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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database

DT

about 2 years ago

Quote for Kanye West: “We all self-conscious. I’m just the first to admit it.”

DT

about 2 years ago

Still for Burt Bacharach:

Quote: “I’ve written some really bad songs, which you’ll never hear. An example? ‘Underneath the Overpass.’”

Bio: “Burt Bacharach is, quite simply, one of the most accomplished composers of the 20th Century. In the ‘60s and ’70s, Bacharach was a dominant figure in popular music, writing a remarkable 52 Top 40 hits. In terms of musical sophistication, Bacharach’s compositions differed from much of the pop music of the era. Bacharach songs typically boasted memorable melodies, unconventional and shifting time signatures, and unique chord changes. Combining elements of jazz, pop, Brazilian music and rock, Bacharach created a unique new sound that was as contemporary as it was popular. Lyricist Hal David, Bacharach’s primary collaborator, infused Bacharach’s music with tart, melodramatic lyrics worthy of the best Tin Pan Alley composers. David’s bittersweet, unsentimental lyrics were often in striking contrast to Bacharach’s soaring melodies. While in the late 1970s Bacharach’s name became synonymous with elevator music (due in great part to its sheer familiarity), a closer listening suggests that his meticulously crafted, technically sophisticated compositions are anything but easy listening.”

Also, a quote for Stephen Sondheim: “There’s something inimical about the camera and song.”

DT

about 2 years ago

A better quality 856×480 version of the current still for The Tempest (2010) (click on the still for the full enlarged file):

(Or alternatively, this).

amiroo

about 2 years ago

Photo for Hamid Jebeli (http://mubi.com/cast_members/101764)

http://profile.ak.fbcdn.net/hprofile-ak-snc4/41784_56915968885_2997_n.jpg

amiroo

about 2 years ago

Photo for Iraj Tahmasb (http://mubi.com/cast_members/266722)

http://www.irfilms.com/Pastery%20Girl/images/iraj.gif

Polyglo​t

about 2 years ago

DT

about 2 years ago

A better still for Macbeth (2006) (I’m pretty sure the current one might be more a promotional shot – not to mention it isn’t cropped very well – sorry ’bout that):

Thanks to whoever for getting them processed, btw.

Also, re: Eric Idle, considering he’s starred in more films than he’s ever directed, I’d argue that his ‘Director’ subtitle should simply be a ‘Cast’ one.

Uli Cain, Cinefidel¹³

about 2 years ago

New image for Ring Finger

DT

about 2 years ago

Still for Eiko Ishioka:

Bio: "Eiko Ishioka (July 12, 1938, Tokyo – January 21, 2012, Tokyo) was an Oscar-winning costume designer, known for her work in stage, screen, advertising, and print media, and has been called “Japan’s leading art director and graphic designer.” Reported on January 21, 2012, Ishioka died of pancreatic cancer in Tokyo, Japan.

“Ishioka’s awards include the 1985 Cannes Film Festival Award for Artistic Contribution for her production design of Paul Schrader’s film Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters, a 1987 Grammy Award for the artwork for Miles Davis’ album Tutu, two 1988 Tony Award nominations for the stage and costume design of the Broadway play M. Butterfly, and a 1992 Academy Award for Best Costume Design for Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

“In 1999 she designed costumes for Richard Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen at the Dutch Opera. She designed costumes for Cirque du Soleil: Varekai, which premiered in 2002, as well as Julie Taymor’s Broadway musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, which premiered in 2011. She also directed the music video for Björk’s “Cocoon” in 2002, and designed costumes for the “Hurricane” tour of singer Grace Jones in 2009.

“Ishioka was the costume designer for the Beijing-2008 Olympics. In addition to her Oscar-winning work on Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Ishioka has designed costumes for all of Tarsem Singh’s films, including The Cell.”

She’s also missing a costume credit for Mirror Mirror, Dracula (1992) and Cirque du Soleil’s Varekai.

DT

about 2 years ago

Ramin S. Khanjan​i

about 2 years ago

Arby Ovanessian (http://mubi.com/cast_members/357982)

Uli Cain, Cinefidel¹³

about 2 years ago

New image from “http://mubi.com/films/what-women-want—2”



Uli Cain, Cinefidel¹³

about 2 years ago

ug, for What Women Want, sorry

Jerome Magajes

about 2 years ago

Vice Raid
http://forgottenfilmcast.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/vice-raid-2.png
http://forgottenfilmcast.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/vice-raid-4.png

Jerome Magajes

about 2 years ago

Las Vegas Lady
http://forgottenfilmcast.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/las-vegas-lady-3.png
http://forgottenfilmcast.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/las-vegas-lady-4.png

Jerome Magajes

about 2 years ago

Chrome and Hot Leather
http://forgottenfilmcast.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/chrome-and-hot-leather-3.png
http://forgottenfilmcast.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/chrome-and-hot-leather-2.png

DT

about 2 years ago

Sorry, Eiko Ishioka is also missing a costume credit for Immortals.

Mr. Arkadin

about 2 years ago

Michael Redgrave should be added to the cast of Dead of Night (http://mubi.com/films/dead-of-night).

Edna Sweetlo​ve

about 2 years ago

Michael Relph was more a Producer than a Director.

Add Joe Orton as Writer of Entertaining Mr. Sloane.

Arash Naim

about 2 years ago

new pic for :
Marco Ferreri


http://www.mardelplatafilmfest.com/25/prg/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/marco_ferreri.jpg

DT

about 2 years ago

Pic for Sam Worthington:

Quote: “I don’t care what people think of me as a person, but I do care what people think of my work, and whether I’m investing enough into it.”

DT

about 2 years ago

This is a duplicate of this.

DT

about 2 years ago

Andrew Lloyd Webber is missing his music (composer) credit for Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.

Still for said film:

Uli Cain, Cinefidel¹³

about 2 years ago

imge for Swashbuckler



The Correct​or

about 2 years ago

Duplicate entry:
http://mubi.com/films/flowers-of-the-sky—2
http://mubi.com/films/flowers-of-the-sky

Arash Naim

about 2 years ago

Still for :
The time that remains


http://2.bp.blogspot.com/__ECMaMvhL2E/TUNqEza9R6I/AAAAAAAAH5U/9cTe-m6HkIY/s1600/Still%2B4.jpg

Arash Naim

about 2 years ago

Georges Bataille

Pic :


http://poe1963.free.fr/images/bataille.jpg

Quote :

Eroticism is assenting to life even in death.

Bio :

Georges Albert Maurice Victor Bataille (10 September 1897 – 9 July 1962) was a French intellectual and literary figure working in literature, anthropology, philosophy, economy, sociology and history of art. Eroticism, sovereignty, and transgression are at the core of his writings.
Georges Bataille was the son of Joseph-Aristide Bataille (b. 1851), a tax collector, and Antoinette-Aglae Tournarde (b. 1865). Born in Billom in the region of Auvergne, his family moved to Reims in 1898, where he was baptized. He went to school in Reims and then Épernay. Although brought up without religious observance, he “converted” to Catholicism in 1914, and became a devout Catholic for about nine years. He considered entering the priesthood and attended a Catholic seminary briefly. However, he quit, apparently in part in order to pursue an occupation where he could eventually support his mother. He eventually renounced Christianity in the early 1920s.
Bataille attended the École des Chartes in Paris, graduating in February 1922. Though he is often referred to as an archivist and a librarian because of his employment at the Bibliothèque Nationale, his work there was with the medallion collections (he also published scholarly articles on numismatics). His thesis at the École des Chartes was a critical edition of the medieval manuscript L’Ordre de chevalerie which he produced directly by classifying the eight manuscripts from which he reconstructed the poem. After graduating he moved to the School of Advanced Spanish Studies in Madrid. As a young man, he befriended, and was much influenced by, the Russian existentialist, Lev Shestov.
Founder of several journals and literary groups, Bataille is the author of a large and diverse body of work: readings, poems, essays on innumerable subjects (on the mysticism of economy, poetry, philosophy, the arts, eroticism). He sometimes published under pseudonyms, and some of his publications were banned. He was relatively ignored during his lifetime and scorned by contemporaries such as Jean-Paul Sartre as an advocate of mysticism, but after his death had considerable influence on authors such as Michel Foucault, Philippe Sollers, and Jacques Derrida, all of whom were affiliated with the journal Tel Quel. His influence is felt in the work of Jean Baudrillard, the psychoanalytic theories of Jacques Lacan and Julia Kristeva, and recent anthropological work from the likes of Michael Taussig.
Initially attracted to Surrealism, Bataille quickly fell out with its founder André Breton, although Bataille and the Surrealists resumed cautiously cordial relations after World War II. Bataille was a member of the extremely influential College of Sociology which included several other renegade surrealists. He was heavily influenced by Hegel, Freud, Marx, Marcel Mauss, the Marquis de Sade, Alexandre Kojève, and Friedrich Nietzsche, the last of whom he defended in a notable essay against appropriation by the Nazis.
Fascinated by human sacrifice, he founded a secret society, Acéphale, the symbol of which was a decapitated man. According to legend, Bataille and the other members of Acéphale each agreed to be the sacrificial victim as an inauguration; none of them would agree to be the executioner. An indemnity was offered for an executioner, but none was found before the dissolution of Acéphale shortly before the war. The group also published an eponymous review of Nietzsche’s philosophy which attempted to postulate what Jacques Derrida has called an “anti-sovereignty”. Collaborators in these projects included André Masson, Pierre Klossowski, Roger Caillois, Jules Monnerot, Jean Rollin and Jean Wahl.
Bataille drew from diverse influences and used various modes of discourse to create his work. His novel Story of the Eye (Histoire de l’oeil), published under the pseudonym Lord Auch (literally, Lord “to the shithouse” — “auch” being short for “aux chiottes,” slang for telling somebody off by sending him to the toilet), was initially read as pure pornography, while interpretation of the work has gradually matured to reveal the same considerable philosophical and emotional depth that is characteristic of other writers who have been categorized within “literature of transgression”. The imagery of the novel is built upon a series of metaphors which in turn refer to philosophical constructs developed in his work: the eye, the egg, the sun, the earth, the testicle.
Other famous novels include the posthumously published My Mother (which would become the basis of Christophe Honoré’s film Ma mère), The Impossible and Blue of Noon, which, with its necrophilia, politics, and autobiographical undertones, is a much darker treatment of contemporary historical reality.
During World War II Bataille produced Summa Atheologica (the title parallels Thomas Aquinas’ Summa Theologica) which comprises his works “Inner Experience,” “Guilty,” and “On Nietzsche.” After the war he composed The Accursed Share, which he said represented thirty years’ work. The singular conception of “sovereignty” expounded there would become an important topic of discussion for Derrida, Giorgio Agamben, Jean-Luc Nancy and others. Bataille also founded the influential journal Critique.
Bataille’s first marriage was to actress Silvia Maklès, in 1928; they divorced in 1934, and she later married the psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan. Bataille also had an affair with Colette Peignot, who died in 1938. In 1946 Bataille married Diane de Beauharnais, with whom he had a daughter.
In 1955 Bataille was diagnosed with cerebral arteriosclerosis, although he was not informed at the time of the terminal nature of his illness. He died seven years later, on 9 July 1962.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Bataille