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A Year Without Rent: Production Notes, Lucas McNelly

odilonvert

over 2 years ago

Ok from time to time I’ve been reading the production notes that Lucas McNelly writes on Garage for his project A Year Without Rent, and they are just marvelous.

So for all you filmmakers out there, as well as anyone else interested in film production or hell, the purely financial/business/organizational hero part of it (i.e., becoming a producer — many artists like and need a good, honest, helpful hand there), I’m starting this thread with the purpose of bringing more attention in the general forum to these wonderful production notes.

This latest one is hilarious. It’s a movie Lucas helped out with which is about the furries subculture.

Robert W Peabody III

over 2 years ago

That was fun Odi – I just found out there is such thing as a ‘furvert.’

odilonvert

over 2 years ago

^ LOL — yeah, the range of sexuality is pretty far and wide…

odilonvert

over 2 years ago

Shooting in a golf course and trying to avoid breaking someone’s window.

odilonvert

over 2 years ago

odilonvert

about 2 years ago

The big news in the crowdfunding world is the U.S. House passing the Entrepreneur Access to Capital Act. It was a rather overwhelming vote, which means that somehow Congress has found something Democrats and Republicans agree on. All by itself this is shocking. What the bill effectively does is open crowdfunding up to equity investments. Almost everyone thinks this is a fantastic thing.

odilonvert

about 2 years ago

Cheryl’s new film goes by the name of DECORATION. It is, to quote film’s webpage, a film “formed out of necessity, in order to create the work that will outline our careers; in the spirit of experimentation, the pursuit of honesty and the search for a unique voice.”

Practically speaking, what that means is that we’re making a film in Story, Arkansas. Population: 89. You read that correctly. 89.

odilonvert

about 2 years ago

After a week or so, every production becomes what it’ll eventually be, which is to say that things don’t change all that much beyond a point. Sure, in the first couple of days, stuff gets addressed and things change, but eventually it all settles into a routine. Very little changes past that point. Crews know that. Hell, they’re the first ones to figure it out and adjust accordingly. So if you’re on a set and the call is 9:30 and no one in the crew is ready to go at 9:30, that probably means that call time is a myth. Grips aren’t giving up a hour of sleep if you aren’t going to be ready to go on time. They aren’t stupid. A good way to see if something is an aberration or the norm is to see how the crew reacts. Or, you ask them. And then a pause is all you need.

odilonvert

about 2 years ago

This is why you get a Script Supervisor, because they’ll be damned sure if it was the cardinal or the bluejay. Hell, they’ll even tell you if it was hung straight. And it won’t take them all night to figure it out.

odilonvert

about 2 years ago

There’s no call sheet, but call time for day 4 is 9:30am. True to form, that doesn’t happen. We leave at 10:12am and head back to Nooner’s house to shoot the final day there.

Nooner has no idea we’re coming. He thought we were done. So, of course, he’s started to put his house back together. Luckily, he’s pretty easy-going, so it’s no problem to take his house back over.

odilonvert

about 2 years ago

…when you approach someone, you need to know what you’re getting. Is AYWR a good fit for every film? No. But it’s your project. You know what AYWR is and your should know what your project needs and requires.