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pathological complexes

by Zoe Wanda Margot
Complex /ˈkɒm.plɛks/ From French complexe, from Latin complexus, past participle of complecti (“to entwine, encircle, compass, infold”), from com- (“together”) and plectere (“to weave, braid”). A complex is a core pattern of emotions, memories, perceptions, and wishes in the personal unconscious organized around a common theme, such as power or status. Primarily a psychoanalytic term, it is found extensively in the works of Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud. An example of a complex would be as follows: if you had a leg amputated when you were a child, this would influence your life in profound ways, even if you were wonderfully successful in… Read more

Complex
/ˈkɒm.plɛks/
From French complexe, from Latin complexus, past participle of complecti (“to entwine, encircle, compass, infold”), from com- (“together”) and plectere (“to weave, braid”). A complex is a core pattern of emotions, memories, perceptions, and wishes in the personal unconscious organized around a common theme, such as power or status. Primarily a psychoanalytic term, it is found extensively in the works of Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud. An example of a complex would be as follows: if you had a leg amputated when you were a child, this would influence your life in profound ways, even if you were wonderfully successful in overcoming the handicap. You might have many thoughts, emotions, memories, feelings of inferiority, triumphs, bitterness, determination… centering on that one aspect of your life. If these thoughts troubled you, Jung would say you had a complex about the leg (Dewey, 2007). Complex existence is widely agreed upon in the area of depth psychology. It assumes the most important factors influencing your personality are deep in the unconscious. They are generally a way of mapping the psyche, and are crucial theoretical items of common reference to be found in therapy. Complexes are believed by Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud to influence the individual’s attitude and behavior.

Psychopathology

From psycho: From Ancient Greek ψυχή (psychē, “soul”) and‎ pathology: From Ancient Greek πάθος (pathos, “suffering”) and -λογία (-logia, “study of”). Psychopathology is the study of mental illness, mental distress and abnormal, maladaptive behavior. The term is most commonly used within psychiatry where pathology refers to disease processes. Abnormal psychology is a similar term used more frequently in the non-medical field of psychology.



Lewis Carroll & Alice Liddell

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