MUBI brings you a great new film every day.  Start your 7-day free trial today!
W240

Kim Novak

Cast

“I loved acting, which was never about money, the fame. It was about a search for meaning. It was painful.”

 

Biography

Kim Novak was among Hollywood’s most enigmatic sex symbols of the ‘50s and early ’60s. Blonde and beautiful, she exuded a daunting intellectual chilliness and an underlying passionate heat that made her especially alluring. One of the last of the studio-made stars, she rebelled against her “manufactured” image, struggling to be seen as more than just another brainless glamour gal. Novak brought to many of her roles a certain melancholic reluctance about freeing up her character’s sensuality. It seemed as if her beauty was a burden, not an asset.

She was born Marilyn Pauline Novak and raised in Chicago, the daughter of a Czech railroad man. Before she was discovered in Los Angeles by Columbia Pictures helmer Harry Cohn (who chose her as a replacement for his increasingly difficult and rebellious reigning screen goddess Rita Hayworth), Novak worked odd jobs that included sales clerk, elevator operator, and a spokesmodel for a refrigerator company. Cohn signed her to his studio… read more

Wall

Displaying 4 wall posts.
Picture of Robert Regan

Robert Regan

13Jan12

“I want to report a rape,” said Kim Novak, the legendary star of “Vertigo,” “Picnic,” and many other revered classics. “My body of work has been violated by ‘The Artist.’ This film took the Love Theme music from “Vertigo” and used the emotions it engenders as its own. Alfred Hitchcock and Jimmy Stewart can’t speak for themselves, but I can. It was our work that unconsciously or consciously evoked the memories and feelings to the audience that were used for the climax of ‘The Artist.’”

  • Picture of chanandre

    chanandre

    2Jan13

    i can't agree with her. two examples? godard and tarantino. there's more than meets the eye with the Herrmann track being used in the artist...i don't know what the big deal is and i happen to love Vertigo and the artist too...and it's not her body of work the theme song is not hers nor is Hitch's or Stewart's it's Herrmann's and they paid for the rights and used it, what's all the fuss? I've seen a film by gustav deutsch using shots of 40's and 50's leading ladies in a continuous loop, would she call that film 'rape' too? for heaven's sake!

  • Picture of Robert Regan

    Robert Regan

    2Jan13

    I think she overstated her case, Andre, but she's even older than I am. I do feel, however, that The Artist is a silent movie for people who don't like silent movies. On the other hand, there are a lot of people I respect who liked it, so maybe I'm getting funny.

  • Picture of chanandre

    chanandre

    2Jan13

    I mean her sentence did break my heart, I love her as an actress I love Vertigo I love Herrmann but I don't think Hazanavicius was being mean or inconsiderate when he chose to use that particular theme song from 'Vertigo' when i hear that on the tear i felt shivers i mean S H I V E R S. Much has been said and much hate has been spewed on that subject i don't mean to start a feud against you or Kim or The Artist detractors they all have their reasons but rape is too strong a word no? and 'body of work' its one theme song from a bit of one of her films, hardly 'body' don't you agree?. I love silent films (as you know - altho I'm far from being an authority such as yourself that being said i'm 28 and you're what 50 so there's that too...). Many a film critics have said that '(...) The Artist is a silent movie for people who don't like silent movies'. I don't get that at all and I see a few silent films per year and i did like - a lot too - this film. I just don't get why people did not like the movie, it's quite enjoyable, and it's a post post post-modernistic take on silent films, those aren't done anymore, outside the experimental, avant-garde, artsy world that is...and a mainstream film to be that bold it was like Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds - if you ask me - I liked it quite a lot, as a film-goer i felt the love and respect toward the silent film era, i liked it.

  • Picture of Robert Regan

    Robert Regan

    2Jan13

    Andre, not only did the admirable Ms Novak overstate her case, but I think I may have spoken too harshly on this matter. Unlike some people online, I do try to respect the views and feelings of others. It may be time for me to take another look at The Artist. And by the way, I wish I were fifty again! Stay well. Bob

  • Picture of chanandre

    chanandre

    2Jan13

    A bit more than an overstatement. I do get her point though and she must be tired of not havng decent roles for what 20-30-40 years? it's a shame what Hollywood does to its leading ladies is it not? but still if one takes that into account it's a bit too much no? and i love her! as do i. i don't like to fight such for the kicks of it. i might argue but all with the utmost humanity (i try to, am no angel though...). Maybe it is come your b-day purchase it on BD or you could wait for a another screening. How's NYC vis-à-vis reprises? Are there theatre chains that show older films? besides cinematheques or film art-house theatres? i MEAN it's a huge city is it not? I don't have the faintest idea what kind of films you get up there, particularly those so called 'world cinema' films you know? i thought you were late fifties or early sixties but as i'm a perfect gentlemen i went for the 'give him less years' rather than the other way around....but you caught my drift right? you too stay well. André. (i like how you 'sign' your comments aha).

Picture of Howard Fritzson

Howard Fritzson

15Sep11

Who cares if she wasn't the worlds greatest actress. At her peak she had qualities that were eminently cinematic. She was a beauty, certainly, but under the surface there was a yearning and a disappointment and maybe a little sadness. You could feel this when she was on screen. She didn't have to act it. It was there. You could relate to it. The fact that she was so beautiful made it that much more fascinating. In "Picnic" surrounded by all those hams, she is radiantly natural. She seems to be doing the minimum but her person, her being floods the role.

Owen Sound and Anastasia like this

Picture of Sabrina Crews

Sabrina Crews

27May11

I had hoped to find "Pushover", a great noir, and Kim Novak's first role...

Elisa likes this

Picture of Ilhame Benboubker

Ilhame Benboubker

21Sep10

Jeanne Eagels ?