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The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database

Experim​entoFil​m

over 1 year ago

Thrift Store Junkie

over 1 year ago

Betty Bronson

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Quote:

“Joan [Crawford] was glittering at all times, sophisticated and very grown up. She completely swept Doug [Fairbanks Jr.] off his feet. I didn’t smoke or drink and Doug was my first regular boy friend. I must have been terribly dull, so it was only natural that he should marry Joan.”

Bio:

Betty Bronson (November 17, 1906 – October 19, 1971) was an American television and film actress who began her career during the silent film era. She was a famous actress in silent and sound films.

She was born Elizabeth Ada Bronson in Trenton, New Jersey to Frank and Nellie Smith Bronson. She began her film career began at age of sixteen with a bit part in the film Anna Ascends. At seventeen, after she had pleaded with every friend she had at Paramount Pictures, she finally got an interview with J. M. Barrie, author of Peter Pan. Barrie personally chose her to play the lead in a film of his work Peter Pan which would be released in 1924. This film role had been sought by both Gloria Swanson and Mary Pickford, but Bronson won the role through her natural lightness and grace, probably refined through training with the Ballets Russes. Though she was with them for only a short time, perhaps a couple of weeks, it proved helpful in enhancing her portrayal of Peter Pan, especially in the flight sequences.

She starred with Mary Brian (Wendy Darling) and Esther Ralston (Mrs Darling), and the three of them became very close friends for the rest of their lives.

Bronson became an instant success in the year following the release of Peter Pan. She had a major role in the 1925 silent film adaptation of Ben-Hur. In 1926, she starred in another Barrie story A Kiss for Cinderella, an artfully-made film that failed at the boxoffice. She had moderate success for the rest of her career. She made a very successful transition into sound films. Her first sound film was in The Singing Fool (1928) with Al Jolson, and she also starred in the follow-up film Sonny Boy (1929) with Davey Lee. She was the leading lady opposite Jack Benny in the romantic drama The Medicine Man (1930).

Bronson continued film roles until 1933 when she married Ludwig Lauerhass, with whom she had one child, Ludwig Lauerhass, Jr. She did not appear in films again until Yodelin’ Kid from Pine Ridge (1937), starring Gene Autry. She resumed acting in the 1960s appearing in episode television roles and feature films. Her last film role was an uncredited part in the television biopic Evel Knievel (1971).

Bronson was always rather reclusive with the press, but she did get some attention after being seen with Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.. He had his first childish crush on her, and as he remembered in his autobiography The Salad Days, he stated:

“Another important picture had just started. It was Peter Pan, directed by a clever caricature of a wildly temperamental movie director, Herbert Brenon. After exhaustive tests, Betty Bronson, a pretty and gifted girl in her middle teens, was given this famous role… I fell for Betty! It was my first intensely juvenile, deep-sighs-and-bad-sonnets love. It was not fully requited. She only flirted with me. My rival was a fellow in his twenties, a newspaperman who was to become one of New York’s most respected theater critics, Richard Watts, Jr. …In any event, I was so smitten with Betty, I could think of little else, except when I could call on her, even though her overprotective mother was always just in the next room.”

In any case, it is known that Bronson kept all of his letters, bad sonnets and all, and she spoke of him fondly until her dying day.

On October 19, 1971, Bronson died after a protracted illness in Pasadena, California and was interred in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale.—Wikipedia

Experim​entoFil​m

over 1 year ago

Original-language title of The Legend of Blood Castle = Ceremonia sangrienta

Thrift Store Junkie

over 1 year ago

Gladys Brockwell

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Quote:

[On the musical scores provided for her films] “I’m going to write my own music hereafter. And a man who ‘passes it up’ in favor of the ideas of his own musician is going to get a personal letter from me, with my opinion of him written in red ink.”

Bio:

Gladys Brockwell (September 26, 1893 – July 2, 1929) was an American actress whose career began during the silent film era.

Born Gladys Lindeman in Brooklyn, New York, she was the daughter of a chorus girl who put her on stage at a very early age. By the time she reached her middle teens, she was already a veteran and taking on dramatic leading roles. She made her East Coast film debut in 1913 as Gladys Brockwell for Lubin Studios and within a short time was starring in a number of films. Developing her craft, Brockwell moved to Hollywood where she earned herself an important role in the acclaimed 1922 version of Oliver Twist and in The Hunchback of Notre Dame the following year.

Never one of the glamorous leading ladies, by the mid 1920s she was past the age of thirty and although still given top female billing, Brockwell performed mainly in supporting roles. Regarded as one of the finest character actresses of the day who not only adapted to the new talkies but excelled in them, her first appearance in a “talkie” came in 1928 in Lights of New York. Her performance received strong reviews at the time of the film’s release and as well by present-day critics of the preserved film.

A Warner Bros. feature length production, Lights of New York was filmed with microphones strategically hidden around the sets, creating the first motion picture released with fully synchronic dialogue. She was then signed by Warner Bros. and was looking forward to continued success in talkies.

On June 27, 1929 Gladys Brockwell and friend Thomas Brennan were involved in an automobile accident near Calabasas, California. Brockwell was crushed beneath the automobile driven by Brennan, an advertising man from Los Angeles, California. The auto went over a 75-foot (23 m) embankment on the Ventura Highway near Calabasas.

Seriously injured, the thirty-five-year old Brockwell died a few days later in a Hollywood hospital. Her physician, Dr. Norman P. Sprague, said death was the result of peritonitis. Four blood transfusions were performed in an effort to save her life, the last just prior to her death. Brennan recovered after sustaining serious injuries. He said a bit of dust had blown into his eye, temporarily blinding him.

Gladys Brockwell’s final film The Drake Case was directed by Edward Laemmle while she was on loan to Universal Pictures, and was released posthumously in September 1929.—Wikipedia

Thrift Store Junkie

over 1 year ago

Alice Joyce

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Quote:

“Even though I am extremely busty, I think it well worth my while to create a good impression in the first picture since my retirement. I would not fail for the world and it is better to be twice sure than once sorry.”

Bio:

Alice Joyce (born October 1, 1890 – October 9, 1955) was an American actress, who appeared in more than 200 movies during the 1910s and 1920s, perhaps best known for her roles in the 1923 silent and 1930 talking versions of The Green Goddess.

Alice Joyce was born in Kansas City, Missouri to John Edward and Vallie Olive McIntyre Joyce (1873–1938). She had a brother, Francis “Frank” Joyce (1893–1935), who was 2 years younger who later became an entertainment manager.

By 1900, her parent’s marriage fell apart, and her father, John, took custody of little Alice and Frank and moved to Falls Church, Virginia, where Joyce spent most of her childhood. According to the 1910 Census, her mother, Vallie, remarried in 1900 to Leon Faber, and they resided in the Bronx, New York, along with Alice and her brother, Frank, where she was employed as a “photographer’s model” and appeared in illustrated songs.

It was director Sidney Olcott at the Kalem Company in New York City who gave Alice Joyce her first chance, casting her in his 1910 production, The Deacon’s Daughter. She was eventually sent to work under director Kenean Buel on the West Coast after Kalem acquired the old Essanay Studios property in East Hollywood in October 1913. Joyce spent time with Kalem (1910–1915) and Vitagraph (1916–1921), later worked as independent for various studios. Her stardom began to wane with the advent of sound motion pictures.

Alice Joyce was married three times, the first time in 1914 to actor Tom Moore with whom she had a daughter, Alice Joyce Moore (1916–1960). They divorced in 1920. The same year she married James B. Regan, son of the managing director of the old Knickerbocker Hotel; her second daughter was born during this union. They divorced in 1932. The actress eventually went bankrupt before she married for a third time. Her last marriage came in 1933 in Virginia City, Nevada, to film director Clarence Brown; they separated in 1942 and divorced in 1945. The actress retained Brown’s name. During their separation, she sued him for reparation on cruelty charges. She resided in Northridge, California. In 1946. Brown remained with Joyce for nine hours after she was seriously injured in a traffic accident and paid her medical bills.

Joyce was known as “The Madonna of the Screen” for her striking features and presence. She made her last movie in 1930, after which she and ex-husband Tom Moore worked a late vaudeville circuit for a time. She declared voluntary bankruptcy in 1933. Joyce was active in San Fernando Valley women’s organizations in her later years. She did book reviews and made sketches for friends.

The actress was ill for several years before her death from a blood and heart ailment at Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital. She was 65 years old. On her death in 1955, Alice Joyce was interred next to her mother, Vallie,in the San Fernando Mission Cemetery in Mission Hills, Los Angeles, California. Alice Joyce was survived by two daughters, Mrs. Alice Moore de Tolley of Dover, Delaware and Mrs. Peggy Harris of Clark Fork, Idaho. The actress also had one grandchild and a nephew. She left an estate valued at $175,000, with a gross income of approximately $27,600. Her daughters received a collection of jewelry, including an eight-carat (1.6 g) emerald-cut diamond ring and a 55 carat (11 g) star sapphire ring. The remainder of the estate was placed in trust under terms of the will. The income from this was divided equally between Joyce’s daughters.—Wikipedia

Ale/M

over 1 year ago

the pic for Äta sova dö is from Haute Tension (Alexander Aja)

AstralF​orest

over 1 year ago

Still for:

The Glory Stompers

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Thrift Store Junkie

over 1 year ago

Peter Elfelt

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Quote:

[When asked if he had ever filmed a drama, he remembered being reluctant about this film, Capital Execution] “For one to think of showing this murder in living pictures – a horrible idea. I was absolutely not taken by it.”

Bio:

Peter Elfelt (1866–1931) was a Danish photographer and film director known as the first movie pioneer in Denmark when he began making documentary films in 1897.

Peter Elfelt was born Peter Lars Petersen in Denmark on 1 January 1866. (He changed his name to Elfelt when he began making films.) He apprenticed in photography in Hillerød in 1893 with the photographer Carl Rathsack. He also studied with the camera builder Jens Poul Andersen. In 1893, Elfelt opened his own atelier in Copenhagen with his two brothers as his assistants. As his photographic skills became appreciated, his business flourished and by 1901 Elfelt was named “Kongelige Hoffotograf” (Royal Court Photographer).

During a trip to Paris in 1896, Elfelt obtained a set of detailed Cinematographe plans from the French inventor Jules Carpentier. He had a film camera constructed by Jens Poul Andersen. In the beginning of 1897, he shot the first Danish film — a one minute sequence called Kørsel med Grønlandske Hunde (Traveling with Greenlandic Dogs). During the following 15 years, he made short nature films and newsreels about the Danish royal family. Elfelt shot almost 200 short films in all.

In 1903 Elfelt filmed his only drama. The short film, titled Henrettelsen (Capital Execution), was the first fiction film made in Denmark. Based upon the actual execution of a French woman who murdered her 10 children, it starred the singer Francesca Nathansen and was filmed in the arcade of the Christiansborg Castle. There is some doubt whether the film was ever shown in public. When Elfelt was asked in 1926 if he had ever filmed a drama, he remembered being reluctant about this film.

Elfelt also shot the first advertising film. There is a 1904 example which advertises bock beer for the Svendborg Brewery. Elfelt opened the “København Kinoptikon” movie theater in 1901. Although Elfelt was Denmark’s first pioneer of filmmaking, he considered film as secondary to his work as a photographer. Elfelt died on 18 February 1931.—WIkipedia

Ramin S. Khanjan​i

over 1 year ago

Profile picture for Fereydoun Hoveyda: http://mubi.com/cast_members/18851

Carlos Conceiç​ão

over 1 year ago

THE LAST TIME I SAW MACAO (http://mubi.com/films/the-last-time-i-saw-macao)

Official synopsis:

Thirty years later I’m on my way to Macao where I haven’t been since I was a child. I got an e-mail, in Lisbon, from Candy, a friend I hadn’t heard from in ages. She told me that she had been involved yet again with the wrong men and asked me to go to Macao where “strange and scary things” were happening. Tired, after a long flight, I’m approaching Macao aboard the jetfoil which will take me back to the happiest time in my life.

Trinta anos depois, estou a caminho de Macau, onde voltava desde criança. Recebi um e-mail, em Lisboa, da Candy, uma amiga da qual não sabia nada há anos. Ela contou-me que ela se tinha envolvido mais uma vez com os homens errados e pediu-me que fosse para Macau, onde “coisas estranhas e assustadoras” estavam a acontecer. Cansado, depois de um longo voo, chego a Macau a bordo do barco que me levará de volta ao tempo mais feliz da minha vida.

ruby stevens

over 1 year ago

virginia weidler

Virginia Anna Adeleide Weidler (March 21, 1927 – July 1, 1968) was an American child actress, popular in Hollywood films during the 1930s and 1940s.

Born in Eagle Rock, Los Angeles, California in 1927, Virginia Weidler made her first film appearance in 1933. Over the next few years, she was cast in minor roles for RKO and Paramount Pictures. Neither studio made more extensive use of her and when Paramount did not extend her contract, she was signed by MGM in 1938. Her first film for MGM was with their leading male star Mickey Rooney in Love Is a Headache (1938). The film was a success and Weidler was now cast in larger roles, most often as precocious tom-boys. She was one of the all-female cast of the 1939 film The Women, as Norma Shearer’s daughter.

Her next major success was The Philadelphia Story (1940) in which she played Dinah Lord, the witty younger sister of Tracy Lord (Katharine Hepburn). As a teenager she was less popular with audiences. After a string of box-office disappointments, her film career ended with the 1943 film Best Foot Forward. At her retirement by age 17, she had appeared in more than forty films, and had acted with some of the biggest stars of the day, including Clark Gable and Myrna Loy in Too Hot to Handle, Bette Davis in All This and Heaven Too and Judy Garland in Babes on Broadway.

On March 27, 1947, Weidler married Lionel Krisel. They had two sons, Ronnie and Gary. Her older brother, saxophonist George Weidler (01/11/1926 – 12/27/1989) was married to Doris Day from March 1946 to May 1949.

Weidler refused to be interviewed for the remainder of her life, living in private. She remained married to Krisel until her death on July 1, 1968 when she suffered a heart attack in Los Angeles at age 41. — wikipedia

Carlos Conceiç​ão

over 1 year ago

THE LAST TIME I SAW MACAO (http://mubi.com/films/the-last-time-i-saw-macao)

Small correction in synopsis/Pequena correcção na sinópse:

Trinta anos depois, estou a caminho de Macau, onde não voltava desde criança. Recebi um e-mail, em Lisboa, da Candy, uma amiga da qual não sabia nada há anos. Ela contou-me que se tinha envolvido uma vez mais com os homens errados e pediu-me que fosse para Macau, onde “coisas estranhas e assustadoras” estavam a acontecer. Cansado, depois de um longo voo, chego a Macau a bordo do barco que me levará de volta ao tempo mais feliz da minha vida.

Synopsis by: Blackmaria Produção.

Ramin S. Khanjan​i

over 1 year ago

Duplicate entries:

http://mubi.com/cast_members/290085
and
http://mubi.com/cast_members/358757

both refer to:
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0453956/

Mr. Arkadin

over 1 year ago

Missing cast/production info for The Seven-Ups (http://mubi.com/films/the-seven-ups):

DIRECTOR: Philip D’Antoni
EXECUTIVE PRODUCER: Kenneth Utt, Barry J. Weitz
PRODUCER: Philip D’Antoni, Gerald B. Greenberg
SCREENPLAY: Albert Ruben, Alexander Jacobs
CINEMATOGRAPHY/DP: Urs Furrer
Additional CAST: Bill Hickman
EDITOR: John C. Horger, Stephen A. Rotter
MUSIC: Don Ellis
SOUND: Don J. Bassman, Les Lazarowitz, Theodore Soderberg

DT

over 1 year ago

Give Deja Vu its alternative title of “Déjà Vu” as its subtitle.

Ramin S. Khanjan​i

over 1 year ago

Please correct the title to “Escape from the trap”

http://mubi.com/films/escape-from-he-trap

Domas

over 1 year ago

Experim​entoFil​m

over 1 year ago

Adelqui Migliar was a Director.

Experim​entoFil​m

over 1 year ago

Synopsis for State of Siege:
In Uruguay in the early 1970s, an official of the US Agency for International Development (a group used as a front for training foreign police in counterinsurgency methods) is kidnapped by a group of urban guerillas. Using his interrogation as a backdrop, the film explores the often brutal consequences of the struggle between Uruguay’s government and the leftist Tupamaro guerillas. -IMDb

Synopsis for She Killed in Ecstasy:
A young doctor kills himself after a medical committee terminates his research into human embryos, considering it too inhumane. His wife then seeks revenge on those who drove her husband to his death by luring each member of the committee into compromising situations and then killing them one by one. -IMDb

Synopsis for Fascination:
This erotic horror film, set in 1905, tells the story of a thief who seeks refuge in a castle owned by two women, Eva (Brigitte Lahaie) and Elizabeth (Franca Mai). The women are seductive and teasing, but turn out to be part of a vampiric cult of blood-drinking aristocrats. -IMDb

Synopsis for The Demoniacs:
A gang of pirates rape the two sole survivors of a ship wreck. The violated girls are rescued by the strange inhabitants of a supposedly haunted island, where they are granted supernatural powers to strike revenge against the pirates. -IMDb

DT

over 1 year ago

(Following on from a previous thread): let’s just be pragmatic – NOBODY refers to Ordet as “The Word”. If not to get rid of the English translation altogether, at least bump it to the subtitle position and (rightfully) have “Ordet” front and center.

Ale/M

over 1 year ago

The pic for “Il grande cocomero” (Archibugi) is taken from “Problemi di cuore”. Here the only right pictures I’ve found :

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Carlos Conceiç​ão

over 1 year ago

THE LAST TIME I SAW MACAO (http://mubi.com/films/the-last-time-i-saw-macao)

Please correct the errors in the published synopsis
Por favor corrigir os erros na sinópse publicada

Correct synopsis/Sinópse correcta:

Trinta anos depois, estou a caminho de Macau, onde não voltava desde criança. Recebi um e-mail, em Lisboa, da Candy, uma amiga da qual não sabia nada há anos. Ela contou-me que se tinha envolvido uma vez mais com os homens errados e pediu-me que fosse para Macau, onde “coisas estranhas e assustadoras” estavam a acontecer. Cansado, depois de um longo voo, chego a Macau a bordo do barco que me levará de volta ao tempo mais feliz da minha vida.

Synopsis by: Blackmaria Produção.

L.

over 1 year ago

http://mubi.com/films/hourglass is in b/w and the still is not from the film, here’s a better one

Thrift Store Junkie

over 1 year ago

Grigori Kromanov

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Bio:

Grigori Kromanov (8 March 1926 Tallinn – 18 July 1984 Lääne-Virumaa) was an Estonian theatre and film director. He directed some of the best known Estonian movies, including Viimne reliikvia (Estonian: The Last Relic) and “Hukkunud Alpinisti” hotell (Hotel “Fallen Alpinist”).

His 1976 film Brilliants for the Dictatorship of the Proletariat is based on the 1974 detective novel Diamonds for the Dictatorship of the Proletariat by Yulian Semyonov.—WIkipedia

Owen Sound

over 1 year ago

Franchot Tone

“Actors suffer from being half narcissistic and half self-critical.”

Franchot Tone was born into a well-to-do upstate New York family. Tone traveled the world with his parents and attended various schools, including The Hill School in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, from which he was dismissed “for being a subtle influence for disorder throughout the fall term.” He entered Cornell University, studying romance languages with an initial goal of eventually teaching in such. But he also joined Cornell’s drama club, becoming its president his senior year. The interest in theater would sow a seed soon to be germinated.

Tone had no interest in the family electro-chemical business. He decided to become a serious actor. He meant business by joining a theater stock company in the city of Buffalo, earning only $15 a week. He toiled with dedication, playing bit roles and educating himself in the theater business. He moved to Greenwich Village and auditioned for the New Playwrights’ Theater, making his Broadway debut in 1929 with Katharine Cornell in “The Age of Innocence”. Tone portrayed Curly in the flop Broadway production of “Green Grow the Lilacs” which would later be developed into the musical “Oklahoma!”. He later discovered the Group Theatre in New York formed by Lee Strasberg and Harold Clurman. This was the first functional school for “Method” acting in America, followed later by The Actors Studio, also under Strasberg. In late September of 1931 the theater presented its first production, “The House of Connelly”, with Tone and Morris Carnovsky in the leading roles. Tone appeared in “Big Night” and later appeared in “Success Story”, after which Strasberg proclaimed him as the best actor in the company. His performance in “Success Story” also prompted a contract offer from MGM. He moved to Hollywood in November 1932, although his aspirations as an actor did not include becoming a Hollywood star.

His first screen appearance was under the Paramount banner, not MGM, in The Wiser Sex (1932) starring Claudette Colbert. The Paramount brass did not see the potential, a telling sign of the chasm between Hollywood acting and that of the theater. Tone, however, was definitely on the “A” List ladder, His first MGM film, Today We Live (1933) co-starred the ambitious Joan Crawford. Here his woes with Hollywood actresses began in earnest. He and Crawford became a couple, and MGM could see the potential for better box office by pairing them in several movies. Tone worked through 1933 with other leading ladies, such as Loretta Young, Miriam Hopkins and Jean Harlow, before he worked again with Crawford. However, he was already being saddled with “the other man” roles. In his next movie with Crawford, Dancing Lady (1933), he was competing with Clark Gable. By their next movie together, Sadie McKee (1934), Tone was the leading man but in forthcoming outings with Crawford he would have other film rivals and his characters tended to be less dynamic than hers.

He was loaned to Warner Bros. for Dangerous (1935) with ‘Bette Davis’. Davis also became romantically interested in him, and her incipient rivalry with Crawford made her all the more incensed with Crawford on finding out that she was engaged to Tone. Davis was envious and ashamed of her advances toward Tone, and the incident is believed by many sources to be the start of the famous warfare between Crawford and Davis that lasted to their dying days. Tone and Crawford did marry in late 1935, but the chemistry did not gel. Tone was an Eastern blueblood who shunned the artificial Hollywood lifestyle, while the unsophisticated Crawford could not get enough of it, and publicity. Those differences and Crawford’s bigger star power became glaringly obvious when the media labeled him “Mr. Joan Crawford”. Tone’s film career did not match Crawford’s phenomenal rise, and he was still dedicated to substantial support of Group Theatre productions. The marriage goals and the money diverged sharply; they divorced in March of 1939.

Tone was most definitely becoming a matinée idol name. In 1935 he had two big hits, proving his wide range and depth as an actor. His whimsical demeanor lent well to comedic roles, which is why his wisecracking Lt. Forsythe in The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935) rang true. He also had considerable dramatic power, as seen in the second of these movies, the much anticipated Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) with his former co-star Gable. He, Gable and co-star Charles Laughton all received Oscar nominations for best actor. This was a first, and certainly an embarrassment which the Academy sought to remedy by introducing Best Supporting Actor and Actress Oscars the next year. Though Tone had other substantial roles through that decade, he seemed ready for a break with his film career. He suddenly returned to Broadway, and was able to thumb his nose at Hollywood due to the great success of his 1940 role as a newspaperman in Ernest Hemingway’s “The Fifth Column”. Unfortunately for him, MGM pointed out that he was still under contract to them, so he had to return.

Tone had stimulating enough roles while with MGM until 1944, particularly the World War II adventure Five Graves to Cairo (1943) which Cary Grant turned down because he didn’t want to spend the summer in the Arizona desert, where it was being shot. Thereafter Tone worked to beat Hollywood at its own game. He freelanced at other studios and concentrated on parts that would expand his talents. He started working towards that goal with Universal’s critically successful Phantom Lady (1944), in which he played a psychotic killer. He also began producing films that he felt would be challenging and successful. One of his best efforts in this capacity was the psychological B noir The Man on the Eiffel Tower (1949) as star and producer, with his great friend Burgess Meredith as director. However, his success as an actor and producer didn’t extend to his personal life, and he still couldn’t get past his weakness for marrying Hollywood starlets. By 1948 he divorced his second wife, Crawford rebound Jean Wallace. Between 1950 and 1952 he was embroiled in the most foolish act of his career: his involvement with actress-turned-prostitute Barbara Payton. Just about everyone in Hollywood warned him against getting involved with Payton, including ex-wife Crawford. He failed to heed those warnings, however, and soon married her. The marriage only lasted a few weeks, and he paid a pretty heavy price: a hospital stay because of some fairly serious injuries (broken cheekbone and nose and a concussion) that required surgery after he was attacked and beaten by one of Payton’s most possessive boyfriends, brutish actor Tom Neal. The uproar over this assault ended Neal’s acting career.

Tone’s distancing himself from Hollywood continued into the 1950s, proving that dedicated stage acting and Hollywood usually did not mix. However, his need to adapt and mold the acting profession continued unabated. He saw the great potential of TV to provide both a live and economically filmed (the new videotape format) spectrum of stage plays. For a decade he was heavily involved in the medium and contributed over 30 performances in a number of prestigious TV playhouse productions. He didn’t forget Broadway, though. In 1957 he scored a triumph in Eugene O’Neill’s “A Moon For The Misbegotten”, and even his personal life brightened considerably. His last wife was much more amenable to being a helpmate. Dolores Dorn helped with his ambitious production of “Uncle Vanya” both Off-Broadway and in a lukewarm film version in 1958. When the more formal playhouse programs were replaced by TV drama story hours, Tone was again an enthusiastic contributor. He also worked in episodic TV from the late 1950s, notably a turn in a fondly remembered episode of the classic “The Twilight Zone” (1959).

He did not give up on the silver screen in his last decade. He turned in a memorable performance as the president in Advise & Consent (1962), directed by Otto Preminger. Though he had planned on retiring from acting at the beginning of the ’60s, he in fact was working into the year of his death. Along with co-buying Theater Four in New York to launch new plays, he planned another personal multi-tasking (starring in and directing) film effort of the life of artist Auguste Renoir, but that was not to be. In reality, the title of his last film before his passing was as prophetic for him is for all of humanity – Nobody Runs Forever (1968). — IMDb

Ben 94

over 1 year ago

KARINE VANASSE
http://mubi.com/cast_members/21821
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MYRIAM VERREAULT
http://mubi.com/cast_members/68138
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HENRY BERNADET
http://mubi.com/cast_members/68139
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Ale/M

over 1 year ago

Paola Tiziana Crociani (La Bella Vita) is Paola Tiziana CRUCIANI

Picture for “Tre Colonne In Cronaca”

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Thrift Store Junkie

over 1 year ago

Adriaan Ditvoorst

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Bio:

Adriaan Ditvoorst (23 January 1940 – 18 October 1987) was a Dutch film director and screenwriter. He directed nine films between 1965 and 1984. His 1967 film Paranoia was entered into the 17th Berlin International Film Festival.—Wikipedia

J&K

over 1 year ago

Andre De Toth quote:

[On filmmaking] “I’ll try to undress in front of you, to reveal the love of my life, my addiction to making images, creating people who come to life on the screen—a screen of any size in any format. I’ll tell the truth as I see it on celluloid or in bronze.”

source

J&K

over 1 year ago

Phil Karlson quote:

“Not matter what I did in the smaller studios, they thought it was fantastic, because nobody could make pictures as fast as I could at that time, and get some quality into it by giving it a little screwier camera angle or something.”

source