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OCCUPY YOUTH CINEMA/FILM/DV OCCUPY NARRATIVE: I must pay my respects to literary writing by disengaging with it and becoming attuned to the new writing of revolution and occupation. Wars are spinning and machines are fighting in our stead. I cannot go on writing about characters as though they will exonerate my sins. Lydia Davis said somewhere that she is no longer interested in writing about relationships between characters within a plot-based narrative. I cannot say that I was ever able to construct a plot-based narrative; only that when I was younger it was easier to think of the end. Now, I only want the tide of life. Even now, I write… Read more

OCCUPY YOUTH CINEMA/FILM/DV

OCCUPY NARRATIVE:
I must pay my respects to literary writing by disengaging with it and becoming attuned to the new writing of revolution and occupation. Wars are spinning and machines are fighting in our stead. I cannot go on writing about characters as though they will exonerate my sins. Lydia Davis said somewhere that she is no longer interested in writing about relationships between characters within a plot-based narrative. I cannot say that I was ever able to construct a plot-based narrative; only that when I was younger it was easier to think of the end. Now, I only want the tide of life. Even now, I write with poetry, but it is true to my life. I do not care to create miniature utopias through imperfect characters who find their way or lose their paths, but always end up home. I am aware of many sensations and emotions that cannot be encapsulated by a character confined to rote notions of experience, identity and existence.
What do I do?

a list in the works that might not work out.

i was thinking about this topic after reading some of the articles in the new youth issue of the new inquiry.

explanations:

1. “L’heure d’été”: The final scene of the girl and her boyfriend running off into the pastoral mass behind the gutted and teenager-occupied house.

2. “Film socialisme”: The young girl in the second movement is a rally cry against the Young-Girl. I think the little boy is a nostalgic character possibly meant as a placeholder for Godard’s own absence in shooting some of the film. Nostalgic because the boy is of the past and seems to like the same things that have influenced Godard.

3. “Simón del desierto”: The time traveling to the 20th Century at the end should not belong in one of the oldest narratives in the world, but Buñuel is a radical.

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