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Film of the day
  • THE WITCHES OF THE ORIENT

    Julien Faraut France, 2021

    Exclusive
    MUBI SPOTLIGHT

    Julian Faraut’s spellbinding documentary employs a mosaic of stunning materials to tell the story of a group of female factory workers turned Olympic champions. Reminiscent of Chris Marker’s essay films, this captivating portrait of postwar Japan is a treat for sports fans and cinephiles alike!

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  • THE GRADUATE

    Mike Nichols United States, 1967

    A true classic that still feels as fresh as ever, Mike Nichols’s prototypical coming-of-age drama pinpoints the desires and angst of a new generation about to enter adulthood. Dustin Hoffman and Anne Bancroft bring it to life, merging with their indelible characters to create new cinematic icons.

  • THE TROUBLE WITH BEING BORN

    Sandra Wollner Austria, 2020

    A MUBI Release
    THE NEW AUTEURS

    Pinocchio and A.I.’s exploration of the desire to create artificial life is taken to boldly provocative lengths in Sandra Wollner’s incisive and unsettling modern fable. Told with cut-glass precision and eerie subjectivity, The Trouble with Being Born plumbs the darkest depths of the uncanny valley.

  • 025 SUNSET RED

    Laida Lertxundi United States, 2016

    Exclusive
    LANDSCAPE PLUS: THE
    FILMS OF LAIDA LERTXUNDI

    The enigmatic red that soaks through Laida Lertxundi’s short reifies the elusive act of political and personal remembrance. The imprints the director’s familial history with Communist organizing have left on her art practice are felt in the leaps between time, space, and audiovisual experimentation.

  • AUTOFICTION

    Laida Lertxundi Spain, 2020

    Fusing the personal and the collective, Laida Lertxundi’s quietly radical 16mm short links women’s private preoccupations to larger socio-political shifts. At once restless and languid, sunny Los Angeles and its vibrant multiculturalism are concretized by heartfelt anecdotes in English and Spanish.

  • THY KINGDOM COME

    Eugene Richards United States, 2018

    BEYOND THE WONDER:
    TERRENCE MALICK EXPANDED

    What served as background texture in Terrence Malick’s To the Wonder is foregrounded in this lyrical companion piece, assembled from unused footage. Expanding on Javier Bardem’s supporting role, Thy Kingdom Come blurs fiction and reality for a tender portrait of the feature’s small Oklahoma town.

  • TO THE WONDER

    Terrence Malick United States, 2012

    A mini-DV prologue announces Terrence Malick’s break with the past in his first contemporary feature, the ineffable To the Wonder. Starring Ben Affleck and a magnificent Olga Kurylenko, this impressionistic masterwork is a sensual and evocative portrait of a relationship coming apart at the seams.

  • JEANNETTE: THE CHILDHOOD OF JOAN OF ARC

    Bruno Dumont France, 2017

    Who else but Bruno Dumont to take us on a musical journey through the religious awakening of Joan of Arc? Developing his own style of electro-rock opera, the mutable French auteur delivers a cinematic feast that, in its stylistic exuberance, forges a unique path to spiritual profundity.

  • SWEET THING

    Alexandre Rockwell United States, 2020

    Described by Quentin Tarantino as one of the most powerful films of recent years, this poetic tale of childhood friendship is the latest from indie icon Alexandre Rockwell. Shot on a vivid assortment of color and black & white film stocks, Sweet Thing is a soulful hymn to hope and resilience.

  • ACCIDENTAL LUXURIANCE OF THE TRANSLUCENT WATERY REBUS

    Dalibor Baric Croatia, 2020

    A MUBI Release
    UNDISCOVERED

    Exploding the possibilities of animation and genre, Dalibor Barić’s dazzling debut dances from noir to sci-fi, from Philip K. Dick to Tarkovsky with philosophical abandon. Through a vivid array of technical effects, this hyper-sensory rush punches a hole in the fabric of nostalgia and reality.

  • PILOT PIRX'S INQUEST

    Marek Piestrak Soviet Union, 1979

    Adapted from a short story by Stanisław Lem, Pilot Pirx’s Inquest takes a hard sci-fi approach to its interrogation of what it means to be human. With an endearing tension between its 1970s brutalist design and futurist ideas, it makes for a fascinating, Twilight Zone-esque inquiry into A.I. ethics.

  • WINTER'S NIGHT

    Jang Woo-jin South Korea, 2018

    Set against the snowy landscape of Chuncheon, Jang Woo-jin’s nocturnal rumination on love and midlife dissatisfaction deftly alternates between sober contemplation and magical realism. Soju-soaked conversations conjure up, not only the ghosts of the past, but also preoccupations about the future.

  • ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK

    John Carpenter United States, 1981

    John Carpenter’s cult classic epic plunges his muse Kurt Russell into an expressionist New York seemingly stuck in eternal night. The iconic presences of Lee Van Cleef and Ernest Borgnine, combined with peerless widescreen camerawork, shape this into a neo-western with an anti-authoritarian edge.

  • THE FOG

    John Carpenter United States, 1980

    After the unexpected success of Halloween, cult auteur John Carpenter kicked off the ‘80s with The Fog. This spooky-silly California ghost tale is transformed by Carpenter’s anamorphic widescreen images into something densely ethereal and rich in macabre atmosphere.

  • BERLIN ALEXANDERPLATZ

    Burhan Qurbani Germany, 2020

    This thrilling reimagining of the literary classic paints a vividly modern portrait of the German capital and its reality for immigrants. With a riveting performance by Welket Bungué, Berlin Alexanderplatz moves with shark-like menace through the sultry fluorescence of the city’s underworld.

  • BLUE

    Apichatpong Weerasethakul France, 2018

    Thai master Apichatpong Weerasethakul has long been fascinated by the liminal spaces between wakefulness and dreams. Over a sleepless night in the jungle, he fashions a phantasmagorical miniature from a theatrical illusion, sparking a nebulous haze of spiritual anguish that touches the sublime.

  • HOSPITAL OF TRANSFIGURATION

    Edward Żebrowski Poland, 1979

    While best known as a visionary futurologist, Stanisław Lem didn’t just look to the stars. This adaptation of his first novel uses the microcosm of a sanatorium to allegorize 1930s Poland, before the arrival of the Nazi machine elucidates the sheer inadequacy of metaphor in the face of atrocity.

  • DEAR SON

    Mohamed Ben Attia Tunisia, 2018

    PRIVATE FACES: A
    MOHAMED BEN ATTIA DOUBLE BILL

    Mohammad Ben Attia’s second feature, once again co-produced by the Dardenne brothers, is a compassionate portrait of a family’s seemingly inexplicable loss. Anchored by a remarkable lead performance from Mohamed Dhrif, Dear Son confirms the emergence of a major new voice in modern Tunisian cinema.

  • HEART

    Jeong Ga-young South Korea, 2019

    Already heralded as the female counterpart to Hong Sang-soo, Jeong Ga-young once again plays a director engaging in awkward confessionals in her hilariously irreverent meta-comedy. Heart cheekily defies the usual portrayals of women and romance, and doubles as an audacious reflection on filmmaking.

  • ANCHOR AND HOPE

    Carlos Marques-Marcet Spain, 2017

    Exclusive

    The story of an unconventional family set-up quirkily plays out on London’s picturesque canals. Spanish director Carlos Marques-Marcet reunites the two stars of 10,000km, alongside real-life mother-daughter duo Geraldine and Oona Chaplin, for this lesbian slice-of-life drama about starting a family.

  • MOMENTS LIKE THIS NEVER LAST

    Cheryl Dunn United States, 2020

    Exclusive
    PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST

    A graffiti artist and prolific photographer, Dash Snow used the streets of pre-9/11 NY as his canvas. Vividly capturing his decadent scene through intimate home movies and insider testimony, Cheryl Dunn’s beautifully edited portrait is at once a vital time-capsule and a spirited ode to outsider art.

  • MAELSTRÖM

    Denis Villeneuve Canada, 2000

    A COSMIC TRAJECTORY:
    EARLY FILMS BY DENIS VILLENEUVE

    Weaving a cosmically-charged web of connections from its privileged protagonist all the way to a talking fish, Denis Villeneuve’s boldness of vision took a giant leap with this dark, philosophical comedy. Prefiguring his later work on Enemy, Maelström is an early great from the blockbuster auteur.

  • LIEBELEI

    Max Ophüls Germany, 1933

    Before melancholic romantic Max Ophüls became a great itinerant director, making such classics as Letter from an Unknown Woman and La Ronde in different countries, he worked in his native Germany. That is, before the Nazis suppressed this richly tragic, densely romantic tale, recently resurrected.

  • 80,000 YEARS OLD

    Christelle Lheureux France, 2020

    A MUBI Release
    BRIEF ENCOUNTERS

    Floating between layers of reality and imagination, installation artist and director Christelle Lheureux’s spontaneous short makes inventive use of split screen. Through musings, memories and dreams, this account of a woman’s summer loneliness presents us not with resolutions but with possibilities.

  • L'INNOCENTE

    Luchino Visconti Italy, 1976

    The final film by Luchino Visconti (La terra trema, The Leopard) offers a welcome return to the resplendent period dramas that followed his neorealist period. Visconti was an aristocrat with Marxist tendencies, and L’innocente is a sublime critique of the immoral excesses of the upper classes.

  • THE FIRST LAP

    Kim Dae-hwan South Korea, 2017

    Kim Dae-hwan won the Best Emerging Director award at Locarno for this playful and moving drama. Steeped in the politics and societal expectations of South Korea, and with echoes of Hong Sang-soo’s formal ingenuity, The First Lap is a sharp portrait of young adulthood and stagnant relationships.

  • A FIELD IN ENGLAND

    Ben Wheatley United Kingdom, 2013

    Standing as an eccentric, unprecedented object in his filmography, Ben Wheatley (Sightseers, High-Rise) reaffirmed his position as a driving force in the UK’s independent film landscape with this audio-visual tour-de-force–a hallucinatory B&W period film! A beguiling film set in a bizarre field.

  • WAKE IN FRIGHT

    Ted Kotcheff Australia, 1971

    This classic of ’70s “Ozploitation” is a terrifying, oppressive descent to the heart of darkness that follows no rules but its own. Long thought lost, this unforgettable horror—veritably scorched by the heat of the sun—is now a rightful cult hit, with fans including Martin Scorsese and Nick Cave!

  • THERE IS NO EVIL

    Mohammad Rasoulof Iran, 2020

    A sharp criticism of the death penalty, Mohammad Rasoulof’s Golden Bear-winning latest film was secretly shot in defiance of his government, which considers his works to engage in propaganda against the regime. Overcoming any barriers, the Iranian auteur tells us a brave and impassioned moral tale.

  • SWEETGRASS

    Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Ilisa Barbash United States, 2009

    This breathtaking view of the American West revealed the groundbreaking vision of Lucien Castaing-Taylor & Ilisa Barbash from Harvard’s Sensory Ethnography Lab (Leviathan) through its visual and aural pleasures. Newly restored, Sweetgrass is one of the defining documentaries of this century.