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3.2
22 Ratings

Enemies Within

Ennemis intérieurs

Directed by Selim Azzazi
France, 2016
Drama, Short

Synopsis

During the 90s, Algerian terrorism reaches France. Two men. Two identities. One battle.

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Enemies Within Directed by Selim Azzazi

Awards & Festivals

Academy Awards

2017 | Nominee: Best Live Action Short Film

What are people saying?

  • Steve Pulaski's rating of the film Enemies Within

    A perfectly interwoven allegory with a premise that inspires suspense and rapid-fire dialog very naturally, Ennemis intérieurs does what the similarly minded, Oscar-nominated short Silent Nights does, but in a far less sentimental or preachy manner. It takes a sharp, timely look at an issue that raises awareness for both sides without ever pandering, but also presents us with an elegant drama/thriller as a result.

  • EdieEmm's rating of the film Enemies Within

    Important & timely contribution to the dialogue on systemic racism; Islamaphobia; immigration reform etc. Austere and harrowing, confined largely to a dim inter(rogation)viewing room. Still, couldn't help wishing it had been a play instead, it's tight crafting being a bit too distancing; too meticulous to be invisible. Could've been more raw. Still - brutal. The very definition of leaving a bitter taste...

  • Roland Nicolai Fanega's rating of the film Enemies Within

    Did everything 'Silent Nights' (one of the other 2017 Oscar nominated shorts) failed to do; It executed its socially relevant themes effectively, established its tone well, and it's just overall a better script. It's probably the most dialogue heavy out of all the shorts I've seen, and at times became very exhausting (could be because it was 11:30pm when I watched it). Still very enjoyable and well directed.

  • Eric Rucker's rating of the film Enemies Within

    A very important topic handled very well, but with the inherent vice common to too many French productions: the DP is so set on being perceived as "elegant" that it keeps poking us in the eye and serving their ego rather than the meaning of the film, forgetting that directors and DPs who vanish are the truly elegant ones, like Mike Leigh, Dick Pope, Robert Bresson . . . Still, a much-needed reflection on the subject.