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Top Ten Films Of 2007

by Antisuttree
1) No Country For Old Men - USA, dirs. Joel Coen, Ethan Coen. Probably the best film by the Coen brothers and a near-perfect adaptation of the novel by Cormac McCarthy. The violence is only elemental. The philosophy is essential. Trailer 2) Zodiac - USA, dir. David Fincher. Fincher’s sixth feature (others include Se7en, The Game, and Fight Club) proves yet again that he is a rigorous, detail-obsessed master. This story of the Zodiac, America’s most fascinating uncaught serial killer, is also about (and written by) Zodiac expert, Robert Graysmith. Saw it twice in the theater, have seen it since, and am still putting pieces together.… Read more

1) No Country For Old Men - USA, dirs. Joel Coen, Ethan Coen. Probably the best film by the Coen brothers and a near-perfect adaptation of the novel by Cormac McCarthy. The violence is only elemental. The philosophy is essential. Trailer



2) Zodiac - USA, dir. David Fincher. Fincher’s sixth feature (others include Se7en, The Game, and Fight Club) proves yet again that he is a rigorous, detail-obsessed master. This story of the Zodiac, America’s most fascinating uncaught serial killer, is also about (and written by) Zodiac expert, Robert Graysmith. Saw it twice in the theater, have seen it since, and am still putting pieces together. Trailer



3) Control - UK/USA/Australia/Japan, dir. Anton Corbijn. A biopic of Ian Curtis, the late singer/lyricist of Joy Division and one of rock’s most unusual and enigmatic frontmen. Knowledge of Curtis and/or Joy Division isn’t necessary to appreciate this film. Fascinating, in stunning, high-contrast black-and-white. Saw it twice in the theater. Trailer



4) The Diving Bell And The Butterfly (Le scaphandre et le papillon) - France/USA, dir. Julian Schnabel. Beautiful and moving. The story of Jean-Dominique Bauby, former editor of Elle, who suffered a stroke that paralyzed his entire body except one eye, which he used to dictate his story into a book (by blinking, one letter at a time). Ten days after the book’s publication in France, Bauby died. The film is based on the memoir which shares its name. Trailer



5) Heima - Iceland, dir. Dean DeBlois. The film is simply gorgeous, demonstrating the beauty, purity, and majesty both of Iceland’s landscape and of Sigur Rós’ music. May help to enjoy Sigur Rós’ music already, but prior knowledge of the band isn’t necessary. Brought me to tears. Trailer



6) Ploy (พลอย) - Thailand, dir. Pen-Ek Ratanaruang. Even the very trailer is moving. A true visionary, Pen-Ek Ratanaruang isn’t filming the Thailand that is, but, rather, the Thailand that could be, that might be. Like all Ratanaruang films, Ploy—the scrutiny of a marriage’s foundation—is a journey with undulations and detours, and it is a journey worth taking. Trailer



7) Into The Wild - USA, dir. Sean Penn. People who see this film before reading the book are often more moved by it, but it’s a solid film and does get many bits exactly, perfectly right, and it also brought me to tears. The story of one of the USA’s most legendary vagabonds, who vanished into thin air by design. Based on the brilliant book by Jon Krakauer. Trailer



8) There Will Be Blood - USA, dir. Paul Thomas Anderson. It’s hard to believe that this Daniel Day-Lewis is the same actor from The Unbearable Lightness Of Being, and his versatile talent is visible in the newest film by P. T. Anderson of Boogie Nights and Magnolia fame. Based on the book, Oil!, by Upton Sinclair. A well-made period piece. Trailer



9) 4 Months, 3 Weeks And 2 Days (4 luni, 3 săptămâni şi 2 zile) - Romania, dir. Cristian Mungiu. Sickening, frustrating, sad, and disturbing are a few adjectives that come to mind when thinking of this film. Set in Communist Romania in 1987, two female college students demurely and secretively negotiate an illegal abortion, and all involved feel the repercussions. Trailer



10) Lust, Caution (Se, jie) - China/Hong Kong/Taiwan/USA, dir. Ang Lee. Ang Lee (The Ice Storm; Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; Brokeback Mountain) makes a Wong Kar-wai-like film in this period piece about love and political corruption in 1940s occupied Shanghai, and he yet again demonstrates his ability to move through wide-ranging spectra of subject matter. Trailer



Other Years’ Top Ten Lists: 2006 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012

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