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3.1
475 Ratings

Dear White People

Directed by Justin Simien
United States, 2014
Comedy, Drama

Synopsis

A satire about being a black face in a very white place. Dear White People follows the stories of four black students at an Ivy League college where a riot breaks out over a popular ‘African American’ themed party thrown by white students.

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Dear White People Directed by Justin Simien

Awards & Festivals

Sundance Film Festival

2014 | Winner: Special Jury Prize for Breakthrough Talent (U.S. Dramatic Competition)

Independent Spirit Awards

2015 | Winner: Best First Screenplay

2015 | Nominee: Best First Feature

Village Voice Film Poll

2014 | Nominee: Best First Feature

Indiewire Critics' Poll

2014 | Nominee: Best First Feature

Dear White People is a comedy explicit about the topic of race, peppered with casual asides like, “Don’t worry, the negro at the door isn’t going to rape you.” If it’s less focused than the righteous sketch humour of Hollywood Shuffle, it is still witty, and Simien’s visual style is smooth and accessible, with a warm mahogany grade and a grace to the structure of chapter intertitles and tableaux vivants.
July 10, 2015
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Just because Simien knows what he’s doing doesn’t mean it works, at least not entirely. Dear White People is less than the sum of its very polished parts – a first feature that’s just impressive enough to be frustrating.
July 10, 2015
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The trouble is that the level of debate in the film makes Winchester feel like such a bastion of racial hyper-awareness that you can’t believe such a plainly incendiary shindig would ever happen there… Still, Simien’s actors save the film from feeling like a lecture. At its best, it’s many lectures at once, wittily delivered, rarely in accord, and interrupting each other with raucous abandon.
July 09, 2015
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