MUBI brings you a great new film every day.  Start your 7-day free trial today!
All Topics  »

What's your favorite country (by cinematical standards)

Nikyatu

over 4 years ago

Korea and Mexico — most definitely. US films are mostly rip offs of foreign films anyway.

Alain Leun

over 4 years ago

La France ou Les Etats-Unis.Je ne suis pas sure.

Rich Uncle Skeleton

over 4 years ago

“US films are mostly rip offs of foreign films anyway.”

lol, what? care to explain?

Fandori​n-san

over 4 years ago

“US films are mostly rip offs of foreign films anyway.”

very generalized statement, that wouldn’t have had any value if said ten years ago. you can’t look at the past nine years and ignore 80 years of film making

Glemaud

over 4 years ago

America
France
Italy
(of course)

Brazil
Taiwan
Mexico
Turkey
Greece

I like everything really, I don’t discriminate.

Christy Brinkle​y

over 4 years ago

U.S.A
France
Denmark
Spain
Germany
Russia

banal1

over 4 years ago

U.S. (one contributing factor – all the Germans who came here, bringing Expressionism to Hollywood)
France
Italy
Germany

Omitted Japan due to blind spot/bias – i don’t like films set in feudal Japan or samurais. don’t like most westerns either.

banal1

over 4 years ago

Is CINEMATICAL a word?

quop

over 4 years ago

France and Japan are close; depending on the mood the U.S. is also. Regardless of mood, the U.S. isn’t far behind at all.

siriusd​an

over 4 years ago

im inclined to say Hong Kong (china) because of Wong Kar Wai but truth be told i terribly enjoy Italian cinema followed closely by Iranian films.

Bob Stutsman

over 4 years ago

Hey guys, isn’t this a bit shameless considering the auteurs film world cup thing? Well, for me Australia for obvious reasons – so there!

psychon​appy

over 4 years ago

Scandinavia (can’t pick one)
France
USA
Canada (always piques my interest)

I find Japanese cinema dreadfully boring.

A Gonzale​z

over 4 years ago

I don’t think it gets any better than French cinema.

Mikel Guillen

over 4 years ago

1 France
2 Germany
3 Japan
4 Italy

Rich Uncle Skeleton

over 4 years ago

@Banal1

well, it’s almost an adverb. but to answer your question, no.

for some reason a lot of posters on this site have trouble with adjectives, I’ve never seen anything like it.

Rüdiger Tomczak

over 4 years ago

Japan, the 30s and 50s
USA
France
India
Canada (especially Quebec)
China (30s and 40s)
Mexico (the 40s)
Germany

Christo​pher Smail

over 4 years ago

Winner- France
Runners Up- Sweden, USA, Japan

rishi goswami

over 4 years ago

france

Myra

over 4 years ago

We’re addressing this competitively in the form of The Auteurs World Cup, so check out the selections made by team managers for each country/region here.

sensei

over 4 years ago

In order of preference

Japan
China/Taiwan/Hong Kong
Korea
France
Sweden
Spain
Italy
Iran
Russia
Brazil
India
Mexico
Argentina……………….

Mayukh

over 4 years ago

Spain
Sweden
Japan
Italy

sitenoi​se

over 4 years ago

Looking backward – Japan
Looking forward – China

Jim W

over 4 years ago

America has the best film makers, but also some of the worst.

Outside of the US, I’d say France. I love how they make films for the art value and not the money.

kaztunk

over 4 years ago

Love the rich, diverse world of cinema, but my heart is in the USA. Why? Partially nostalgia. No movies will ever effect me on an emotional level like the ones that I watched as a child. But even later in life I find that Hollywood has made some of my favorite films. They’ve also created a simplistic, but powerful template upon which to riff off of. Without the classic western, would we have The Seven Samurai? Without Casablanca, would we have Breathless? Without Dracula, would we have Hour Of The Wolf?

Edwin N

over 4 years ago

French Cinema and Japanese cinema have the most exciting list of film movements,critics and filmmakers.
They also have the best quality of films.

scorpio​rising

over 4 years ago

IRAN. Period.

They have Forough Farrokhzad (The House Is Black), Abbas Kiarostami (Taste of Cherry), Jafar Panahi (Crimson Gold), Mohsen Makmahlbaf (Kandahar), Majid Majidi (Children of Heaven), Samira Makhmalbaf (The Apple) and Marzieh Meshkini (The Day I Became a Woman).

I rest my case.

Edwin N

over 4 years ago

No need for agressive behavior, Scorpiorising. “IRAN.Period” and “I rest my case” showcases you have no true arguments about what you said.Why don’t you calm down? Did anybody “assault” you for saying Iranian cinema is the best?

scorpio​rising

over 4 years ago

Oh, I wasn’t trying to be aggressive or offensive there. And I wasn’t making any true arguments. The directors and films that I just mentioned, I hope, were self-explanatory.

I just placed the “period” there to show that I don’t plan to add any more of my favorite countries, in regards to films.

Dimitri​s Psachos

over 4 years ago

i think Scorpiorising wanted to give a food for thought that not always Japan,France,U.S.A. or Italy are the most respected cinematic countries if one has the patience to search unknown lands as well and then they will realize that none has to be established in movements or distributed films to become famous…

but i guess he was just a bit more excited,hehe.

because personally,i can easily say it’s Greek or U.S. cinema since i’ve watched more films from these countries…

richmon​dhill

over 4 years ago

For an all-too-brief period in the 1940s, I’ll strike out and say England and more specifically the films to have emerged from J Arthur Rank under the Independent Producers banner, witness: The Archers – The Red Shoes, A Matter of Life and Death, I Know Where I’m Going, Black Narcissus, The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp; Cineguild – Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, Brief Encounter; Olivier – Henry V, Hamlet, etc. All resolutely British in character and the nearest we’ve come to a national cinema but hardly displaying the ‘little island’ mentality that beset much future production. Add-in some of the output from London Films and Ealing Studios (again bankrolled by Rank) – Kind Hearts and Coronets, Whisky Galore! et al – from this period, and you have a short but rich harvest (and an important stream of Criterion films too).

Other than the above, I’d plump for post-war Italian cinema through to the seventies (not sure where I’d cinematically go after that, probably on tour!)