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STOP THE LISTS!

odilonvert

about 3 years ago

Black Irish

about 3 years ago

odilonvert

about 3 years ago

Drunken Father Figure of Old

about 3 years ago

have you listened to some of the classical music composed within the last several decades?

Are you referring to like electronic music? Even a lot of that I find more engaging than some serialism. Don’t get me wrong – I’m not down on serialism as a whole or as an idea, but I’m just saying it churned out a lot of pretty boring stuff. At least the electronic composers are making entirely new sounds (although I guess they did produce even more boring stuff than the serialists)!

But, for me, it seems like the best thing serialism has going for it is dissonance, and if I’m in that kind of mood I would most of the time rather listen to Penderecki or Ligeti.

Black Irish

about 3 years ago

I would include that, but not only those. There are some more recent, non-electronic, compositions I have attempted to get into but can’t. Elliott Carter would probably be the main example I can think of. Have listened to some electronic music and I’m frankly not that interested in it, also I would think ‘dissonant’ would more accurately describe those works than serialism.

Drunken Father Figure of Old

about 3 years ago

^ Just saw that your style picture is from Au Hasard Balthazar – is that a good introduction to Bresson do you think? That’s what I have at the top of my queue right now.

Black Irish

about 3 years ago

I’d say any of his films before ‘69 would be good introductions. Mine was actually A Man Escaped [which, unfortunately, I’ve not rewatched yet.] Couldn’t say whether you’ll like his aesthetic [and it can really alienate some people,] but content-wise I believe you would like it.

Drunken Father Figure of Old

about 3 years ago

Yeah it seems like he just has a style that you either like or you don’t… I’m pretty excited to finally watch one of his films!

ruby stevens

about 3 years ago

pickpocket gets my vote. that was my first and it was riveting

i don’t really think balthazar is a good intro lol. but good luck

Black Irish

about 3 years ago

Hope you enjoy it if you do see it this weekend and even if you don’t, that you’ll at least give him another chance (Haha.)

toodead

about 3 years ago

pickpocket gets my vote. that was my first and it was riveting

ruby are you confusing bresson with Out 1 again?

i just watched a garrel. it’s bad for me but i love it. and i think he confuses heroin with light.

ruby stevens

about 3 years ago

i will watch out 1 before i die. all 729 mins =D

i’ve watched nothing but silent films all week. and now i’m off to the big parade!

Black Irish

about 3 years ago

Ruby: You might be right, but it’s certainly better than his later films [you have to really love him to ‘enjoy’ those, in most cases.] ;P

Pickpocket, as I’d mentioned a long time back [in StL! years,] may be my favorite Bresson. Of course, I’ve noticed many people hate the central performance. But, oh well.

Magpies: Which was it?

Need to really get back into Garrel. Didn’t like my first, thought the second was ok but watched his short Rue Fontaine a month or two ago and loved it. What the hell? . . .

Bijoux Alexand​erplatz

about 3 years ago

Oh, Dffoo watch Balthazar because I thought I’d love it and I did not. At all :( So I’d like to hear your thoughts. I liked Pickpocket.

Loverof​LeCinem​a

about 3 years ago

I love Balthazar. Pickpocket was a bore.

@Black Irish
“people hate the central performance. But, oh well.”

What performance? Lol. From what I see Bresson puts his upmost effort into not creating performances or anything resembling facial emotion.

toodead

about 3 years ago

@ black irish

it was the wind of the night. and i spent most of the time wanting to make love to the dp. this is one of his later ones…..although pretty much every film i’ve seen from him is a variation on trauma, either ‘sad woman is sacred’ and/or ‘68’. this one was ‘and’, and it looked soooooo good.

(but then i watched sissako’s life on earth and spent most of the time wanting to make love to the director. he is cuuuuuuuute. having to watch all the mubis before they disappear has its upsides too!)

i haven’t seen a bresson i didn’t like.

tomas.roges

about 3 years ago

L’ARGENT

Pepo, a shy thief

about 3 years ago

Talking about Sissako and Out 1 makes my heart all aflutter.

toodead

about 3 years ago

i’ll watch out 1 one day. waiting for that upgrade though. not sure i can sit through all those hours of bad italian vhs rip…

Pepo, a shy thief

about 3 years ago

It’s not that bad, actually. Rivette takes you deep into the world so you don’t notice it as much as you’d think you would.

Plus… Juliet Berto…

toodead

about 3 years ago

no nono no no plus jp leaud. which means i won’t be waiting that long….this berto woman…pfffft!

odilonvert

about 3 years ago

I always wonder whether Bresson laughed much…

Loverof​LeCinem​a

about 3 years ago

This muthafucka certainly laughs

Bresson, however, probably never even cried as an infant.

Black Irish

about 3 years ago

Aside: Really need to start re-reading books more often. Had almost forgotten how much I’d enjoyed reading The Ghost Writer the first time around. Definitely think it’s one of my very favorite novels.

Magpies: Ah, so it’s one of the films available on here. Are they taking it down soon just for UK members or the site as a whole? Hate that fairly little, to my recollection, of his work is readily available to watch but at least a good deal of his films are posted on YT.

Lover: Touche.

Anyway, I can understand people feeling that way about the film though I love it just the same. At the moment, either of those films, as well as Journal, could be my favorite [though Balthazar has slipped in my ranking somewhat, but I still think well of it.] Perhaps I’d conider L’Argent as well, once I have the chance to see it again.

Odilon: I imagine Bresson as someone very serious when discussing cinema, his work or art in general but, like most people, are more ‘lively’ outside that element.

Falderal: ‘It’s not that bad, actually. Rivette takes you deep into the world so you don’t notice it as much as you’d think you would.’

Goddamnit, now I’m going to have to watch this when I originally wanted to wait for the DVD since I’m a masochist.

ruby stevens

about 3 years ago

cat von trier

Loverof​LeCinem​a

about 3 years ago

Cats….. CATS!!! >O

odilonvert

about 3 years ago

Odilon: I imagine Bresson as someone very serious when discussing cinema, his work or art in general but, like most people, are more ‘lively’ outside that element.

I don’t know, Irish. LOL I see him as being perpetually dour…

Black Irish

about 3 years ago

Well, to be fair, that’s all we can see of him now.

odilonvert

about 3 years ago

Yeah. That, and his weird hairdo.

Judicial Joe

about 3 years ago

The best film I’ve seen this year from any year. Rivette is my homeboy.

And Bresson loved to laugh. His list of the 10 greatest films ever made consisted of two Chaplin films.