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Three Girls

by feminamorte
“The genre was a winner for the movies, right from the start. Requirements were minimal: a big city, three pretty faces, some wolves. Sally, Irene and Mary was the first—silent but scrappy in 1925—a tale of three chorus girls looking for love and limelight in New York, New York (one of them was a hungry young actress named Joan Crawford). In Our Blushing Brides, 1930, it was three shopgirls—one of them, again, Joan Crawford. In 1932’s Three on a Match, the girls were childhood friends, all grown up and sharing bites of the Big Apple—shiny, wormy—only this time the Joan was blonde, as in Blondell. Throughout the 30s and into the 40s,… Read more

“The genre was a winner for the movies, right from the start. Requirements were minimal: a big city, three pretty faces, some wolves. Sally, Irene and Mary was the first—silent but scrappy in 1925—a tale of three chorus girls looking for love and limelight in New York, New York (one of them was a hungry young actress named Joan Crawford). In Our Blushing Brides, 1930, it was three shopgirls—one of them, again, Joan Crawford. In 1932’s Three on a Match, the girls were childhood friends, all grown up and sharing bites of the Big Apple—shiny, wormy—only this time the Joan was blonde, as in Blondell. Throughout the 30s and into the 40s, three-girls-in-the-city had to make room for three-boys-back-from-war. (In those days returning soldiers were as hopeful, as vulnerable, as young women.) Two is just two: left and right, yes and no, Goofus and Gallant. Four is fine for TV—see HBO’s Sex and the City—but one too many for film (A Letter to Four Wives was fixed by subtraction: A Letter to Three Wives won the Oscars). Three is destiny. When blushing brides play with matches, one girl wins, one draws, one dies.” — Laura Jacobs, The Lipstick Jungle

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