MUBI brings you a great new film every day.  Start your 7-day free trial today!
All Topics  »

The Auteurs Film & Cast Member Database

Scout Tafoya

almost 3 years ago

Alex Heim is actually spelled Alex Heim

Alexandra Malorino is spelled Alexandra Maiorino

Anne St. Anne

almost 3 years ago

still suggestions for Eat The Rich:

Anne St. Anne

almost 3 years ago

[accidental duplicate!]

Anne St. Anne

almost 3 years ago

[accidental duplicate!]

Anne St. Anne

almost 3 years ago

Eeeep, sorry!

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

A few minor errors which need to be corrected.

Zeka Laplaine Bio
“I don’t think you get the message over nay better if you dress your film up to be really didactic! I am a great believer in using frivolity to say deep things.”

nay should be any.

Double entries:

Togo Mizrahi
Togo Mizrahi

Ahmed Diaeddin
Ahmed Diaeddin

Tewfik Saleh
Tewfik Saleh

Polyglo​t

almost 3 years ago

Amy Stiller

Bio:
Amy Stiller (born August 9, 1961) is an American actress. She is a stand up comedian, in New York City, and also a Bikram Yoga instructor.

She was born in New York City, New York, the daughter of the comedy duo Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara (Stiller and Meara), and the older sister of actor Ben Stiller. Stiller is married to voice actor Rodger Bumpass, who is known for his portrayal of Squidward Tentacles in the Nickelodeon cartoon SpongeBob SquarePants. -Wikipedia

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

Bio

Aly Badrakhan

Badrakhan was born in Cairo in 1946. He is the son of the acclaimed Egyptian director Ahmed Badrakhan.

He is a first class filmmaker in his own right and his films are noted for their complex narrative framework and socio political characters.

Badrakhan has participated on many film festival juries in Egypt and also at international festivals. He has directed many notable feature films, including: Kharnak, Shafika and Metwali and the Hunger. He has also directed several documentaries. He is a producer and has worked on many different films such as The Curse (1982) and Dream Girl (1983). He has supervised the production of several feature films and children’s films at the National Center for Cinema, Ministry of Culture.

Badrakhan has won numerous awards for his films, including:
Won several awards for Kharnak in 1975, including: first prize for the output from the Ministry of Culture. He also won the State Award for Best Film with Shafika and Metwali in 1979. In 2004 he was awarded the State Award for excellence in the arts of the Supreme Council of Culture. – translated from Egyptian Figures

Polyglo​t

almost 3 years ago

Chris Elliott

Quote:
I’m not a competitive person.

Bio:
Christopher Nash “Chris” Elliott (born May 31, 1960) is an American actor, comedian and writer. He is best known for his comedic sketches on Late Night with David Letterman, starring in the cult comedy series Get a Life and for his recurring role as Peter MacDougall on Everybody Loves Raymond. He is also known for appearing in movies such as Cabin Boy, There’s Something About Mary, Scary Movie 2 and Groundhog Day. Elliott currently stars in the Adult Swim series Eagleheart. -Wikipedia

Polyglo​t

almost 3 years ago

Catherine O’Hara

Quote:
I never went to the prom or anything. I got asked by a couple of weird guys, but no one I wanted to show up at a formal with. Mostly I thought about being an actress. I wasn’t conscious of wanting to be a comic actress. I wasn’t really funny or anything, and I didn’t think about it. It wasn’t supposed to be ladylike for a girl to joke. To this day, I’ve found that it doesn’t matter what a guy looks like if he’s really funny. His sense of humor makes him attractive. On the other hand, you don’t hear men saying, “No she’s not pretty, but is she ever funny!”

Bio:
Catherine Anne O’Hara (born March 4, 1954) is a Canadian-American actress and comedienne. She is well known for her comedy work on SCTV, and her roles in the films After Hours, Beetlejuice, Home Alone, and The Nightmare Before Christmas, and also in the mockumentary films written and directed by Christopher Guest including Waiting for Guffman, Best in Show, A Mighty Wind, and For Your Consideration.

O’Hara was born in Toronto, Ontario, in a large Irish family, and was raised Roman Catholic. She attended Burnhamthorpe Collegiate Institute, where she first met Robin Duke, who went on to her own comedy career. Catherine started her comedy career in 1974 as a cast member of The Second City in her native Toronto. She was an understudy for Gilda Radner until she left for Saturday Night Live. Two years later, this theatre troupe created the sketch comedy show SCTV, for which O’Hara became a regular performer. Her memorable characterizations on the show included Las Vegas scorcher Lola Heatherton, buzzer-happy game show contestant Margaret Meehan, raunchy nightclub comedian Dusty Towne, soap opera seductress Sue Ellen and stage actress Sue Bopper Simpson.

In the late 1970s, O’Hara also provided voice-overs for a number of cartoons, which would continue throughout her career. During a short time in the early 80s when SCTV was in between network deals, she was hired to replace Ann Risley when Saturday Night Live was being retooled in 1981. However, she quit the show without ever appearing on-air, choosing to go back to SCTV when the show signed on with NBC. Her SNL position was then given to fellow Canadian Robin Duke, who had also replaced O’Hara for a season on SCTV.

O’Hara has also appeared in successful films in the 1980s and the 1990s including After Hours, Beetlejuice, Home Alone, and The Nightmare Before Christmas. From 1997 to 2006, she appeared in the Christopher Guest mockumentary films Waiting for Guffman, Best in Show, A Mighty Wind, and For Your Consideration, displaying her improvisational skills. On June 9, 2007, O’Hara was inducted into Canada’s Walk of Fame. In May 2008, it was announced that she has signed on to star in the upcoming ABC dramedy Good Behavior. On February 28, 2010, she spoke at the Closing Ceremonies of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. -Wikipedia

Polyglo​t

almost 3 years ago

Lance Henriksen

Quote:
I’ve broken bones doing stunts, I’ve always been one to have a go. But after a while I realized that there are some things not worth doing. Stunt men pay a price, some of them can hardly walk when they’re older. John Woo set me on fire twice for Hard Target (1993). It burnt my ears! But I would’ve done anything for John Woo.

Bio:
An intense, versatile actor as adept at playing clean-cut FBI agents as he is psychotic motorcycle-gang leaders, who can go from portraying soulless, murderous vampires to burned-out, world-weary homicide detectives, Lance Henriksen has starred in a variety of films that have allowed him to stretch his talents just about as far as an actor could possibly hope. He played “Awful Knoffel” in the TNT original movie Evel Knievel (2004) (TV), directed by John Badham and executive produced by Mel Gibson. Henriksen portrayed “Awful Knoffel” in this project based on the life of the famed daredevil, played by George Eads. Henriksen starred for three seasons (1996-1999) on “Millennium” (1996/I), Fox-TV’s critically acclaimed series created by Chris Carter (“The X-Files” (1993)). His performance as Frank Black, a retired FBI agent who has the ability to get inside the minds of killers, landed him three consecutive Golden Globe nominations for “Best Performance by a Lead Actor in a Drama Series” and a People’s Choice Award nomination for “Favorite New TV Male Star”.

Born in New York, Henriksen studied at the Actors Studio and began his career off-Broadway in Eugene O’Neill’s “Three Plays of the Sea.” One of his first film appearances was as an FBI agent in Sidney Lumet’s Dog Day Afternoon (1975), followed by parts in Lumet’s Network (1976) and Prince of the City (1981). He then appeared in Steven Spielberg’s Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) with Richard Dreyfuss and François Truffaut, Damien: Omen II (1978) and in Philip Kaufman’s The Right Stuff (1983), in which he played Mercury astronaut Capt. Wally Schirra.

James Cameron cast Henriksen in his first directorial effort, Piranha Part Two: The Spawning (1981), then used him again in The Terminator (1984) and as the android Bishop in the sci-fi classic Aliens (1986). Sam Raimi cast Henriksen as an outrageously garbed gunfighter in his quirky western The Quick and the Dead (1995). Henriksen has also appeared in what has developed into a cult classic: Kathryn Bigelow’s Near Dark (1987), in which he plays the head of a clan of murderous redneck vampires. He was nominated for a Golden Satellite Award for his portrayal of Abraham Lincoln in the TNT original film The Day Lincoln Was Shot (1998) (TV).

In addition to his abilities as an actor, Henriksen is an accomplished painter and potter. His talent as a ceramist has enabled him to create some of the most unusual ceramic artworks available on the art market today. He resides in Southern California with his wife Jane and their five-year-old daughter Sage. (IMDb)

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Kamal El Shiekh, Director, Egypt

The director Kamel al-Sheikh was one of the most popular Egyptian filmmakers in the fifties and early sixties He was heavily influenced by American film director Alfred Hitchcock, and was known for his interest in detective films that largely depended on complex storylines.

Kamal el-Sheikh was born on the 5th of February 1919 in the popular district of Helwan and completed his secondary education and obtained a baccalaureate degree in 1937. In this period he began his passion for cinema and begun to search for a way to fulfil his dream of becoming a filmmaker. He sent a letter to Mohammad Karim accompanied by a photograph of him asking him where he could find him a job for one of his films.Karim did not reply to Kamal’s letter but still he was undeterred and eventually managed to work his way into the film industry by becoming an assisatnt editor to Niazi Mostafa. He continued to work as an editor throughout the 1940’s working with Youssef Wahby and Anwar Wagdi.

In1952 Kamal al-Sheikh directed his first feature, House No. 13 starring Emad Hamdi and Faten Hamama. Kamal forged a fresh direction in new Egyptian cinema breaking from the tradition of musicals and melodrama. His films were fresh edgy film noirs concentrating on criminals running from the law featuring shady characters and fallen women. He also used flashbacks, complex lighting setups and innovative dolly shots previously unused in Egyptian cinema. After the success of House No. 13 critics hailed Kamal al-Sheikh as the “Egyptian Alfred Hitchcock” a title he would reject throughout his life.

Over the following decade Kamal became one of the most influentisl directors working in Egyptian cinema and enjoyed great success with films such as Lady of the Castle (1959), Angel and the Devil, (1960) and Chased By the Dogs (1962) The latter film was adapted from a novel by the reknowned author Naguib Mahfouz who would collaborate with him many times throughout his career.

Kamal was married to Ms. Amira Salem and she became his confidant and editor for most of films alongside his brother Saeed Shiekh. During the eighties Kamal’s work became less frequent and he made his last feature in 1987. He died on January 2, 2004. – translated from Al Riyadh

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Ibrahim El-Batout, Director, Egypt

QUOTE
Having reflected on my life through a movie script I wrote I got to know myself better and began to understand why I chose this path in life.

BIO
Ibrahim El-Batout, who was born on the 20th of September, 1963 in Portsaid, is a graduate of the American University in Cairo in 1985, majoring in Physics. El Batout’s infatuation with the camera started in the Video Cairo Production House, an agency that provides facilities for foreign TV-stations. There, he worked as a sound engineer. Shortly after, El Batout began to experiment with filmmaking and learned about the skills required of cameramen, editors and directors. Later, he worked for a year at a British television station called TV-Am, located in Cyprus. Since then, he has worked as a director, producer and cameraman, capturing stories mainly about human loss, suffering, and displacement since 1987, and has also directed numerous documentaries for international TV channels, such as ZDF (Germany), TBS (Japan) and ARTE (France).

El Batout documentary work has received numerous international awards, such as : the Axel Springer Award in Germany (1994 and 2000) and the Direct Marketing Association’s coveted ECHO award (1996).

Towards the beginning of 2004, El Batout stepped into the world of fiction to make the long feature film ‘Ithaki’ (2005). His second feature film ‘Ein Shams’ (Eye of the Sun) (2008) has won the Golden Bull, the top prize at the 54th Taormina Film Festival, 2008.

In 2010, El Batout has completed his third feature film Hawi (the juggler), which is in its Post Production stage. Before Hawi is even completed, it has already attracted the attention of the Hubert Bals Fund, Netherlands, who awarded the film a Post Production Fund. The film will premiere in the Netherlands at the Rotterdam International Film Festival January/February 2011. – Ibrahim Elbatout.com

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Hala Khalil, Director, Egypt

BIO
HALA KHALIL was born in 1967 in Egypt and graduated in directing from the Cairo Academy in 1992. Her award-winning short filmsincludeThe Kite, and she made her feature directing debut with The Best of Times (2004), which won awards from the Arab Film Festival, Rotterdam, the Rabat Film Festival and the Egyptian Film Critics’ Association. – Dubai Film Fest

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Mohamed Khan, Director, Egypt

BIO
Born on October 26, 1942, He completed his high school in Egypt, then traveled to England where studied at the London School of Film Technique (now known as The London Int. Film School) between 1962 and 1963. He directed several 8mms. He came back to Egypt in 1963 and worked at script department of the General Egyptian FIlm company. Worked in Lebanon between 1964 and 1966 as an assistant director, then moved to England where he wrote his book “An Introduction to the Egyptian Cinema”, Published in London by Informatics in 1969. Edited another Book entitled “Outline of Czechoslovakian Cinema”, which was also published in London by Informatics in 1971.

He has one daughter, Nadine, and one son, Hassan.

According to the book that has been issued in December 2007 in the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Khan’s Ahlam Hind we Kamilia (1988) is one of the 100 landmarks in the history of the Cinema of Egypt. 1963 and working all the way till now, the man still does not have the Egyptian nationality.

Khan has accomplished a couple of “Art Pieces” that can hardly be accomplished again. For instance, in this very film, El Harrif, he convince one of the most famous and successful comedians of all times in the Arab World, Adel Emam, to star in this very darkly viewed story. It is said that Adel Emam himself does not like this film now, but for me it is still considered to be one of the Master pieces in the history of Egyptian Cinema and it shows how deep can Emam goes in acting if only he can stop working on those trivial scripts that he got from time to time and earn him success among the mainstream cinema viewers in the Arab World. But may be the man chose his way, but for Khan, we can say that he has chosen the more Difficult way, the way via which he had always to produce meticulously crafted movies, working on stories – mainly that he wrote – with great script writers, among which is Beshir El Deek, to produce movies that simply touch the inner soul of any Egyptian who may view them after years and years of their production.- Wikipedia

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Atef Hetata, Director, Egypt

QUOTE
I definitely believe that the best way to avoid fundamentalism is to be as open as possible and to resolve the fundamental problems of our society.

BIO
Atef Hetata is an extremely promising young Egyptian director. He was born on December 10, 1965 in New York. At the age of eighteen he won the Cairo University Literary prize for a collection of short stories. Four years later (1988) he graduated from the Faculty of Engineering (Department of Communications) with honors. During the years 1989 to 1993, he worked as an assistant director for a number of filmmakers, including the great Youssef Chahine (whose films The Land and Destiny have shown in earlier Festivals). He also worked on Spike Lee’s Malcom X. He has written and directed three short films: Salut Barbès (Paris 1989), Violin (Cairo 1990), and The Bride of the Nile (Cairo 1993). The last two films earned him a number of international awards, including Best Fiction Film at the Bilboa Film Festival and the Grand Prix du Jury at the Montpellier Film Festival and. His prize money from Montpellier enabled him to begin work on The Closed Doors, and Youssef Chahine also provided financial support (not surprising, given Chahine’s strong anti-fundamentalist perspective). The Closed Doors has gone on to win a number of awards at film festivals, including Venice, Cannes, Alexandria, Carthage, and the Biannale of Arab Film in Paris. – Library Cornell

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Mohamed Karim, Director, Egypt

(Mohamed Karim has just one “m”. On his page it is spelt with two.)

BIO
Mohamed Karim was born on 8 December 1886 in Abdeen in Cairo. He remembers vividly the first time he went to the cinematograph as a child, and asked his elder brother to take him there again, because he had been absolutely fascinated by it. It was this second time that “determined [his] future and led [him] along the path he took” (Ali, p. 34). Since that time “I started to imagine myself in the place of the actors I see on screen” (Ali, p. 36).

One September day in 1917 his Italian friend and neighbour told him that the Banco di Roma had established an Italian production company in Alexandria called The Italian Cinematographic Society (SITCIA). This, the first production company in Egypt, would produce films adapted from The Thousand and One Nights. Karim wrote to it, attaching 36 of his photos in several positions imitating famous actors. However, he did not succeed in his attempt for a very simple reason: he was not fluent in either Italian or French. But Karim did not give up. He immediately started learning Italian and practising it with his friends. Six months later he sent another letter to the company, this time attaching 86 new photos of himself. As a result, he received a letter from the company asking him to come to Alexandria for a screen test.

Thus it was in Alexandria that Mohamed Karim started his career.

On Saturday 20 July 1918 Karim stood in front of the camera for the first time to play the role of an officer in The Honour of the Bedouin (Charaf el Badawî). Later, he also played a small role in The Deadly Flowers (el Azhâr el Momîta). And so the man famous for being a great director started his cinema career as an actor; in fact, the first Egyptian actor in the entire history of Egyptian cinema. However no sooner had they finished the film than he realised that this was not what he desired. He decided to travel to Europe to seek the opportunity that matched his abilities and skills.

He travelled to Italy in 1920, where he played small roles in the Italian films Camello’s Revenge and Messaline. He also travelled to Germany where he took part in some German films and studied at UFA Studios. It was also there that he shifted to directing and decided to make that his career.

He returned to Egypt on 28 August 1926 and applied to Sherket Misr Lil Tamthîl we el Cinema (The Egyptian Company for Acting and Cinema) where he was asked to direct a short film about the zoo. He started the film on 15 June 1927 in which the director of photography was Hassan Mourad. Talaat Harb liked it and hired Karim in the company.

However, when he did not find a chance to fulfil his dream in directing a feature film in the company, he suggested to his childhood friend Youssef Wahbi that he direct Zeinab, his first film, starring Bahiga Hafez.

He formed a duet with Mohamed Abdel Wahab, who never acted in a film unless Karim was the director. Abdel Wahab acted in seven films all of which were directed by Karim. Karim was the first to introduce the nine year old Faten Hamama to the screen, to introduce coloured scenes in I am not an Angel (Lasto malâkn), to make a sound film, The Elite (Awlâd el dhâwat), and to be first director of the Higher Institute of Cinema in 1959. – Alex Cinema

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Togo Mizrahi, Director, Egypt

BIO
Togo Mizrahi is not only one of the founding fathers of Alexandrian cinema in the thirties, but he also contributed greatly to Egyptian cinema as a whole. Equally important is that the forceful presence and the total integration of Togo Mizrahi, an Italian Jew, into the Alexandrian scene attest to the tolerance and co-existence of the cosmopolitan Alexandria of his time, where diverse ethnic and religious groups lived in harmony. This cosmopolitan spirit seems to have infiltrated into Mizrahi’s consciousness for it was to figure in a number of his films, such as Seven o’clock and The Two Delegates.

Mizrahi was born on 2 June 1901 to an Italian family that lived in Alexandria. After receiving his education in Alexandrian schools and earning a diploma in commerce, he left for Italy in 1921 to continue his studies. He then went to France but eventually came back to Alexandria in 1928 with a Ph D in economics.

On his return, he started his career in cinema by issuing a newsreel in Alexandria. He then founded The Egyptian Films Company and turned to feature films.

In his first film The Abyss (el Hâwiyah) in 1930, Mizrahi proved to be a man of many talents for he produced, directed, edited, acted, designed the set and wrote the script. This film was made in Bacos Studio, a cinema theatre which Mizrahi had bought and converted into a studio with a plateau, the necessary equipments and actors’ rooms. It was in this studio that he made all his Alexandrian films until he moved the premises of his company to Cairo in 1939. The film premiered in Alexandria and was next shown in Cairo on 2 February 1931, but under a new name, Cocaine (el kokaïn).

Togo chose to act under the pseudonym of Ahmed el Meshriqi, and his brother, who acted in this film, used the pseudonym Abdel Aziz el Meshriqi.

Mizrahi, who was in the habit of discovering new actors, presented in this film Shalom, a Jewish actor, who became a famous comedian in Egyptian cinema. Shalom was to work with him in a number of films such as 5001(khamsat âlaf wa wâhid)in 1932,Shalom the Dragoman (Shalom el tourgmân) in 1935, Much Wealth is a Nuisance (el ‘Izz bahdalah) in 1937, and Shalom the Athlete (Shalom el riyâdî) in 1937.

In the following year, Mizrahi directed his second feature film 5001(khamsat âlaf wa wâhid)and in 1935, he directed his first sound film Children of Egypt (Awlâd Misr).

After his first three films Cocaine (el kokaïn), 5001 (khamsat âlaf wa wâhid), and Sons of Egypt (Awlâd Misr), which basically tackled social issues, he was to shift to comedy. He started with The Two Delegates (el Mandoubân) in 1934, a comic film starring the most famous duet of the Egyptian theatre at the time, Fawzi and Ehsane el Gazayerly . Mizrahi was to capitalize on the success of that film by teaming up with that successful duet in other films which he also acted in, Dr. Farahat (el Doktor Farhât) in 1935 and The Sailor (el bahhâr)in 1935.

After his successful experience with the Gazaerlis, he worked with Ali el Kassar, another famous comedian of the time. Together, they made nine successful films: One Hundred Thousand Pounds (Mit alf guinih) in 1936, The Guard of the Barracks (Khafir el darak) in 1936, Seven o’clock (el Sâ‘ah Sab‘ah) in 1937, The Telegram (el Telegraf) in 1938, Osman and Ali (‘Othman wa ‘Ali) in 1939, The Thousand and One Nights (Alf Lailah wa Lailah) in 1941, Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves (‘Ali Bâbâ wa-l-arba’in harâmi) in 1942,and Nour Eddine and the Three Sailors (Nour Eddine wa-l-bahhârah el thalâthah)in 1944. Interestingly enough, the last three movies were inspired by folktales and Arabic heritage. The spectators greatly enjoyed the hilarious stories of the unlucky Nubian, played by Ali el Kassar, not only because of his naiveté and the absurd situations he got into, but also because of his ethnic clothes and strong Nubian accent.

One of Mizrahi’s most notable contributions to Egyptian cinema was that he turned Laila Mourad, the famous Egyptian singer and actress, into a legendary figure by presenting her in a new light. Together they made five films which he produced and directed: A Rainy Night (Laylah moumtirah) in 1939, Laila from the Countryside (Layla bint el rif) in 1941, Laila the School Girl (Layla bint el madâris) in 1941, Laila (1942), and Laila in the Dark (Layla fi-l-zalâm) in 1944.

Mizrahi had another successful experience with Greek cinema for he produced and directed four Greek-speaking films which were a success in Greek cinema theatres. It was customary for Greek theatrical troupes to finish off their season with a grand tour to different countries where they would perform their plays before the Greek communities. The largest and most important Greek community was the one in Egypt. That is why most of the Greek theatrical troupes presented their plays in Alexandria, Cairo, Port Said and Ismailia from the turn of the twentieth century till the fifties.

When Mizrahi met the Kaltos Sisters Troupe in 1937, while they were performing in Egypt, he approached them with a translated script of a film he had already directed, Dr. Farahat, which he proposed to produce and direct for the troupe. The troupe immediately agreed to his proposal and the film was made and shown in Greece under the title of Doctor Epaminondas. The success of the film seems to have triggered competition for in 1938, the owner of the largest Greek troupe, Sofia Fembo, approached Mizrahi with a script, which he was to direct and produce for her, and in the same year he was to direct and produce another Greek film for the Kaltos Sisters Troupe. Finally, in 1943, he directed and produced The Sailor for the Kaltos Sisters, a film which he had already directed in 1935.

Another important film in Togo’s career is Sallama (Sallâmah) in 1945, a historical film set in the Umayyad times, starring the most famous Egyptian singer Oum Kalthoum.

Towards the end of his career, he produced films that were directed by young promising Egyptian directors: The Son of the Blacksmith (Ibn el haddâd)in 1944, Divine Providence (Yadu Allah) in 1946 and The Great Artist (el Fannân el ’azîm) in 1945 by Youssef Wahbi, Mohamed Ali Street (Shâri’ Mouhammad ‘Ali) in 1944 and Beauty Queen (Malikat el gamâl) in 1946 by Niazi Mustafa, and Appearances el Mazâhir in 1945 and Love Train (Express el houbb) in 1946 by Hussein Fawzi.

In 1939, with the outbreak of World War II, Mizrahi moved to a studio in Cairo, on 4, Hosni Street, Guiza, while retaining his old one in Bacos. Until the studios were sequestrated then liquidated in the 1960s, the letterhead of the The Egyptian Films Company continued to carry the two addresses: Studios Bacos and Studios Guiza. Mizrahi himself left Egypt for good in 1948, settling in Rome until his death in 1986.

The studios went on functioning under the direction of his nephew Alfredo, who operated from Cairo, until the The Egyptian Films Company was liquidated in 1966. Thus ended the Mizrahi saga in Egypt.

While he worked at a reduced rate in the cinema in Rome, due to health problems, Mizrahi continued to show a keen interest in what was happening in Egypt. He arranged for a subscription to the Egyptian cinema magazines El Messawar and El Kawakeb, although money and transfer arrangements had become complicated during the 1960s. Wanting a little bit of Egypt in Rome, he asked Georges Behna for some of his old posters and photographs with which to decorate his office, and though all material had had to be handed over to the liquidator of the Egyptian Films Company, Georges did manage to find some in his stores to send to his friend. Mizrahi also followed Omar Sharif’s rise to international stardom, and noted that he was now acting with Sophia Loren. His personal letterhead carried, in addition to his Rome address, his Egyptian one at Guiza, complete with telephone number. – Aex Cinema

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Niazi Mostafa, Director, Egypt

BIO
Niazi Mostafa was born on November 11 (November) 1911 in Asyut, the son of a Sudanese potter and a Turkish mother. After he finished secondary school in Cairo Mostafa worked for a London based film magazine, and after travelled to Germany to study film at the Institute of Munich.

Niazi returned to Egypt and became the first person to receive the certificate of academic study in filmmaking. He soon became the head of editing of a new film sudio, Film Misr. Soon he begun making his own films and directed a documentary film, Bank of Egypt. Following the success of this movie he made ​​films, several documentaries and propaganda pieces. Many notable directors first trained with Mostafa such as his brother Jalal Mustafa, Hassan Al Imam, Salah Abu Seif, Kamal al-Sheikh, Mohammed Jawad, and Ibrahim Amara.

In 1937 Mostafa directed his first feature film, Safety in he Best starring Naguib al-Rihani and Si Omar. Following this sucess he made many features such as Factory Wives (1941), A Glass and a Cigarette (1955) and The Secret of the Magic Hat (1959). Mostafa was an extremely versatile director and worked in all genres, comedies, historical epics, musicals and family films. In 1986 Mostafa was savagely murdered. The crime was never solved and remains a mystery until now.- Cinema Hair (part translated)

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Tahani Rached, Director, Egypt, Canada

QUOTE
I don’t try to have distance. What I try to do is to create a relationship, so the film is done with the people and with their agreement. I don’t need distance.

BIO
Born in Egypt, Tahani Rached settled in Quebec in 1966. After attending Montreal’s École des Beaux-Arts, she was involved in community action until she made her first film, POUR FAIRE CHANGEMENT (1972), a documentary produced by Le Vidéographe, which set the tone for all her future work. In 1979, her first feature film, LES VOLEURS DE JOBS, revealed her distinctive view of the world. A documentary on immigration, it demonstrated her ability to capture reality. This was followed by a series of six half-hour documentaries for Radio-Quebec on Quebec’s Arab community.

As a NFB staff filmmaker from 1980 to 2004, she tackled sensitive topics: war in BEIRUT! NOT ENOUGH DEATH TO GO ROUND (1983); the resourcefulness of the disadvantaged, through the songs in AU CHIC RESTO POP (1990); and a doctor’s battle against AIDS in DOCTORS WITH HEART (1993). FOUR WOMEN OF EGYPT (1997) features four women who couldn’t be more different but who are nevertheless united in their search for meaning and tolerance through 50 years of contemporary Egyptian history. In EMERGENCY! A CRITICAL SITUATION (1999), an entire emergency room team speaks about their difficult work, while in FOR A SONG (2001), it is extracurricular activities such as singing in a choir that are found to restore social ties, lift the soul and create beauty. SORAIDA, A WOMAN OF PALESTINE (2004) captures the reflections, concerns and imagination of a Palestinian woman, her family and her neighborhood, the soul of a nation that is doing its best to survive the war and occupation. In 2006 she shot her most ambitious film EL-BANATE DOL (THESE GIRLS), in Egypt. (April 2007) – Women Make Cinema

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Samir Seif, Director, Egypt

BIO
Samir Seif graduated from the Higher Institute of Cinema in June 1969, and still continues to work at the institute today. He worked as an assistant with directors such as Shadi Abdel Salam on the Eloquent Peasant. He belongs to a generation of filmmakers which include Mohamed Khan, Aly Badrakhan and Khairy Beshara. Seif then worked as an assistant director for the great Youssef Chahine on his film The People and the Nile.

In 1972 Seif directed his first short film about Professor Yusuf Idris which was produced by Egyptian state television. In 1975 he made his feature debut with Circle of Revenge and followed this succes with Ota Ala Nar (1977), The Ghoul (1983), Tiger and the Female (1987). Seif is best known for the films he made in collaboration with the actor Adel Iman. – Arab TV Film School (Translated from)

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Tewfik Salah, Director, Egypt

BIO
In a career in cinema of more than forty years, Tawfik Saleh has made just seven feature films. Al-Mutamarridun (The Rebels, 1967) was banned for politi­cal reasons, and his last two films, al-Makhdu’un (The Dupes, 1972) and al­Ayyam al-Tawila (The Long Days, 1980), made in Syria and Iraq, have never been shown in Egypt.

In Saleh’s last year at university, Tawfik al-Hakim’s play, Russassa fil-Qalb (A Bullet in the Heart) was presented at the French Friendship Club in Alexandria. Saleh was asked to direct it just three days before its presentation. The French Cultural Attaché was impressed by Saleh’s direction and sent him to study theater in Paris for a year.

Saleh returned to Egypt soon after the Free Officers’ revolution, having actually studied cinema rather than theater. His first film, Darb al-Mahabil (Fools’ Alley, 1954) was influenced by al-Suq al-Sawda’ (The Black Market, 1943), which Saleh had seen being filmed by director Kamel al-Tilmissani during his first year at university. The Black Market was set in a poor district of Cairo in the manner of director Kamal Selim’s al-Azima, but unlike al­Azima, this time there was no happy resolution at the hands of an enlight­ened pasha. Instead, the people confronted the greedy merchants and emerged victorious. With this setting in mind, Saleh collaborated with Naguib Mahfouz, in his first work for cinema, to create a film which was outside the ordinary in every respect. Although awarded the National Prize for Directing in recognition of its social commentary Fools’ Alley was badly received by both critics and public.

Saleh then made no films for seven years, until 1962, when he directed Sira’a al-Abtal (Conflict of Heroes), relating the cholera epidemic of the 1940s to the effects of British occupation. Over the years, he made three more films, The Rebels, based on a story by journalist Salah Hafiz; Yawmiyat Na’ib fil-Aryaf (Diary of a Country Prosecutor, 1968) from a novel by Tawfik al-Hakim; and al-Sayyid al-Bulti (Mr Bulti, 1969) from a story by Saleh Mursi.

He then moved to Syria for four years, where he made his masterpiece, The Dupes, written by Palestinian author Ghassan Kanafani about the tragedy of the Palestinian diaspora.

In 1973, Saleh moved to Iraq, directing his last film, The Long Days, about Saddam Husayn’s revolutionary youth. He now lives in Cairo. – Cineplot

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Atef Salem, Director, Egypt

Salem was born on 23 July, 1927 in Sudan, where his father was serving as an officer in the Egyptian Army. He graduated from the faculty of applied arts of Cairo University.

The young Atef Salem was introduced to the professional world of cinema literally through a back door, at Studio Nassibian on Faggala Street. He befriended the studios guard, one Amm Gharib, who would allow him to slip in and watch the shooting of films. Thus, he was hiding in the shadows, watching the filming of the classic Intisar Al-Shabab (Youth’s Victory) in 1940, which starred singer and musician Farid Al-Atrash, his sister Asmahan, comedian Hassan Fayeq and the grande dame of Egyptian theatre Fatma Rushdi.

And it was Amm Gharib who gave Salem his first piece of professional advice: “If you really want to enter the world of cinema you should meet Ahmed Galal.” Galal had founded his own studio, Studio Galal, establishing himself as one of the major players in the industry.

The young Atef Salem buttonholed Ahmed Galal in the elevator to his office and introduced himself. Galal, impressed by the young man’s eagerness and sincerity, appointed Salem as second assistant director on Magda starring the much lauded actress (and Galal’s wife) Marie Queenie.

That was in 1944. Magda launched Salem’s cinematic career and he went on to assist Ahmed Badrakhan, Henri Barakat and Helmi Rafla. It is to Galal and Badrakhan, however, he later recalled, that he was most indebted.

In 1953 Salem directed his first film, Al- Hirman (Deprivation), starring the child prodigy Fayruz. The film was innovative, with 70 per cent of the scenes shot in the open air, a departure from Egyptian films which at the time were studio bound. Salem went on to direct some 54 films.

Although his filmography is wideranging, his favourite genre remained the socio-drama. Indeed, many of the storylines of his films originated in the crime columns of Egypt’s daily newspapers. Starring Farid Shawqi and Huda Sultan, Ga’aluni Mugriman (They Made A Criminal of Me, 1954) caused much controversy when it was released and led to the promulgation of a law removing first offences from the criminal record. It also won Salem the state award for directing and LE500.

Three of his films were written by Naguib Mahfouz: Ga’aluni Mugriman , Al-Namrud, and Ihna Al-Talamdha (We Are The Students).

Many of Salem’s films have become classics of Egyptian cinema, including Sira’ Fil-Nil (Struggle on the Nile), Ayyamna Al- Hilwa (Our Happy Days), Ayna Aqli (Where is My Mind?), Yawm Min Umri (A Day of My Life), Wa Mada Qitar Al-Umr (And Life Went By), Wa Da’ Al-Umr Ya Waladi (And Life Was Lost My Son), Al- Hafid (The Grandson), and Al-Nimr Al- Aswad (Black Tiger). He also directed historical dramas — Al-Mamalik (The Mamlukes) and Khan Al-Khalili.

In Qahir Al-Dhalam (Victor Over Darkness), based Taha Hussein’s autobiography, Salem introduced actor Mahmoud Yassin in the challenging role of the blind author. In Umm Al-Arousa (Mother of the Bride) (1963), arguably his most popular film after Ga’aluni Mugriman, Salem dared to introduce a by then aging Emad Hamdi in the role of the father of the bride. Hamdi had long been Egyptian cinema’s favourite hero. His success in such a new role was repeated years later when, in the mid- seventies, Salem cast a similarly aging Farid Shawqi in Wa Mada Qitar Al-Umr.

The director promoted many young talents and gave them starring roles — Zubaida Tharwat, Nabila Ebeid (to whom he was married at one point), Mahmoud Abdel-Aziz (whom he introduced to the cinema in Al-Hafid), Laila Elwi, Fardos Abdel-Hamid, Ihab Nafie, Hala Fouad, Mustafa Fahmi and Wafaa Salem among them.

Salem suffered a stroke three years ago while shooting his last film Fares Dahr Al-Khayl (Bare-Back Knight). He returned to the studio months later — in a wheel chair — determined to finish the film. And he did.

Fares Dahr Al-Khayl recounts the story of a British war widow travelling to Al-Alamein in search of her husband’s grave. Unable to locate it she begins a long journey to discover his fate, her only clue being his nick-name, the bare-back knight. The film has been aired on several Arab channels and will soon be released on Egyptian film and television screens.

Salem received many prizes throughout his career including a golden medal for his film on the Yemen Revolution and another for his film on the High Dam. Fares Dahr Al-Khayl won an award at this year’s Cairo Radio and Television Festival and he has been an honouree of the Cairo International Film Festival.

Despite the awards and prizes Salem spent the last years of his life in growing obscurity. Following press reports publicising the problems he faced paying hospital bills the prime minister’s office offered that the state foot a large percentage of the bill. During the final months of his life he had few visitors apart from his granddaughter and her husband. His masterpieces, however, will always be remembered by devotees of Egyptian cinema. – Al Ahraam

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Atef El-Tayeb, Director, Egypt

BIO
Hardly 48 years old, Tayeb died after a bypass heart surgery— that caused a hemorrhage. Shortly before his death, he just completed his latest film, Jabr al Khawater [Consolation]. During the International Egyptian Film Festival last year, Tayeb was awarded a best director prize for his film Layla Sakhina [Hot Night].

Along with several of his fellow directors, Tayeb attempted a renewal in Egyptian cinema, utilizing present contributions, artistic traditions and realistic issues. In translating this approach, he started like many others by making short documentary films and then moved toward fiction pictures. He started his with Al Ghira al Katila [Deadly Jealousy] , and then Sawak al Autobis [the Bus Driver], a work that attracted the attention of audiences and critics, and established him as one of the great Egyptian directors.

Sawak al Autobis ushered the onset of neo-realism, paving the way for a new generation of directors to renew Egyptian cinema. Sawak al Autobis depicts the tribulations of an Egyptian family, caught unprepared in dealing with the effects of “Egypt’s open door policy,” the move from a state controlled economy to economic liberalization during the 1970’s and 1980’s. The members of this family are engrossed with their own interests, bypassing others and ridding themselves of any family or moral commitment that may stand in the way of achieving their goals. Deviating from this culture of Infitah, the Arabic term for the “open door policy,” was the eldest son, who chose to stand by his sick father and struggle to save the factory from being put up for foreclosure. Whether in terms of direction or technicalities, or in terms of choosing the subject and showing concern with the social problems, the critics chose Sawak al Autobis as one of the ten best films produced after the 1952 revolution, according to director Radwan al Kashif. Sawak al Autobis has earned several Egyptian awards and the First Award in the Delhi Festival.

Tayeb did not shun politics, even the most controversial topics such as political prisons, the innocent, and those sought and pursued by government on false grounds. In Al Bar’i [The Innocent], the conscript (Ahmad Zaki) uncovers a lie—the deception used by the government in the prison to mobilize conscripts and instigate them to torture prisoners , told that they are enemies of the nation. This theme led the Egyptian authorities first to ban the film and then to delete the last part of it.

With the loss of Atef al Tayeb, many Arabs seem to have a date with sorrow: not only do they lose a great director, but they are about to lose essential freedoms, clearly evident in the many bills debated in the Egyptian Parliament censoring films and directors.- Al Jadid

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Anwar Wagdi, Director, Actor, Egypt

Anwar was born in the Cairo district of El Daher, Cairo. He was of Syrian descent. His father, Yehia Wagdy El-Fattal, immigrated to Egypt from Syria with his family in the 19th century for economic reasons.[citation needed] Anwar’s Egyptian mother, Muhiba El-Rikaby, was from Cairo.Anwar grew up very poor and was known for his extraordinary ambition and desire to amass wealth. Anwar Wagdy was married to Egyptian actresses Elham Hussein, Leila Mourad (three times), and Leila Fawzy. He died at 51 in Sweden while seeking treatment of polycystic kidney disease.

Anwar Wagdy began his acting career as an extra in 1922 in the Youssef Wahbi Theatre Company’s production of Julius Caesar. He quickly leaped to stardom and played leading roles in and/or directed 92 Egyptian films between the 1932 and 1955. He achieved particular success partnering with his wife, Egyptian legend Leila Mourad.

Youssef Wahbi directed his first film: “Defense” in 1934 and called “Anwar Wagdy” to take part in this film with him. After the failure of a film caused some financial problems for Youssef Wahbi and producer, which resulted in Anwar to join the National Force Theater, which was founded in 1935. Anwar Wagdi found that cinema is more suited to his talent and more in tune with its aspirations because of its popularity and its ability to reach a wider audience.

Throughout that period, he made “Wings of the Desert”, in 1939. Anwar Wagdy became a star, as directors of the exploitation of its looks handsome and soft features in the provision of the roles of the rich aristocrat indifferent to any symbol of evil. And grandfather established his production company “films Nations”, and produced, directed and acted in a number of films together with his wife Laila Murad, whom he married while filming the first: “The following are the poor girl.” – wikipedia

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Youssef Wahby, Director, Actor, Egypt

Youssef Wahbi (Arabic: يوسف وهبي‎) (July 14, 1898 – October 17, 1982) was an Egyptian stage and film actor and director, a leading star of the 1930s and ‘40s and was one of the most prominent arab stage actors of any era. He was born to a high state official in Egypt but renounced his family’s wealth and travelled to Rome in the 1920s to study theatre. Besides his stage work, he acted in about 50 films, starting with Awlad al-Zawat (Sons of Aristocrats; 1932) to “Iskanderiya… lih?” (Alexandria… Why?, 1978). He died, sick with arthritis and with a fractured pelvis, survived by his wife.

Youssef Wahbi was and still is one of the greatest actors and directors of the Cinema of Egypt of all time. He started in the Golden Age of the Egyptian Cinema from 1932 till he died in Cairo, Egypt at the age of 84 on 1982. Even though he came from a very rich family he concentrated all his career and life to the Film Industry.

Mr. Youssef Wahby also wrote several plays which were translated into many languages due to his fluency in English, French, Italian along with his native Arabic tongue. He played many roles that were different and unusual to both Egyptian film and plays. He once played the Devil and he later on wanted to play Muhammad but the media and the Al-Azhar University opposed to the idea and he was forbidden to do it.

He is the most respected and loved artist of all time in the Cinema of Egypt and several French and English companies have tried to save his movies by republishing them again. – Wikipedia

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Mahmoud Zulfikar, Director, Egypt

Mahmoud Zulfikar ( February 18 1914 – May 22 1970 -), was an actor and director, born in Tanta Egypt. He obtained a diploma in architecture in 1935. He was a brother of actor Salah Zulfikar and director Ezzeddine Zulfiqar .

Zulfikar worked as an engineer in the design department at the Ministry of Works, he moved into the film industry and soon began making feature films. He became a prolific filmmaker and his films oftn starred his older brother Salah Zulfikar. He married actress Aziza Amir and married Mary, Fakhr al-Din in 1952 – Wikpedia (translated)

The Africa Film Project

almost 3 years ago

PROFILE

Ezzel Dine Zulficar, Director, Actor

BIO
Zulficar was born in Cairo, Egypt. As a child, Zulficar was a prodigy. He received a scholarship and studied astronomy. He loved reading, which is what had helped him succeed. He graduated from the military faculty and later became a lieutenant. Although he was doing well in his military career, he decided to start directing. He was influenced by his brother, who was a screenwriter. He started as director Mohamed Abdel Jawad’s assistant, but in 1947, he directed his first movie, Aseer al-Zalam (أسير الظلام, “Prisoner of Darkness”). One of his most successful movies as a director was Rud Qalby (رُدّ قلبي, “Return My Heart”) which was featured for six weeks in Cairo’s cinemas.

In 1947, Zulficar started a production company with the legendary Egyptian actress, Faten Hamama, who was his wife then. He also acted in Khulud (خُلود, “Immortality”) along with Hamama. As a writer he was quite successful. He wrote scripts and stories for almost 30 movies. His last work was the direction and scriptwriting for the movie Maw’ed Fi al-Borj (موعد في البُرج, “Meeting at the Tower”, 1963). Zulficar died on July 1963.

Zulficar met Faten Hamama while filming the Abu Zayd al-Hilali movie in 1947, which he directed. The two fell in love and married each other. The couple had a daughter, Nadia Zulficar. Their marriage would only last for seven years, as the couple divorced in 1954. The two remained friends, and Hamama even acted in his movies after the divorce. – Wikipedia

Joe Wakeman

almost 3 years ago

This should be the auteur photo for the Dziga Vertov Group^

Owen Sound

almost 3 years ago

New still suggestion for Don’t Bother To Knock