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GREAT MUBI CULTURAL POLL: FAVOURITE PAINTINGS

Kenji

about 2 years ago

We’ve had all sorts of polls, lists and competitions for films, but i thought it would be interesting to get a picture of the wider cultural tastes of Mubi users. So to start things off, paintings. Maybe books, music, poems, etc later….

Please submit a list of your favourite paintings- maximum 30.

Poll ends 1st April

Take your time, ideally to be submitted in one go. Plenty of paintings in the (very long) gallery of favourite paintings forum thread to draw on, from all round the world. If you want to post actual paintings, that’s where to do it.

Mine:

Rest on the Flight into Egypt (Gerard David)
Mokubo Temple and Vegetable Fields by the Uchi River/ 100 Famous Views of Edo (Hiroshige)
Hunters in the Snow (Brueghel)
Whistlejacket (Stubbs)
Procession of the Magi (Gozzoli)
Girl with a Pearl Earring (Vermeer)
The Fighting Temeraire (Turner)
Ginevra de Benci (Leonardo da Vinci)
Las Meninas (Velasquez)
Solitary Temple amid Clearing Peaks (Li Cheng)
Ranuccio Farnese (Titian)
Bacchus and Ariadne (Titian)
Staffa, Fingal’s Cave (Turner)
The Jewish Bride (Rembrandt)
The Birth of Venus (Botticelli)
Woman with a Balance (Vermeer)
The Dream of St Ursula (Carpaccio)
Farmer at Pont Llyfni (Kyffin Williams)
Early Spring (Guo Xi)
Buildings in Naples (Thomas Jones)
The Precious Book (Gwen John)
Tiger in a Storm (Rousseau)
Wat Phra Kaew murals (various)
Ville d’Avray (Corot)
Lovers (Utamaro)
Ryogoku Bridge/ 36 Views of Mount Fuji (Hokusai)
Old Man and his Grandson (Ghirlandaio)
Liberty Leading the People (Delacroix)
Krishna Lifts Mount Govardhan (Ustad Sahibdin)
Bougival, 1876 (Sisley)

Matt Parks

about 2 years ago

Wow, this is a tough one, kenji (great list, by the way). I’ll try to put a list together.

Kenji

about 2 years ago

I’ll do a Books poll after this, i think. I know it takes working out- too many i wanted to include but then it would be more work counting the results!

mais1

about 2 years ago

Sao Vicente de Fora (Nuno Goncalves)
A Blusa Azul (Adriano de Sousa Lopes)
Las Meninas (Diego Velazquez)
La maja desnuda (Francisco Goya)
Muchacha en la Ventana (Salvador Dali)
El Jardin (Joan Miro)

Jeanne Hebuterne with hat and necklace (Amedeo Modigliani)
Venus of Urbino (Tiziano Vecelli)
Primavera (Sandro Botticelli)
Two Sisters (Pierre-Auguste Renoir)
Un bar aux Folies Bergere (Edouard Manet)
Self-portrait in a straw hat (Elisabeth Vigee Le Brun)
Pathway in Garden at Giverny (Claude Monet)

The Sower (Vincent Van Gogh)
Portrait of a Lady (Rogier van der Weyden)
Girl with a Pearl Earring (Jan Vermeer)
Venetian Woman (Albrecht Durer)
Adele Bloch-Bauer I (Gustav Klimt)

Flower Vendor (Diego Rivera)
Yo y mis pericos (Frida Kahlo)
Etre Avec (Roberto Matta)
Abstracto II (Margarita Azurdia)
Bonampak frescos (anonymous, Maya)

The Lovers (attributed to Ustad Mohammadi)
Sigiriya frescoes (anonymous, Sri Lanka)
Nefertari and Isis (anonymous, Tomb of Nefertari wall painting, Egypt)
The Waves off the Coast of Kanagawa (Katsushika Hokusai)
Flowers of Edo : Young Woman’s Narrative Chanting to the Saisen (Kitagawa Utamaro)

Kenji

about 2 years ago

Great selection! A few in common, lots of goodies there, some to check out and i’m glad you have Venus of Urbino, as i would have picked it, but for 2 already by Titian. Also the Goncalves. Must see the Oliveira film. I almost picked Paula Rego

Matt Parks

about 2 years ago

The Basket of Apples (Cezanne)
Guernica (Picasso)
Wanderer above the Sea of Fog (Friedrich)
The Raft of the Medusa (Géricault)
Amoskeag Canal (Sheeler)
Self Portrait, 1658 (Rembrandt)
Allegory of the Art of Painting (Vermeer)
The Battle of San Romano (Paolo Uccello)
La Cena (Tintoretto)
A Bar at the Folies-Bergère (Manet)
Apocalyptic Scene with Philosophers and Historical Figures (McKendree Robbins Long)
The Third of May, 1808: The Execution of the Defenders of Madrid (Goya)
Suprematist Composition: White on White (Malevich)
L’Enseigne de Gersaint (Watteau)
Snow Mountain (Guo Xi)
Annunciation (van Eyck)
Isle of the Dead (Arnold Böcklin)
Bathers (Cezanne)
Automat (Edward Hopper)
The Absinthe Drinker (Degas)
Blue Nude (Matisse)
A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte (Seurat)

ZED

about 2 years ago

Las Meninas – Velázquez

DownByL​aw

about 2 years ago

Yeah, this is a tough one. I don’t think I’ll try since my results would be heavily weighted towards the rather small number of paintings I’ve managed to see in person. But I am curious, how many of the works on your list have you seen directly?

Kenji

about 2 years ago

I’ve not seen many in the flesh- some i’ve seen in Britain and France. Of course it’s a much better experience seeing the real thing. Maybe I should have picked Thomas Jones’ A Wall in Naples instead of Buildings in Naples, as it had a bit more impact on me “live”. I guess reading a book is a truer experience than second hand paintings. But even that can get disturbed.

ZED

about 2 years ago

Seeing the Mona Lisa in person is a waste of time, the way The Louvre displays it. The entire experience was a disappointment.

DownByL​aw

about 2 years ago

Kenji , paintings and books are really the opposite extremes, aren’t they? With most writers these days, there is not even an original manuscript. Music is an interesting contrast in that there is a lot recorded to be experienced very much the way books are. On the other hand, live performance is even more particular than paintings in being not only at one point in space but also one moment in time.

I would feel better about picking my favorite painters because I’ve seen at least one work from most of my favorites.

Girlfriend, is it behind glass? I’d rather not even try to look at something if I have to imagine what it would look like without the extra reflections.

Kenji

about 2 years ago

I was reading about the Mona Lisa needing restoration to its full former glory- what we’re used to seeing is not how it was, fresh and glowing.. It is a disappointment in the Louvre, so many crowded round, no chance to get a proper look; i’ve not heard of anyone who found it lived up to expectations, and we’re overused to the image too. Reaction to seeing paintings for real is altered by placement, light, condition, crowd etc, so even then there’s no standard. I was very taken with 2 small Corot paintings in Cardiff but in books they don’t look much- and it can work the other way.

Rissela​da

-moderator-
about 2 years ago

I’m just trying to get into painting more. Reading some online courses. Looking forward to the restults here.

Emma

about 2 years ago

@ Risselada http://www.moma.org/explore/inside_out/2012/03/05/my-favorite-cindy-sherman

Matt Parks

about 2 years ago

@ Down

I’ve seen . . . maybe half of those on my list. Some paintings definitely do need to be seen in the canvas to be fully appreciated (the Cezzane multiperspective still lives, for example).

Matt Parks

about 2 years ago

Anyone else? bump.

ZED

about 2 years ago

Mischa

about 2 years ago

Maybe books, music, poems, etc later….

How about architecture, too?

Too many paintings to list, but I’ll include a handful which have had the most impact upon me in terms of technique and composition:

San Giovanni Battista
St. John the Baptist
Leonardo da Vinci, c. 1516

Onderbreking van de muziek
Girl Interrupted at her Music
Johannes Vermeer, c. 1660

Het Joodse bruidje
The Jewish Bride
Rembrandt van Rijn, c. 1667

Majas en el balcón
Majas on a Balcony
Francisco de Goya, c. 1812

Det syke barn
The Sick Child
Edvard Munch, 1885

Портрет М.Я.Львовой
Portrait of Madame Lvova
Valentin Serov, 1895

I might add some more later.

Kenji

about 2 years ago

Thanks. More lists needed, please!

Bijoux Alexand​erplatz

about 2 years ago

Here’s a very short list. Looking forward to contributing a lot to the book list.

The Broken Column (Frida Kahlo)
A Bar at the Folies-Bergere (Edouard Manet)
The Nightmare (Henry Fuseli)
American Gothic (Grant Wood)
Sin Esperanza (Frida Kahlo)
Whistler’s Mother (James McNeill Whistler)
Premature Ossification of a Railway Station (Salvador Dali)

Brian Davisso​n

about 2 years ago

The Garden of Paradise (Unknown Rhenish Master, 1410)
View of Toledo (El Greco)
Saturn Devouring His Son (Francisco Goyá)
The Blessed Giles before Pope Gregory IX (Bartolomé Murillo)
Guardroom with Monkeys (David Teniers the Younger)
Fall of the Rebel Angels (Pieter Brueghel)
The School of Athens (Raphael)
The Metamorphosis of Narcissus (Salvador Dalí)
Garden of Earthly Delights (Hieronymous Bosch)
The President (Fernando Botero)
The Body of Abel Discovered by Adam and Eve (William Blake)
Morning of Good Friday (Max Jiménez) [This was the title of a chapter of one of his books, and the painting corresponds to it; I’m not sure if the painting has another name]
Manglares (Salarrué)
The Fountain of Youth (Lucas Cranach the Elder)
The Dangerous Liaison (René Magritte)
The Rehearsal (Edgar Degas)
Beata Beatrix (Dante Gabriel Rosetti)
Venus of Urbino (Titian)
Ruins Born from Other Ruins (Juan O’Gorman)

Brentos

about 2 years ago

Job and his Daughters (William Blake)
Sunset at Ivry (Armand Guilliaumin)
Summer Night (Winslow Homer)
In Bed (Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec)
Men of the South (Sean Keating)
Ulysees Off Connemara (Sean Keating)
Mephistopheles over Wittemberg (Eugene Delacroix)

i’m not really all that knowledgeable about art, but i can’t wait for the books and poems editions!

K

about 2 years ago

Whoa, there are a lot, but there is an exemplary appreciation on arts (paintings) when you have a direct contact with it, or there is a little space, a nexus, between the two of of you. The physicality of an object is also essential. You may say you like a painting but you only saw it on the internet; there’s nothing wrong with that. It’s still a form of appreciation, but to a lower degree.

Art is a great drug, especially when you reach its extremities.

apursan​sar

about 2 years ago

Anglada Camarasa, Chula Green Eyes
Anguissola, A Lady in a Fur Wrap
Bosch, The Garden of Earthly Delights
Brueghel, Procession to Calvary
Corot, The Greek Girl
Farshchian, The Warmth of Love
Hokusai, Great Wave of Kanagawa
John, Young Woman Holding a Black Cat
Kahlo, The Two Fridas
Katouzian, Moving House
Klimt, The Kiss
Koiso, Dancers in the Studio
Menon, Portrait
Millais, Ophelia
Munch, The Storm
Picasso, Woman Drinking Absinthe
Renoir, L’Estaque
Rubens, Fall of the Damned
Schiele, Death and the Maiden
Sher-Gil, Three Girls
Signorini, Young Girl Alone at Settignano
Sorolla, Sewing the Sail
Sughi, Theatre of Italy
Súrikov, Menshikov in Berezovo
Urlacher, The Dreamer
Van Gogh, Starry Night
Visconti, The Letter
Waterhouse, The Lady of Shalott
Wyeth, Christina’s World
Zuloaga, Bullfight at Éibar

Kenji

about 2 years ago

Unusual mix, some new to me. I’ve just been enjoying Zuloaga paintings especially- i only knew a few. I’m tempted now to do an Iberian gallery. Pleasant surprise to find Gwen John

apursan​sar

about 2 years ago

An Iberian gallery would be a great addition. Gutiérrez Solana is another Spanish favorite of mine who unfortunately didn’t make it on the above list.

Kenji

about 2 years ago

I also like Camarasa. Since not many paintings have been picked more than once so far, and with so many possibles to choose from, for a meaningful poll result maybe i should have allowed 50 paintings each, but i expected more replies.

--------

about 2 years ago

It’s Bruegel without an ‘h’ – at least that was his name when he painted the Calvary (sorry for my nitpicking;). I’m still compiling my list…

apursan​sar

about 2 years ago

You’re right, I got used to the Spanish writing of his name (he’s called Brueghel el Viejo), but it’s probably more appropiate to only use that writing for the names of his sons. Looking forward to your choices.

Matt Parks

about 2 years ago

Is it OK to add to my list, kenji (as long as I stay under 30 total)?

The Kitchen Maid (Vermeer)
One (number 31, 1960) (Pollack)
Gare St-Lazare (Monet)
The Valpinçon Bather (Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres)
Landscape in the Silesian Mountains (Friedrich)
Marat Assassinated (David)
Doubting Thomas (Caravaggio)
The Resurrection (Grunewald)