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Priestess of love and death, she veils her face

by ZYNAB
Priestess of love and death, she veils her face by ZYNAB
A chronology of Italian silent diva films! The list’s title comes from a title card in Rapsodia Satanica (1915). “Women suffer from the problem of either not having enough time or having too much of it. Temporality for them is suffused with feelings of anxiety about aging too rapidly or with waiting alone for a real love that may never come. Women’s condition is modern in the sense that “being modern” means to worry about time. Yet their situation is eccentric because whether they experience time as accelerated or slow, they are emotionally out of synch with the comparatively more controllable time of clocks and calendars that pace men’s… Read more

A chronology of Italian silent diva films! The list’s title comes from a title card in Rapsodia Satanica (1915).

“Women suffer from the problem of either not having enough time or having too much of it. Temporality for them is suffused with feelings of anxiety about aging too rapidly or with waiting alone for a real love that may never come. Women’s condition is modern in the sense that “being modern” means to worry about time. Yet their situation is eccentric because whether they experience time as accelerated or slow, they are emotionally out of synch with the comparatively more controllable time of clocks and calendars that pace men’s careers and industrial production. In early cinema, a human figure moving too fast or moving slow may have looked funny or surreal because these two rhythms were at odds with a more consistent linear motion in space over time. Likewise, hysteric convulsions and shifting fabrics are two hypnotic features deeply associated with the image of the film diva. As a result of the diva’s emphasis on motion as curvature, it is impossible not to think of a special kind of feminine temporality—one that proceeds by leaps and bounds, in contrast to the relatively straight, causal trajectory of a more predictable and productive patriarchal teleology.”

Diva: Defiance and Passion in Early Italian Cinema, Angela Dalle Vacche

titles not in the database (and I’m sure there’s a lot more to discover):

Diana, the Seductress (1915)
Madame Tallien (1916)
Carnevalesca (1918)
La Passaggera (1918) – survives in fragments
Caino (1918)
La storia di una donna (1920)

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