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Poetry Appreciation

by Kim Packard
Created January 2013 Poetry Foundation- Poetry in Motion Woodberry Poetry Room – The Listening Booth# I discovered a new American poet, Hailey Leithauser, through her poems “Was you ever bit by a dead bee?” and “O, She Says” marked by palindromes (bad dab, o gnat tango!) In the first poem, “a muscular sensuality of language” and “grittiness of repetition” comes through with “a pure exuberance” in the traditional triolet form of French poetry as Curtis Fox and Jeffrey Shotts aptly point out. In the second poem, Leithauser makes fun of the ode while stringing together words in an original way that is interesting and amusing. You can listen… Read more

Created January 2013

Poetry Foundation- Poetry in Motion

Woodberry Poetry Room – The Listening Booth#

I discovered a new American poet, Hailey Leithauser, through her poems “Was you ever bit by a dead bee?” and “O, She Says” marked by palindromes (bad dab, o gnat tango!)

In the first poem, “a muscular sensuality of language” and “grittiness of repetition” comes through with “a pure exuberance” in the traditional triolet form of French poetry as Curtis Fox and Jeffrey Shotts aptly point out.

In the second poem, Leithauser makes fun of the ode while stringing together words in an original way that is interesting and amusing.

You can listen to both poems here ( from 5/17/2012 Poetry Off the Shelf)

Poetry Podcasts from the New Yorker

An interview with Graywolf Press editor Jeff Shotts incorporating helpful suggestions for publishing poetry

Poetry analysis Wikipedia article

Poetry close reading Purdue OWL (also image in poetry)

How to Read a Poem by Edward Hirsch

History of Metaphor Melvyn Bragg BBC Radio 4

Poetry as a Way of Knowing Philosophy Talk

Helen Vendler’s lecture on Yeats

East Village Poetry Walk with Jim Jarmusch Don’t go to New York without having explored the East Village poetry walk map at this web site!

Watch a poetry movie

Poetry in Movies

30 Ways to Celebrate Poetry

How to Pick Up a Poetry Habit Poetry Foundation podcast

How to Raise a Poetry Imp Poetry Foundation podcast

A Code with No Message Poetry Foundation podcast

Actors vs. Poets Poetry Foundation podcast

The Issue at Hand Poetry Foundation podcast

Juliet Patterson — How Poets See the World: The Art of Description The Writing University lecture podcast

Philosophy and the Poetic Imagination
Ernie Lepore is a professor of philosophy and co-director of the Center for Cognitive Science at Rutgers University. Matthew Stone is an associate professor in the department of computer science and Center for Cognitive Science at Rutgers. “Poetry is a form in which this reader engagement is particularly striking and important. It’s a good illustration of the way philosophical work can help awaken us to the richness of the language that surrounds us, even in the seeming cacophony of the digital age.”

From The Philosopher, Volume LXXXIX No.2, Philosophical Poems as Caricature of Thought by Chengde Chen

The Poetry and Philosophy of Troubled Times

Poetry Column from The Guardian

MIT Open Courseware – Reading Poetry ""Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion, occasional lecture."

List of free on-line poetry courses

Open Culture on-line course Restoration and 18th Century Poetry: From Dryden to Wordsworth


Added in May 2017

Modern and Contemporary American Poetry University of Pennsylvania Coursera online course ModPo is a fast-paced introduction to modern and contemporary U.S. poetry, with an emphasis on experimental verse, from Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman to the present. Participants (who need no prior experience with poetry) will learn how to read poems that are supposedly “difficult.”

The Art of Poetry with Robert Pinsky An online course led by the former poet laureate

Sharpened Visions: A Poetry Workshop taught by Douglas Kearney, Faculty, MFA in Writing Program, created by California Institute of the Arts -starts June 19

Modern American Poetry University of Illinois’s 4-week Coursera course (The first of the four modules features Hart Crane’s obscure poem The Bridge…the very last module features close readings of Emily Dickinson’s “We Learned the Whole of Love,” Wallace Stevens’s “Large Red Man Reading” and Harryette Mullen’s “Sleeping with the Dictionary” -starts June 5, Jul 3, Jul 31, Aug 28

Modern American Poetry Resource Website: MAPS

English 310: Modern Poetry Yale Open Course Lecture 13&14- Hart Crane, Lecture 16- William Carlos Williams, Lecture 19&20- Wallace Stevens

Langdon Hammer: American Perspectives Langdon Hammer discusses how the life and poetry of Hart Crane served as inspiration for artist Jasper Johns.

Hart Crane: His Poetry in Presence and Meaning by Adriano Moraes Migliavacca (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul)

A Study of the Influence Affecting Hart Crane by Dorothy Jayne McNulty (Loyola University Chicago)

Study of Hart Crane’s Symbolism in White Buildings and The Bridge by Virginia Elizabeth Perkins (The University of Montana)

Hart Crane- Voyages Poem Guide and Writing Exercises

Spark Notes on Poetry

Twenty-One Poems for AP Literature and Composition

TP-CASTT Poetry Analysis

Poetry Essay Prompts for AP Literature 1970- 2017

Introduction to Poetry Writing Syllabus

Lowelll as Teacher Poetry Off the Shelf podcast

Robert Lowell, the Art of Poetry No.3 Interviewer: I know that Hart Crane rewrote early scraps a great deal and used most of the rewrites. But doesn’t doing this imply a theory of poetry that would talk much more about craft than about experience? Lowell: I don’t know, it’s such a miracle if you get lines that are halfway right; it’s not just a technical problem. The lines must mean a good deal to you. All your poems are in a sense one poem, and there’s always the struggle of getting something that balances and comes out right, in which all parts are good, and that has experience that you value. And so if you have a few lines that shine in a poem or are beginning to shine, and they fail and get covered over and drowned, maybe their real form is in another poem. Maybe you’ve mistaken the real inspiration in the original poem and they belong in something else entirely. I don’t think that violates experience. […] I think we always bring over some unexplained obscurities by shifting lines. Something that was clear in the original just seems odd and unexplained in the final poem. That can be quite bad, of course; but you always want—and I think Chekhov talks about this—the detail that you can’t explain. It’s just there. It seems right to you, but you don’t have to have it; you could have something else entirely. Now if everything’s like that you’d just have chaos, but a few unexplained difficult things—they seem to be the life-blood of variety—they may work. What may have seemed a little odd, a little difficult in the original poem, gets a little more difficult in a new way in the new poem. And that’s purely accidental, yet you may gain more than you lose—a new suggestiveness and magic.

Use This Word in a Sentence: Experimental Essay on poetic theory by Ann Lauterbach

The Music of Poetry# by James Longenbach

Ten Poems I Love to Teach

African American Poetry

Native American Poetry and Culture

Core Learning Poems

Schools and Periods

Poetry Daily

troubadours as the models for modern poets
Pos de chantar by troubador William IX Duke of Aquitaine

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