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3.8
1,681 Ratings

Interiors

Directed by Woody Allen
United States, 1978
Drama

Synopsis

Three sisters (Diane Keaton, Mary Beth Hurt, Kristin Griffith) find their lives spinning out of control in the wake of their parents’ sudden, unexpected divorce, in Woody Allen’s homage to Ingmar Bergman.

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Interiors Directed by Woody Allen

Awards & Festivals

Academy Awards

1979 | 5 nominations including: Best Actress in a Leading Role

National Board of Review

1978 | Winner: Top Ten Films

BAFTA Awards

1979 | Winner: Best Supporting Actress

1979 | Nominee: Most Promising Newcomer to Leading Film Roles

Writers Guild of America

1979 | Nominee: Best Drama Written Directly for the Screen (Screen)

What are people saying?

  • Duncan Gray's rating of the film Interiors

    Allen has always been open about who he steals from—Bergman, Fellini, etc.—but his appeal has always been how those stolen elements chemically react to a comic who idolized Groucho Marx. So what happens when you (ambitiously) take all comedy away? Turns out it's pretty damn effective, even if stuck in the shadow of others. Note Allen's working class background and that the film's "vulgarian" is its warmest character.

  • José Neves's rating of the film Interiors

    Cinematography by Gordon Willis. A frame would be enough to make this a memorable film: when Geraldine Page first attempt to suicide, she falls in the solitude of her impressively refined living room. As an indoor by V. Hammershoi, the female figure is cut in a space, framing it with her intrinsic and restrained interior content. Secondly, rarely an actor reached a high dimension as Page does, literally volatile.

  • Joe Hackman's rating of the film Interiors

    Another phenomenal Woody Allen movie, this one explores the relationships between parents and their children, as well as the three sisters at the heart of the film. Interiors is about familial competitiveness, the lies we tell each other and ourselves, and the little ways in which we turn into our parents as we age. I loved it.

  • LoverofLeCinema's rating of the film Interiors

    Very well written and shot. The emotions here often times cut deep and are very complex. I just found the characters annoying and unlikable. I don't think Diane Keaton is a good actress when it comes to arguing, she always acts too theatrical and it pulls me out of the film. But overall, the tone and sadness of this film is gripping and will hold you, even if you never want to watch it again.

  • mjgildea's rating of the film Interiors

    I couldn't have appreciated Interiors until the night I saw it. Its a movie where every shot is its own photograph & every performance is an accomplishment. Admittedly, Interiors is the product of Allen being given the freedom to write a love letter to Ingmar Bergman & simultaneously making the black sheep of his career. For as just there as I was for most of this movie, the final 15 minutes completely crushed me.

  • Eleanor Abernathy's rating of the film Interiors

    i liked this movie...i find it interesting that it was one jump away from annie hall which i think is one of the most perfect comedies ever made and this film is the absolute opposite yet i think anyone can see a bit of themselves in these characters. it was slow without being boring. dramatic without being a tearjerker.

  • Dzimas's rating of the film Interiors

    Quite a departure from his usual fare. Interesting that he portrayed a gentile family in this cold and unforgiving film. Maureen Stapleton provided some much needed comic relief in the end, even if it was very hard to see how any of the sisters could reconcile their emotions with this second marriage or why the father so badly needed their approval. Clearly this was Geraldine Page's movie. She was excellent.

  • Mayukh Sen's rating of the film Interiors

    contrary to what john waters claims, this film still would've been as hilariously self-important if it was filmed in swedish. bergman comparisons aside, it's a pitiless wallow through misery with shallow symbolism (the earth mother wears red!).