Daily Briefing. Avant-Garde Masters

Black TV

First things first. There's an announcement from last week to catch up with: "Aldo Tambellini's Black Films and pioneering experimental works by four other filmmakers — Ian Hugo, the international banker-turned-artist who worked with Anaïs Nin; Mike Kuchar; Gregory Markopoulos; and Jud Yalkut — will soon be saved through the 2012 Avant-Garde Masters Grants from the National Film Preservation Foundation and The Film Foundation." Martin Scorsese, who began the initiative in 2003 through seed money from The Film Foundation: "There's no other program of its kind. I'm thrilled that the work of such artists as George Kuchar, Shirley Clark, and Kenneth Anger has been preserved and — equally important — made available so audiences can actually see these extraordinary films."

On a somewhat related note, Marilyn Ferdinand has put out a call regarding For the Love of Film: The Film Preservation Blogathon, taking place in just a couple of weeks now: "Bloggers, we need to know if you will be participating."

Reading. Fernando F Croce in Reverse Shot's Spielberg issue: "Catch Me If You Can [2002] combines technical mastery with emotional nakedness in ways that make Spielberg’s more solemn efforts look strained by comparison."

New York. Robert Aldrich's The Killing of Sister George (1968) screens tonight at the IFC Center and Simon Abrams reminds us that "the main draw is Beryl Reid's volcanic lead performance." Also in the L, Aaron Cutler recommends Stellan Rye's The Student of Prague (1913), screening as part of MoMA's tribute to Babelsberg Studios in conjunction with Kino! New Films from Germany.

Los Angeles. For Victoria Ellison, writing in the LA Weekly, the highlight of this evening's program at REDCAT, Bill Morrison: Miners, Bridges, Lost Love and Other Retrieved Treasures, is The Miners' Hymns (2011).

Austin. The 15th annual Cine Las Americas International Film Festival opens tomorrow and runs through Sunday. The Chronicle's posted a batch of previews.

London. Tomorrow at 8, Kurt Kren - Which Way to CA? "Close-Up present a unique screening of 18 films (all on 16mm) by Austrian filmmaker Kurt Kren. The series will be followed by Hans Scheugl's documentary Keine Donau - Kurt Kren und seine Filme, a thorough insight on Kren and his films."

The London Palestine Film Festival is on through May 3, with Susan Sontag's Promised Lands (1974) screening on Wednesday. The Guardian's Steve Rose finds that the film "benefits from Sontag's outsider's eye on how Israel represented itself to itself."

DVD. David Barker's Daylight is out tomorrow from Cinema Purgatorio, which has posted a clip in which Barker and producer Jay van Hoy discuss a few scenes.

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