Perpetua
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David Tress: In the Window
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Mary Griffiths


Mary Griffiths: Angela and Emma

Mary Griffiths made several paintings of Angela, with Pick’s disease, a degenerative brain disorder, and her daughter Emma.
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David Grosvenor
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Peter Edwards: Ruth Lambert

I was looking at this portrait at the MOMA gallery, Machynlleth, when who should I meet, but…Ruth Lambert!
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Iwan Bala


Iwan Bala: Omphalos/Zimbabwe


Iwan Bala: Mapa Mundi Carta Fragmentada

Iwan Bala’s paintings are often part of (politically committed) multi-media installations. He questions and re-imagines Wales’ history and place in the world, but has also been artist in residence at the National gallery of Zimbabwe.
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Sue Williams

Senior lecturer in Fine Art, Cornish-born Sue Williams was the only Briton shortlisted for the international Artes Mundi prize in 2006. Often painting directly in large scale onto walls, she challenges the treatment of girls and women as sexual commodities.
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Julie Roberts: Workhouse, Boys Ward


Julie Roberts: Digs (Homeless Family after Don McCullin)
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Emrys Williams: To the Lighthouse


Emrys Williams
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Jackie Morris


Jackie Morris

English-born Jackie Morris is a book illustrator and artist who lives at St David’s in Pembrokeshire.
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David Burton Richardson: Twisted Trees, Efailwen

David Burton Richardson has had longstanding mental health problems, often affecting his ability to work. It remains to be seen if his latest exhibition is indeed his last.
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Jen Delyth: Celtic Tree of Life


Jen Delyth

Jen Delyth is an illustrator, author and textile designer specialising in Celtic creations.
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Gareth Hugh Davies: Nocturne
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Carl Melegari


Carl Melegari


Carl Melegari
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David Williams: Pontypridd in 1840
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Brendan Stuart Burns: Green-Grey
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Sarah Carvell: Harbour View
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Neale Howells: Hugh Hefner Eats Meat
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Emyr Williams: Tondo Pinks
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Sarah Ball


Sarah Ball
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Catrin Williams
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Catrin Webster


Catrin Webster: Stackpole Quay

My wife amazed me by recognising the place from the Stackpole Quay picture- well, it is one of our favourite spots with water lily lakes by the sea.
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Ian Phillips

Ian Phillips is a linocut print artist
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Elfyn Lewis
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Iwan Gwyn Parry
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Clare Woods: Hill of Hurdles

Clare Woods lives by the Wales-England border: this painting now at the National Museum of Wales was inspired by a location in Powys.
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Skokholm Toilet Art

For years, visitors to the small Pembrokeshire island of Skokholm have been painting birds on the toilet walls. Here is a link to the pictures (kindly provided by Jiri Nvk)
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Richard J Oliver: Ed’s Dad
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Dan Llywelyn Hall: Tenby Harbour
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Jacob Buckland: Afon Llechach, Late Summer
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Jamie Routley: Catriona
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Seren Jones
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Meirion Ginsberg: Grump
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Hannah Lewis Davies

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OTHER ART


Gower Cave Reindeer, c 12,500BC

The oldest rock art in Britain.
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Gold Mold Cape, 1900-1600 BC
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Caergwrle Bowl

This Bronze age bowl depicting a ship was discovered in a Flintshire bog in the 19th century
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Capel Garmon Firedog (ancient Celtic, c100 BC)
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Carew Cross (1033-1035 AD)
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Tree of Jesse, St Mary’s Church, Abergavenny (15th century)
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Sir John Gibson: Hylas Surprised by the Naiades (1827-36)

Born Conwy, North Wales, Gibson was Queen Victoria’s favourite sculptor.
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Edith Downing: Avarice
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Goscombe John: The Elf


Goscombe John: Age


Goscombe John: The Glamour of the Rose
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Ivor Roberts-Jones: Two Kings (Harlech)


Ivor Roberts-Jones: Winston Churchill (Parliament Square, London)
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John Meirion Morris: Tryweryn Monument.

The village of Tryweryn was drowned, against fierce opposition, for a reservoir to provide more water for Liverpool.
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Barry Flanagan: Hare (Chatsworth House)


Barry Flanagan: Thinker on a Rock (Washington D.C)
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Richard Deacon: Between the Eyes (Toronto)
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Peter Nicholas: Guto Nyth Brân
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Mac Adams

Mac Adams, born in South Wales in 1943. is well known in the USA and elsewhere for his installations and sculptures that create shadows or shapes and vistas when seen from certain angles.
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David Nash: Ash Dome
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Richard Long: Snowdonia Stones
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Heather and Ivan Morrison
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Laura Ford

Laura Ford was born in 1961 to a fairground family. An internationally popular artist, she has created a range of humans, animals and strange creatures, that can be touching or troubling while serving as social comment
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Meri Wells
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Robert Thomas: Miner and his Family, Rhondda
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Guardian of the Valley, Six Bells
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James Williams: Patchwork Coverlet (c 1842)

Welsh folk art remains undervalued; quilts, rugs and lovespoons have been a speciality. Williams’ work above was made from thousands of pieces of cloth.
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Bethan Ash

Bethan Ash is a textile and quilt artist with an international reputation
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Other Welsh artists (including conceptual/installation artists whose work is not done justice by still images):
John Cale, Lowri Davies, Ken Elias, Carwyn Evans, Peter Finnemore, David Garner, Arthur Giardelli, Bari Goddard, Peter Greenaway, Archie Griffiths, Mags Harries, Bethan Huws, Jonah Jones, Tracey Moberly, Gavin Nolan, Lois Williams, Nathan Wyburn

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