For a better experience on MUBI, update your browser.
3.1
544 Ratings

It Comes at Night

Directed by Trey Edward Shults
United States, 2017
Horror, Mystery

Synopsis

A father will stop at nothing to protect his wife and son from a malevolent, mysterious presence terrorizing them right outside their doorstep.

This film is not currently playing on MUBI but 30 other great films are. See what's now showing
It Comes at Night Directed by Trey Edward Shults

Awards & Festivals

Camerimage

2017

Gotham Awards

2017 | Nominee: Breakthrough Actor

What are people saying?

  • Duncan Gray's rating of the film It Comes at Night

    Let it never be said that you can't end the world on a tiny budget. Mis-marketed as a horror movie, it suffers a bit from vagueness: a vague post-apocalyptic scenario and a vague "it" yielding a vague allegory—something about paranoia, something about American isolation, maybe something about race—that feels like a short film padded to a feature. I will say this, though: the last act is a fantastic payoff.

  • Igor Ramos's rating of the film It Comes at Night

    Shults follows "Krisha" with a sophomore film that also evokes feelings of paranoia and claustrophobia, and this time around it's not just one person facing a family meeting but two families on some kind of post-apocalyptic scenario. All the things left unanswered just made it even creepier. Another small-scale but effective work.

  • J. O.'s rating of the film It Comes at Night

    Psychological drama with some terror mis-marketed as a terrifying horror film. Sure the performances were okay, and the photography was quite nice, but the story was a paint-by-numbers. I predicted the ending as soon as the little boy is found sleeping in a room by himself. Nothing about this is fresh or new, but I'm always interested to see another crack at a psychological story during the apocalypse.

  • Matt Richards's rating of the film It Comes at Night

    Wow! This is really wall put together with a steady and gradual ratcheting of dread and paranoia that plays out in an easy to identify with family dynamic. Great performance across the board but the real strength is in it's playing for subtext and all of the things left unsaid.4 stars

  • Matthew Martens's rating of the film It Comes at Night

    It's hard, having seen it in a theater full of people stunned unto nonplussed whispers, bullshit-calling mockery, and pissed-off, refund-hungry invective, not to mention, and rue, the bait-and-switch of the film's marketing. Still, had those rubes rolled with it, they'd have found a simple, precise film about family, desire and disease, about borders and others, and it would have scared them, and broken their hearts.

  • Jason's rating of the film It Comes at Night

    As Shults already demonstrated in his debut, he has a fine sense for the nuances of interpersonal harmony / disharmony and the possibilities for estrangement inherent in human spaces. He has a good eye, and an interesting sensibility. That doesn't mean he can make a movie about the pointlessness of struggle and the meaninglessness of human existence particularly rewarding. I felt nothing beyond a kind of glum accord.

  • msmichel's rating of the film It Comes at Night

    Shults moves, from the 'family horror' of "Krisha" , closer to genre horror with this survivalist thriller that is a measure in both tension and confusion. Like his debut film it suffers from the comparison of what the audience expectation is versus the actual result and eventually succumbs to its own limitations. Mind you anything this adverse to convention in the local multiplex is worth trumpeting for.

  • HKFanatic's rating of the film It Comes at Night

    I can't blame a distributor for wanting to sell their product to the widest audience possible, but "It Comes at Night" is perhaps misleadingly marketed as a horror film. Its DNA is much closer to a movie like Jeff Nichols "Take Shelter" or even M. Night Shyamalan's "The Village," in which genre trappings are deployed merely as window dressing to tell a human drama about mistrust, paranoia, and adolescent awakening.