We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. Click here for more information.
AcceptReject
Photo of Carole Roussopoulos
Photo of Carole Roussopoulos

Carole Roussopoulos

[Nicole Brenez on Carole Roussopoulos]: Carole Roussopoulos’s last project was a film dedicated to Delphine Seyrig, who passed away in 1990. Roussopoulos herself died in 2009, leaving the film unfinished.

Available to Watch

Show all (6)

    BE PRETTY AND SHUT UP!

    Delphine Seyrig France, 1976

    Combative and essential, Delphine Seyrig’s rarely-seen interviews with a dynamic group of actresses—including Jane Fonda and Maria Schneider—have an immediate, unpolished aesthetic that strips off the glamorous veneer of mainstream cinema, exposing the industry’s rampant sexism and discrimination.

    More info

    JUST DON'T FUCK

    Carole Roussopoulos France, 1971

    Courageously made at a time when abortion was illegal in France, this video re-appropriates the structure of conservative TV news. By capturing women’s rights protests alongside a clandestine abortion, Roussopoulos renders such procedures not as isolated incidents but rather a collective exigency.

    MASO AND MISO GO BOATING

    Carole Roussopoulos, Delphine Seyrig, Ioana Wieder, Nadja Ringart France, 1976

    Bearing witness to the unabashed misogyny in 1970s France, this documentary irreverently distorts a TV broadcast to reveal the appalling and absurd extremes of systemic patriarchal prejudice. Through playful means, four women filmmakers—Les Insoumuses—make us laugh at a situation worth crying over.

    F.H.A.R.

    Carole Roussopoulos France, 1971

    Armed with a portable video camera, Carole Roussopoulos intimately seizes the radical passion and anger at a historical assembly of F.H.A.R.—an organization of radical lesbian and gay activists. The unapologetic resolve to overturn heteronormative, bourgeois values is at once rousing and enduring.

    S.C.U.M. MANIFESTO 1967

    Carole Roussopoulos, Delphine Seyrig France, 1976

    Made in response to the unavailability of the monumental “S.C.U.M. Manifesto” in France, this video work affirms the medium’s role in preserving feminist thoughts. The resilience expressed by the physical act of transcribing Valerie Solanas’ text subverts images of state violence seen on a small TV.

Director

Cinematographer

Editor

Sound

Actor

Self