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The movies enjoyed by Ingmar Bergman, in his private cinema on the island of Fårö.

by Franklinton Underground Cinema
The movies enjoyed by Ingmar Bergman, in his private cinema on the island of Fårö. by Franklinton Underground Cinema
The three o’clock rite: Ingmar Bergman’s home cinema … Anita Grede’s tapestry, “The Magic Flute”, on Fårö, the only decoration inside the cinema, depicting a mix of mythological and local landscape. … Rules of engagement The three o’clock cinema was thus an institution. There were rules, of course (both explicit and implicit): 1. Punctuality Everyone is familiar with Ingmar’s penchant for punctuality. 2. Continuity Going to the movies on rainy days alone, or just watching especially interesting films, was out of the question. So was spending sunny days on the beach, or choosing to skip the more challenging films. What you needed, in short,… Read more

The three o’clock rite:
Ingmar Bergman’s home cinema


Anita Grede’s tapestry, “The Magic Flute”, on Fårö, the only decoration inside the cinema, depicting a mix of mythological and local landscape.

Rules of engagement

The three o’clock cinema was thus an institution. There were rules, of course (both explicit and implicit):

1. Punctuality
Everyone is familiar with Ingmar’s penchant for punctuality.

2. Continuity
Going to the movies on rainy days alone, or just watching especially interesting films, was out of the question. So was spending sunny days on the beach, or choosing to skip the more challenging films. What you needed, in short, was obsessive cinematic dedication. (Perhaps this dedication also included getting close to a father who had previously been absent from our lives, but that’s another matter.)

3. Willingness
Ingmar often told us it pained him to see how Liv Ullmann’s dachshund expressly revealed its boredom with a film. In other words, you weren’t allowed to get bored or fall asleep. I particularly recall a documentary about a sawmill. The film just went on and on – footage of logs being split in perpetuity.

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