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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database

Ale/M

almost 3 years ago

The pic for “Il grande cocomero” (Archibugi) is taken from “Problemi di cuore”. Here the only right pictures I’ve found :

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Tadzio Bonapar​te

almost 3 years ago

THE LAST TIME I SAW MACAO (http://mubi.com/films/the-last-time-i-saw-macao)

Please correct the errors in the published synopsis
Por favor corrigir os erros na sinópse publicada

Correct synopsis/Sinópse correcta:

Trinta anos depois, estou a caminho de Macau, onde não voltava desde criança. Recebi um e-mail, em Lisboa, da Candy, uma amiga da qual não sabia nada há anos. Ela contou-me que se tinha envolvido uma vez mais com os homens errados e pediu-me que fosse para Macau, onde “coisas estranhas e assustadoras” estavam a acontecer. Cansado, depois de um longo voo, chego a Macau a bordo do barco que me levará de volta ao tempo mais feliz da minha vida.

Synopsis by: Blackmaria Produção.

L.

almost 3 years ago

http://mubi.com/films/hourglass is in b/w and the still is not from the film, here’s a better one

Thrift Store Junkie

almost 3 years ago

Grigori Kromanov

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Bio:

Grigori Kromanov (8 March 1926 Tallinn – 18 July 1984 Lääne-Virumaa) was an Estonian theatre and film director. He directed some of the best known Estonian movies, including Viimne reliikvia (Estonian: The Last Relic) and “Hukkunud Alpinisti” hotell (Hotel “Fallen Alpinist”).

His 1976 film Brilliants for the Dictatorship of the Proletariat is based on the 1974 detective novel Diamonds for the Dictatorship of the Proletariat by Yulian Semyonov.—WIkipedia

Owen Sound

almost 3 years ago

Franchot Tone

“Actors suffer from being half narcissistic and half self-critical.”

Franchot Tone was born into a well-to-do upstate New York family. Tone traveled the world with his parents and attended various schools, including The Hill School in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, from which he was dismissed “for being a subtle influence for disorder throughout the fall term.” He entered Cornell University, studying romance languages with an initial goal of eventually teaching in such. But he also joined Cornell’s drama club, becoming its president his senior year. The interest in theater would sow a seed soon to be germinated.

Tone had no interest in the family electro-chemical business. He decided to become a serious actor. He meant business by joining a theater stock company in the city of Buffalo, earning only $15 a week. He toiled with dedication, playing bit roles and educating himself in the theater business. He moved to Greenwich Village and auditioned for the New Playwrights’ Theater, making his Broadway debut in 1929 with Katharine Cornell in “The Age of Innocence”. Tone portrayed Curly in the flop Broadway production of “Green Grow the Lilacs” which would later be developed into the musical “Oklahoma!”. He later discovered the Group Theatre in New York formed by Lee Strasberg and Harold Clurman. This was the first functional school for “Method” acting in America, followed later by The Actors Studio, also under Strasberg. In late September of 1931 the theater presented its first production, “The House of Connelly”, with Tone and Morris Carnovsky in the leading roles. Tone appeared in “Big Night” and later appeared in “Success Story”, after which Strasberg proclaimed him as the best actor in the company. His performance in “Success Story” also prompted a contract offer from MGM. He moved to Hollywood in November 1932, although his aspirations as an actor did not include becoming a Hollywood star.

His first screen appearance was under the Paramount banner, not MGM, in The Wiser Sex (1932) starring Claudette Colbert. The Paramount brass did not see the potential, a telling sign of the chasm between Hollywood acting and that of the theater. Tone, however, was definitely on the “A” List ladder, His first MGM film, Today We Live (1933) co-starred the ambitious Joan Crawford. Here his woes with Hollywood actresses began in earnest. He and Crawford became a couple, and MGM could see the potential for better box office by pairing them in several movies. Tone worked through 1933 with other leading ladies, such as Loretta Young, Miriam Hopkins and Jean Harlow, before he worked again with Crawford. However, he was already being saddled with “the other man” roles. In his next movie with Crawford, Dancing Lady (1933), he was competing with Clark Gable. By their next movie together, Sadie McKee (1934), Tone was the leading man but in forthcoming outings with Crawford he would have other film rivals and his characters tended to be less dynamic than hers.

He was loaned to Warner Bros. for Dangerous (1935) with ‘Bette Davis’. Davis also became romantically interested in him, and her incipient rivalry with Crawford made her all the more incensed with Crawford on finding out that she was engaged to Tone. Davis was envious and ashamed of her advances toward Tone, and the incident is believed by many sources to be the start of the famous warfare between Crawford and Davis that lasted to their dying days. Tone and Crawford did marry in late 1935, but the chemistry did not gel. Tone was an Eastern blueblood who shunned the artificial Hollywood lifestyle, while the unsophisticated Crawford could not get enough of it, and publicity. Those differences and Crawford’s bigger star power became glaringly obvious when the media labeled him “Mr. Joan Crawford”. Tone’s film career did not match Crawford’s phenomenal rise, and he was still dedicated to substantial support of Group Theatre productions. The marriage goals and the money diverged sharply; they divorced in March of 1939.

Tone was most definitely becoming a matinée idol name. In 1935 he had two big hits, proving his wide range and depth as an actor. His whimsical demeanor lent well to comedic roles, which is why his wisecracking Lt. Forsythe in The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935) rang true. He also had considerable dramatic power, as seen in the second of these movies, the much anticipated Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) with his former co-star Gable. He, Gable and co-star Charles Laughton all received Oscar nominations for best actor. This was a first, and certainly an embarrassment which the Academy sought to remedy by introducing Best Supporting Actor and Actress Oscars the next year. Though Tone had other substantial roles through that decade, he seemed ready for a break with his film career. He suddenly returned to Broadway, and was able to thumb his nose at Hollywood due to the great success of his 1940 role as a newspaperman in Ernest Hemingway’s “The Fifth Column”. Unfortunately for him, MGM pointed out that he was still under contract to them, so he had to return.

Tone had stimulating enough roles while with MGM until 1944, particularly the World War II adventure Five Graves to Cairo (1943) which Cary Grant turned down because he didn’t want to spend the summer in the Arizona desert, where it was being shot. Thereafter Tone worked to beat Hollywood at its own game. He freelanced at other studios and concentrated on parts that would expand his talents. He started working towards that goal with Universal’s critically successful Phantom Lady (1944), in which he played a psychotic killer. He also began producing films that he felt would be challenging and successful. One of his best efforts in this capacity was the psychological B noir The Man on the Eiffel Tower (1949) as star and producer, with his great friend Burgess Meredith as director. However, his success as an actor and producer didn’t extend to his personal life, and he still couldn’t get past his weakness for marrying Hollywood starlets. By 1948 he divorced his second wife, Crawford rebound Jean Wallace. Between 1950 and 1952 he was embroiled in the most foolish act of his career: his involvement with actress-turned-prostitute Barbara Payton. Just about everyone in Hollywood warned him against getting involved with Payton, including ex-wife Crawford. He failed to heed those warnings, however, and soon married her. The marriage only lasted a few weeks, and he paid a pretty heavy price: a hospital stay because of some fairly serious injuries (broken cheekbone and nose and a concussion) that required surgery after he was attacked and beaten by one of Payton’s most possessive boyfriends, brutish actor Tom Neal. The uproar over this assault ended Neal’s acting career.

Tone’s distancing himself from Hollywood continued into the 1950s, proving that dedicated stage acting and Hollywood usually did not mix. However, his need to adapt and mold the acting profession continued unabated. He saw the great potential of TV to provide both a live and economically filmed (the new videotape format) spectrum of stage plays. For a decade he was heavily involved in the medium and contributed over 30 performances in a number of prestigious TV playhouse productions. He didn’t forget Broadway, though. In 1957 he scored a triumph in Eugene O’Neill’s “A Moon For The Misbegotten”, and even his personal life brightened considerably. His last wife was much more amenable to being a helpmate. Dolores Dorn helped with his ambitious production of “Uncle Vanya” both Off-Broadway and in a lukewarm film version in 1958. When the more formal playhouse programs were replaced by TV drama story hours, Tone was again an enthusiastic contributor. He also worked in episodic TV from the late 1950s, notably a turn in a fondly remembered episode of the classic “The Twilight Zone” (1959).

He did not give up on the silver screen in his last decade. He turned in a memorable performance as the president in Advise & Consent (1962), directed by Otto Preminger. Though he had planned on retiring from acting at the beginning of the ’60s, he in fact was working into the year of his death. Along with co-buying Theater Four in New York to launch new plays, he planned another personal multi-tasking (starring in and directing) film effort of the life of artist Auguste Renoir, but that was not to be. In reality, the title of his last film before his passing was as prophetic for him is for all of humanity – Nobody Runs Forever (1968). — IMDb

Ben 94

almost 3 years ago

KARINE VANASSE
http://mubi.com/cast_members/21821
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MYRIAM VERREAULT
http://mubi.com/cast_members/68138
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HENRY BERNADET
http://mubi.com/cast_members/68139
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Ale/M

almost 3 years ago

Paola Tiziana Crociani (La Bella Vita) is Paola Tiziana CRUCIANI

Picture for “Tre Colonne In Cronaca”

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Thrift Store Junkie

almost 3 years ago

Adriaan Ditvoorst

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Bio:

Adriaan Ditvoorst (23 January 1940 – 18 October 1987) was a Dutch film director and screenwriter. He directed nine films between 1965 and 1984. His 1967 film Paranoia was entered into the 17th Berlin International Film Festival.—Wikipedia

J&K

almost 3 years ago

Andre De Toth quote:

[On filmmaking] “I’ll try to undress in front of you, to reveal the love of my life, my addiction to making images, creating people who come to life on the screen—a screen of any size in any format. I’ll tell the truth as I see it on celluloid or in bronze.”

source

J&K

almost 3 years ago

Phil Karlson quote:

“Not matter what I did in the smaller studios, they thought it was fantastic, because nobody could make pictures as fast as I could at that time, and get some quality into it by giving it a little screwier camera angle or something.”

source

DT

almost 3 years ago

This HAS to be the still for Tetro. It’s just too cool to turn down.

Edna Sweetlo​ve

almost 3 years ago

Michael Reeves who had nothing to do with Batman: Mask of the Phantasm

Monsieur Zom

almost 3 years ago

It may be in B&W, but considering its quality I think this picture should replace the current Tecnica di un omicidio picture.

DOUGLAS REESE

almost 3 years ago

Image for The Return

This is a misspelled copy of this

DT

almost 3 years ago

More Tetro still alternatives:

Polyglo​t

almost 3 years ago

Audrey Fleurot

Bio:
Audrey Fleurot (born 1977) is a French film actress who has appeared in French film and television programmes. She starred in the 2008 film Bébé and the television series La reine et le cardinal, Engrenages and Un village français. In 2011, she had a minor role in the Woody Allen film Midnight in Paris. -Wikipedia

jesse brossoi​t

almost 3 years ago

The current still for Stan Brakhage’s Dog Star Man: Part 1 is…. shitty.

I suggest this as an alternative.

g legs

almost 3 years ago

The Bourne Legacy should have a running time of 135 minutes, as seen on imdb.

Ale/M

almost 3 years ago

L’Ombrellone (Dino RIsi) is a color movie. Here some color pictures

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DT

almost 3 years ago

Pic for Hugh Laurie:

DT

almost 3 years ago

Alternative stills for Youth Without Youth:

Or if not that, then a HD version of the current one.

Ramin S. Khanjan​i

almost 3 years ago

Profile picture for Atsushi Wada (http://mubi.com/cast_members/339037)

Thrift Store Junkie

almost 3 years ago

Ale/M

almost 3 years ago

Pic for “Cenci in Cina” (Italian Chinatown)

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Please add in the cast list Novello Novelli

Nathan Heigert

almost 3 years ago

Still suggestions for Modern Romance

Thrift Store Junkie

almost 3 years ago

PAUL CALINESCU

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Bio:

Paul Calinescu (23 August 1902 – 25 March 2000), known as the father of Romanian cinema and a winner of the top prize at the prestigious Venice Film Festival, was a Romanian film director and screenwriter. He directed 14 films between 1934 and 1964.

In the early 1930s, Calinescu made Romania’s first professional documentary films. In 1938 “Tara Motilor,” a production dedicated to the Romanians living in Western Carpathian Mountains, was awarded the top prize in the documentary section at the Venice Film Festival.

“He was the maestro, the respected and beloved colleague of all Romanian cinema artists,” the Sahiafilm Studio said.

In 1996, he was given the title of Bucharest’s Honorary Citizen. Calinescu died at 98 in Bucharest. The studio’s statement gave the cause of death as “old age.”—Wikipedia

ruby stevens

almost 3 years ago

laird cregar

Laird Cregar (July 28, 1913 – December 9, 1944) was an American film actor.

Samuel Laird Cregar was the youngest of six sons of Edward Matthews Cregar, a cricketer and member of a team called the Gentlemen of Philadelphia. They toured internationally in the late 1890s and early 1900s. Laird’s mother was the former Elizabeth Smith.
Laird Cregar was educated at Winchester College in England, spending his summers as a page boy and bit player with the Stratford-upon-Avon theatrical troupe. Upon completing his schooling, Cregar won a scholarship at California’s Pasadena Playhouse, supporting himself as a nightclub bouncer when funds ran out. So broke that at times he had to sleep in his car, Cregar forced Hollywood to pay attention to him by staging his own one-man show, in which he portrayed Oscar Wilde.

After a few minor film roles, Cregar was signed to a 20th Century-Fox contract; among his first major roles was the middle-aged Francis Chesney (at the age of only 24) in Charley’s Aunt (1941), the first of several showcases for the actor’s delightful comic flair. With his sinister portrayal of the psychopathic detective in I Wake Up Screaming (1941), he followed that up with the successful screwball comedy Rings on Her Fingers (1942) playing a con artist opposite Gene Tierney. Cregar became one of filmdom’s top “heavies” — both figuratively and literally. Seldom weighing less than 300 pounds (136 kg) throughout his adult life, Cregar became obsessed with his weight.
After top billing in The Lodger (1944), who may or may not be Jack the Ripper, the increasingly sensitive Cregar was growing tired of being thought of as merely a hulking villain.

When assigned the role of demented pianist George Bone in Hangover Square (1945), Cregar decided to give the character a “romantic” veneer, and, to that end, lost more than a hundred pounds on a crash diet which included prescribed amphetamines. The strain on his system resulted in severe abdominal problems; a few days after undergoing stomach surgery, Cregar died of a heart attack. He was 31 years old. Hangover Square was released two months after his death.
Cregar was laid to rest in a simple grave beside the road in the Eventide Section, at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California. —wikipedia

Uli Cain, Cinefidel¹³

almost 3 years ago

New (cleaner) image for The Last Boy Scout



g legs

almost 3 years ago

Delete this page as it already exists here.

Ale/M

almost 3 years ago

Sonia Aquino (born July 10, 1977 in Avellino) is an Italian actress.
Theatre, cinema and television actress, she graduated at the National School of the Cinema (Scuola Nazionale di Cinema) in Rome and attended Francesca De Sapio’s Duse Studio. Moreover she studied performing arts at the theatre “Bellini” in Naples, taking part in some stages held by Peter Del Monte, Marco Bellocchio e Maurizio Nichetti. She has most notably appeared in the movie The Life and Death of Peter Sellers as Sophia Loren.__Wikipedia

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