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Take This Waltz - Glorifying Infidelity?

Sunny!

over 1 year ago

Alright, so just finished this film, was enjoying it a good deal up until the ending. Are we supposed to feel sympathy for the Williams character? It just feels to me like the characters in this film are pushed so far by their greed and lust to the point where there is no morality. There is so little effort to talk through their problems, and in the end they seem to be portrayed in a rather positive light. With that final scene of Williams on the ride alone, smiling and having a good time, I guess we are supposed to believe that her happiness is the most important thing and that we should feel comfortable with her decision to make her life happy, since after all, it is HER life. The thing I hate so much about this film though is that there is no effort shown AT ALL in Williams character. She leads a happy life, and really has no reason other than her own lust to satisfy. Disgusting. These characters don’t end up learning anything, and we don’t end up learning anything about them. All it seems to do is to celebrate weak mindedness.

What did you all think?

Uli Cain, Cinefidel¹³

over 1 year ago

The sympathy for the character would come from the fact she will not allow herself to be happy, because she only wants the ride and not the walk afterward.

I didn’t think it glorified infidelity at all, because we were shown that she was sliding back into a “boring” routine again.

In all, I liked the work in the film, but did not like the characters.

Sunny!

over 1 year ago

I disagree with “not allowing herself to be happy”. What I got from it, she definitely was allowing herself to be happy, that is why she did what she did. Now, how long that happiness lasts is the thing. She seems to be getting a rush through the temporary and not long term. I am really not sure what the film is trying to say with her relationship with Kirby. He seems to be portrayed as being one for a type of “open” relationship, with the threesome sex scenes and so on. Perhaps he is this restless spirit that she desires? Yet in the end, she does appear to be going through the motions and getting bored again, does this mean that it will just become harder and harder in the future to find her happiness? If the film was trying to critique her lifestyle, I don’t think it did a very good job at it.

Uli Cain, Cinefidel¹³

over 1 year ago

Maybe the film wasn’t trying to make a judgement, but represent a situation and let an audience take away from what they wish.

Personally, i don’t want films to tell me what to think.

Sunny!

over 1 year ago

Hmm.

Duncan Gray

-moderator-
over 1 year ago

I’m more worried that it glorifies poor writing—this movie touches a hot topic and has created debate accordingly, but I found the characters (well-acted) so awkwardly written that debating their actions is a dead-end. I’m still not sure if we’re supposed to think her neighbor is a sensitive artist who offers passion or a committed creep who offers only sexual release. Either way, it doesn’t do justice to the issue of a sympathetic woman getting bored with monogamy.

Sunny!

over 1 year ago

Yeah, your last sentence is pretty much how I felt Gray. I was comparing it to all these other movies that touched on the subject that I enjoyed much more, like Dreyer’s Gertrud and Varda’s Le Bonheur. I think the dialogue in Gertrud gave the subject’s character the much needed depth and just loved the way this sort of tale was presented in Le Bonheur, but here I am just confused and was left kind of frustrated by it all.

Uli Cain, Cinefidel¹³

over 1 year ago

I thought the writing was fine, it was somewhat repetitious, but not filled with bad dialogue.

I think Margo wanted a deep relationship, but couldn’t find the words to relate that, and Lou was fine with what they had. Kirby could supply something deeper, but went with baser instincts instead.

The problem with the film is Margo, and that she wasn’t a very likable character, even so much so that I don’t think Margo liked herself that much.

Matt Thornto​n

over 1 year ago

I agree with Duncan. It’s a poorly written film, and that’s why I didn’t enjoy it despite being a fan of nearly everyone involved (except Luke Kirby). I plan to give it another chance soon, but I was very disappointed.