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SILENT FILMS & WESTERN FILMS SUGGESTIONS

Beneezy

over 4 years ago

BRING EM OUT BRING EM OUT!!!!

MY WEAKNESSES ARE WATCHING THESE FILM GENRES….I NEED TO WATCH MORE, MORE, AND MORE!

greg x

over 4 years ago

What have you seen and liked previously?

Beneezy

over 4 years ago

I’ve seen

Passion of Joan of Arc
City Lights
Nosferatu

and for western ive seen plenty but i need more

Joshua W

over 4 years ago

I can help with westerns:

The big ones: The Searchers, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, Fort Apache, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, Rio Grande, Red River, Rio Bravo, El Dorado, The Wild Bunch, The Good the Bad the Ugly, Unforgiven, Winchester ’73, The Naked Spur, Seven Men From Now

Personal favorites: Blood on the Moon, Pursued, Ballad of Cable Hogue, Keoma, Bend of the River, The Big Trail, The Tall T, Ride Lonesome, Ride the High Country, Once Upon a Time in the West, Jeremiah Johnson, The Proposition, McCabe and Ms. Miller, The Far Country.

There’s a ton more, but that’s a start.

EDIT: I don’t know how I forgot Ride in the Whirlwind and The Shooting, two Monte Hellman westerns, both great.

greg x

over 4 years ago

Well, you could try The Iron Horse and Three Bad Men to start since they are silent western’s by John Ford. Other than that, Murnau’s Faust, Sjostrom’s He Who Gets Slapped, Pabst’s Pandora’s Box, Shimuzu’s Japanese Girls at the Harbor, Ozu’s I was Born but…, Keaton’s The General, and Griffith’s Intolerance are a good selection of silents that should provide a breadth of examples from the silent era.

Beneezy

over 4 years ago

Whoo.

Josh, Out of all those films you put up, I’ve only seen three of them. The Searchers, The Wild Bunch, and Unforgiven.

BUT I WILL DEFINITELY check out the rest of them. Thanks a bunch!

dope fiend willy

over 4 years ago

Beneezy, let me offer some recommendations, and likely second many of Josh’s choices for westerns:

Red River
-great film about the first Cattle Drive on the Chisolm trail

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance
Jimmy Stewart, John Wayne, and Lee Marvin-directed by John Ford

For a Few Dollars More
-infinitely superior to Leone’s previous film that the title references. “A Fist full of Dollars” was a shot for shot remake of a better and more original Samurai film, but “For a Few Dollars More” is an artist making his first full grown strides as a master, and the comparison between the two or three may be worth watching all three films in sucession(Kurosawa’s Yojimob, Leone’s First full of Dollars, and then Leone’s For a Few Dollars More)

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly
-if you find Leone’s reworking of the Western to be as brilliant as many do, quickly move on to The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly, and also make it a point to see his

Once Upon a Time in the West
-leone’s last western, the biggest western ever, operatic even, and different in tone and more mature than his previous films. Also the only western that he was able to actually shoot in America, amongst some of the same beuatiful backdrops that John Ford made such great use of.

Oh My darling, Clementine
-great film by John Ford starring henry Fonda

dope fiend willy

over 4 years ago

for something a little lighter, I would recommend

The Cowboys
-John Wayne owns a ranch and all of his hands leave him, so he is forced to higher a bunch of teenagers to help him on his cattle drive.

McClintock!
-rollicking hoot about western society, starring John Wayne and Maureen Ohare.

Classics that I’ve never fully taken to:
StageCoach- like watching “Speed” in the wild west
The Wild Bunch- I have a disagreement with the filmmaker on his editing style, or rather the instances that he chooses to cut from one shot to another, to me it just feels off.

dope fiend willy

over 4 years ago

Silents:

Napoleon
-Abel Gance’s masterpiece. you can likely find a VHS copy at your local library, that is how I made my DVD copy by checking it out at the local library and copying it.

La Roue
-also by director Abel Gance, one of two of his films that were restored and released last year along with “Ja’cuse”, I find La Roue(The Wheel) to be the superior of the two in both story, technical innovation and artistic merit. Its about a man who lives near a train track who rescues a girl from a train wreck and raises her as his own. Later he and his son both fall for the girl-kinda weird, but the film’s images are highly poetic.

Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
-maybe the first great artistic film, it makes use of german expressionistic ideas to tell a conventional horror story.

Der Golem
-similar and probably superior to Caligari, and came out the same year.

Der Mude Todd(aka Destiny)
-from 1921 Fritz Lang film about lovers trying to beat the reaper

Siegfried
-the significant part of his two film series of the Die Niebelungen Saga. Siegfried is quite the spectacle.

Metropolis
-Fritz Lang’s uber-film, sort of like the Blade Runner of its day. And while I’ve never completely embrace Lang as a storyteller or serious artist, he can do big spectacle as good as Ridley Scott.

Sunrise
-F.W. Murnau introduces the world to cinema, with the kind of moving camera that would not be seen again until Orson Welles gave the world Citizen Kane(another film that was 15 years ahead of its time)

Faust
-Murnau’s version of the tale, from 1926, and you can see some of his ideas at work that he would put to use in Sunrise.

Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse
-great epic about the first World War, with some astounding simulated war footage, but not lacking on depth of characters either. Great American silent starring Rudolph Valentino

End of St. Petersberg
-I personally prefer Pudovkin’s silent films to the celebrated Eisenstein’s, and this is his best film in my opinion, although his other masterpieces “Storm over Asia” and “Mother” are striking and powerful as well

Greed
-sadly this film can only be seen by watching still frames that have been salvaged from destroyed prints, and even in this truncated version the film still runs at 4 hours long. Certainly up there with Welle’s “Magnificent Ambersons” in terms of the great tragedies in film history, but rewarding nonetheless.

dope fiend willy

over 4 years ago

others:

Lang’s Dr. Mabuse films are entertaining, but for me leave a little to be desired.

I never cared for Potemkin, it seems more like a documentary than a film at times

The Blue Angel is often praised by film critics, I could never see why

The Vampires is a fun serial, though lacking in artistic merit, if you can get your hands on it

Intolerance to me is just too antiquated. If you like watching shots that never move and nothing but long shots, then check out this blockbuster from 1916

The Pastoral french silent “La Tere” which is sort of a retelling of the King Lear tell is a fine film.

Don’t think Shane was mentioned. Hombre is a good western. Little Big Man is better. High Noon, of course.

Rossoneri Ultra

over 4 years ago

Yes, I agree with pretty much all the westerns suggested before me. How about a silent western, Beneezy? I suggest The Great Train Robbery (1903)

Jeb

over 4 years ago

If you enjoy The Cowboys, you might like the Shootist. It was John Wayne’s final film. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is another light western which is very watchable.
High Noon and Rio Bravo make an excellent double feature. Rio Bravo was Howard Hawks’ and John Wayne’s answer to High Noon which was believed by many to be a thinly veiled allegory for blacklisting in Hollywood. Hawks has been quoted as saying that the marshal (in High Noon) wouldn’t “go running around town like a chicken with his head off asking for help.”.
Others worth watching:
Johnny Guitar
Ox-Bow Incident
The Man From Laramie
Rancho Notorious
Hondo
Vera Cruz
High Plains Drifter
The Magnificent Seven
Ride the High Country

Casey

over 4 years ago

Just saw Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid again. Flawed, but wonderful.

Roscoe

over 4 years ago

For silent films, just immerse yourself in the work of Buster Keaton for a while.

Doinel

over 4 years ago

Have to second Keaton.

The General, Sherlock Jr., Our Hospitality, Steamboat Bill Jr., The Navigator … enjoy, I envy you seeing them for the first time.

Roscoe

over 4 years ago

And I’ll second the Gance films, but I’ll have to recommend J’ACCUSE over LA ROUE, which I’ve never been able to get through.

I can also recommend Pabst’s PANDORA’S BOX, with the magnificent Louise Brooks.

And Lang’s DIE NIBELUNGEN, an amazing accomplishment in any era. Stick with it, there’s really nothing like it.

Dan Bayer

over 4 years ago

If you liked City Lights, definitely go for Chaplin’s other great films: The Kid, Modern Times, and The Gold Rush are my favorites.

dope fiend willy

over 4 years ago

I just wanted to second Shane and High Noon, two great films that I had forgotten about.

And while I haven’t yet seen the Oxbow Incident, its John Ford directing Henry Fonda, so you can’t really go wrong there.

Roscoe

over 4 years ago

John Ford didn’t direct OX-BOW INCIDENT, it was William Wellman.

Francis​co

over 4 years ago

I love Eclipse’s SILENT OZU box set. They’re well made comedies anyone can enjoy. Good length too (90 minutes or so).

Westerns… I’m not too big of a fan. For a crazy absurdist genre-bending one, try Oldrich Lipsky’s hilarious LEMONADE JOE.
Jim Jarmusch’s DEAD MAN is my favorite, yet it’s almost like an anti-western.

H. K. ‡

over 4 years ago

safety last, greed, the gold rush. i don’t know much about silent movies, but i do know these are great films.

be sure to see ride the high country, an overlooked peckinpah gem. appaloosa is a good new western. alex cox’s walker is fun (and part of the criterion collection), but don’t expect anything serious. also some classics you may have already seen: my darling clementine, rio bravo, the wild bunch, the searchers.

Casey

over 4 years ago

The Gunfighter with Gregory Peck. Great little Western.

César

over 4 years ago

As far as silents go, anything with Lon Chaney is worth watching, I particularly enjoyed The Unknown co-starring Joan Crawford, a perverse little movie with great visuals and bizarre music.

filmfla​m

over 4 years ago

The Furies by Michael Mann. Walter Huston and Barbara Stanwyck. This is a very unusual tale with great acting. I can’t believe it’s not listed here already. it’s a Criterion. Sometimes referred to as a Western noir.

40 Guns by Sam Fuller. You’ll see Sam Fuller in Sergio Leone. This is Sam Fuller’s Western noir. It is amazing.

One Eyed Jacks by Marlon Brando. Brando plays the lead and directs. Karl Maldon plays against him.

The Great Silence by Sergio Corbucci. It’s a spaghetti. It looks like the Utah mountains in winter. Great scenes with deep snow and snow falling. An ending like no other. Kind of crude, like Leone’s Fistful, but very much worth watching.

Django by Sergio Corbucci. The first Django. Dozens more followed due to slack Italian copyright laws at the time. This is how Franco Nero got his start. Tarantino borrowed a lot from this one.

The first three easily make the all time Top Ten Westerns list along with some others already mentioned.

HAL 9000

over 4 years ago

Broken Blossems with Lillian Gish and Erich von Sroheim, directed by D. W. Griffith.

Matthew Sciclun​a

over 4 years ago

Metropolis and any Fritz Lang film…
Fritz lang is the s—-

Joshua W

over 4 years ago

FilmFlam, The Furies is by Anthony Mann.

streetcar desire

over 4 years ago

Silents Only, a partial list: 1 Sherlock Holmes Jr. 2 The Wedding March 3 A Woman of Paris 4 Docks of New York 5 The Last Command 6 Vampires and 7 Judex, very long French serials by Feuillade 8 Vampyr by Dreyer 9 4 hr restoration of Greed 10 Intolerance 11 Sunrise 12 The River by Borzage, restoration of partial 1+ hr with stills providing what’s missing! That"s enough for now—modern talking cinema could not exist without these 12 silents!

Danf

over 4 years ago

High Noon,
The Searchers,
My Darling Clementine (one of my faves!)
Fort Apache (great John Wayne moment at the end)
Stagecoach (great John Wayne moment at the beginning)

Silents, anything by Buster Keaton!
Also, Sunrise.