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DIRECTOR INTRODUCTION- JERZY SKOLIMOWSKI

brady qw

about 3 years ago
“I like to think I live a quiet existence, staying away from the havoc of city life, keeping a low profile, enjoying splendid near-isolation.”

Jerzy Skolimowski handles his films with a sort of hard elegance- each shot gracefully moves into the next, with each image producing an impact on viewer which will always be remembered. The slow, methodical style Skolimowski uses (long takes, and centered, almost targeted shots) helps to accentuate the power of each visage he paints on the screen. Skolimowski shows a love, a passion for his camera- this passion is represented in each film he makes, in the actions of the characters and in the unrelenting imagery which accompanies these characters. The theme of passion turning to obsession is sometimes prevalent in his films- take for example, Deep End, the story of a young bathhouse attendant who develops an almost stalker-like relationship with the girl of his dreams. The reds, pinks, and purples of the film’s color palette further our own indulgence into the film’s seedy underground, and let us realize that the characters, though young, are not always innocent. Each has vice and sin of their own, and enough to spread to others.

As an actor, Skolimowski starred in his own films- Rysopis, Walkover, etc. From the 1970s to today, Skolimowski has become increasingly prevalent in his directing and has produced such incredible works as Bariera, The Shout and The Start. Born in 1938 Poland, he was originally a poet before he became a director. His first feature, Rysopis, was completed as a student. Since then, he was gone on to win many awards, including the Special Jury Grand Prize for his film The Shout in 1978. His most recent film is 2010’s Essential Killing, starring Vincent Gallo.

apursan​sar

about 3 years ago

An interesting director, his “Rysopis” and “Rece do góry” are films that I’m definitely looking forward to. “Deep End” didn’t impress me at all, but that’s no reason for me not to check out his Polish works. I’m curious to see which films you will be selecting.

toodead

about 3 years ago

i love barrier! hopefully this will get some appreciation for jan nowicki too…..though my favourite is hands up…but i really might be alone on that…i can’t wait for people to start watching his films…i’m so excited about this!……♥♥♥ to brady for choosing him.

Max painter

about 3 years ago

Yes!!!! So glad barrier is the first pick, it is one of my favorites. Also, I think this intro isn’t under the DC tab, making it a little harder to find.

brady qw

about 3 years ago

yeah, I’m gonna ask house or adam to move it soon.

Jaspar Lamar Crabb

about 3 years ago

Deep End is terrific. So is The Shout, Moonlighting and The Lightship. I had the opportunity to see SKOLIMOWSKI & ROBERT DUVALL present The Lightship at a film festival. It was quite a thrill…my “brushes with greatness” are limited to these two, Jane Russell, Tom Savini (on a NYC street!) and Vittorio Storaro.

brady qw

about 3 years ago

Deep End is amazing and it’s coming soon.

Kenji

about 3 years ago

The Lightship doesn’t seem to be on Mubi’s database

David Ehrenst​ein

about 3 years ago

One should never forget that Skolimowksi began as an actor. He and Polanski are featured performers in Wajda’s “Innocent Sorcerers.”

He co-scripted “Knife in the Water” and starred in his first two features “Rysopis” (“Identification marks: None”) and “Walkover”

“Bariera” is his first masterpiece.

Coming to the West he’s been all over the map, frequently working as an actor . But his latest “Essential Killing” shows he’s still got it in him.

David Ehrenst​ein

about 3 years ago

David Ehrenst​ein

about 3 years ago

David Ehrenst​ein

about 3 years ago

Ari

about 3 years ago

Has anyone seen Essential Killing yet? At first, it sounded too awful to be true (Vincent Gallo playing a Taliban fighter sounds like a bad joke) but the word is that it’s quite good.

Chasing Butterf​lies

about 3 years ago

More importantly, “Innocent Sorcerers” is a Skolimowski script. As the legend goes, Wajda, who was already a heavyweight, challenged a rather precocious Skolimowski to write a script. Jerzy returned with a script that was so good that Wajda took it up, and lo we have “Innocent Sorcerers”.

Brady, i’m hoping you’d put up “Identification Marks: None” at some point if Skolimowski goes through.

David Ehrenst​ein

about 3 years ago

David Ehrenst​ein

about 3 years ago

WBA

about 3 years ago

I love this guy and the films I’ve seen by him. I musrt say, that when I heard he would be coming back to filmmaking again in 2006 (I think, with a film from a Susan Sontag book, If I remember correctly), this was even better for me than the discovry of the lost Metropolis footage or a lost John Ford film!. After 17 years without making a film – simply great that he’s back in the game again! Something I wish that would or would have happen/ed to more retired or out-of-work filmmakers – there are hundreds of them. But as Terence Malick showed in the 90s: Wonders do happen! :-D

Will be watching “Essential Killing” at the cinema this month. :-)

Rissela​da

-moderator-
about 3 years ago

Deep End has been on my to see list for a long time. Not sure why I haven’t yet. I don’t know what I’m expecting though. Even this thread doesn’t give me much idea of what to expect. Except I keep seeing pictures of Skolimowski painting.

House 0f Leaves

-moderator-
about 3 years ago

Bookmark.

Jaspar Lamar Crabb

about 3 years ago

>>> Risselda…seek out Deep End…

My take…

A VERY unlikely coming-of-age film - John Moulder-Brown gets a job at a public bath house and is soon smitten with co-worker Jane Asher. Asher, who’s seeing two other men, could care less. It’s by no means straightforward. Instead DEEP END is gritty, funny, and ultimately tragic. That should be no surprise coming from the idiosyncratic Skolimowski. His films are always a mix of genres. Moulder-Brown is terrific as a the awkward adolescent and Asher has what is probably her best (certainly most substantial) film role. They have great chemistry together. There’s also an oddball supporting cast including Erica Beer as the bath’s bitchy cashier and one-time sexpot Diana Dors as one of Moulder-Brown’s kinkier clients. Karl Michael Vogler gives a fine performance as one of Asher’s callous lovers. The music is by Cat Stevens though its sparsely used.

Rissela​da

-moderator-
about 3 years ago

funny, and ultimately tragic

If they are both at the same time, then I’m in.

toodead

almost 3 years ago

released July 18th

profobl​ivion

almost 3 years ago

This is mostly a bookmark, but I wanted to say that I love Skolimowski. Four Nights with Anna is one of my personal favorite films, as well as many others. Thank you for starting this forum.

Deep End and The Shout are excellent