For a better experience on MUBI, update your browser.
My attempt to create my own canon of Polish cinema, containing everything from worth a look to absolute masterpieces. Film’s absence on the list means: a) I haven’t seen it; b) I don’t consider it at least worth a look; c) I don’t consider it Polish enough (films made abroad by Polish directors, like Roman Polański, don’t count). In chronological order, except for first three films: - “The Hourglass Sanatorium” (Wojciech Jerzy Has; 1973) which is in my opinion the greatest film ever made in Poland - “Ashes and Diamonds” (Andrzej Wajda; 1958) which is probably the most internationally recognized Polish film ever - “Ida” (Paweł Pawlikowski;… Read more

My attempt to create my own canon of Polish cinema, containing everything from worth a look to absolute masterpieces.

Film’s absence on the list means:
a) I haven’t seen it;
b) I don’t consider it at least worth a look;
c) I don’t consider it Polish enough (films made abroad by Polish directors, like Roman Polański, don’t count).

In chronological order, except for first three films:
- “The Hourglass Sanatorium” (Wojciech Jerzy Has; 1973) which is in my opinion the greatest film ever made in Poland
- “Ashes and Diamonds” (Andrzej Wajda; 1958) which is probably the most internationally recognized Polish film ever
- “Ida” (Paweł Pawlikowski; 2013) which is probably the most internationally recognized film made in Poland after 1989

Read less