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4.0
262 Ratings

Kino Eye

Kinoglaz

Directed by Dziga Vertov
Soviet Union, 1924
Documentary, Silent, Avant-Garde

Synopsis

A cinematographic poem in which Dziga Vertov lays the foundation of his Kino-Eye principles, the film shows the incredible force of his theories, but also the beauty and energy of a society fresh from revolution, ready to face the challenges of a difficult future.

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Kino Eye Directed by Dziga Vertov

What are people saying?

  • Lynch/Fellini's rating of the film Kino Eye

    Essential Viewing- this film nicely contrasts Vertov's Man With a Movie Camera, in that where that film was about the Communist machine, this was about the working class proletarians.

  • Kamran's rating of the film Kino Eye

    A masterclass in film editing and the underrated little brother of Vertov's opus MAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA. Simply wonderful. 95/100 - Amazing.

  • EdieEmm's rating of the film Kino Eye

    "No more traditions chains shall bind us; arise ye slaves, no more in thrall!" The camera, freed from motives of profit & pandering, freed from the tyranny of human limitations, a modernist (futurist!) mechanical eye, capable of seeing the world beyond restricted perceptions of time & space, imparting the lessons necessary for the transition to the glorious proletarian/machine future! Rapturous experimental cinema.

  • Jason's rating of the film Kino Eye

    A grid of treatise beneath a shimmering slab of art all pertaining to the liberation of the eye in a brave new world of emancipatory (sigh, if only our kino man had known (although perhaps I am not stepping back far enough)) wonders.

  • ejonline's rating of the film Kino Eye

    Contrary to some other comments, I would not dismiss this as mere Soviet propaganda. Although the Young Pioneers are celebrated, Vertov also captured the uneasy feeling they created in some of the people they interacted with. In addition, there are many scenes of people struggling - it is not a worker's paradise by any stretch. In the end, it felt less like a cohesive film and more like a collection of shorts.

  • Loz Loory's rating of the film Kino Eye

    Genius editing sequences: reversing playback is a perfect way to show the "means of production" from which people were being separated. Amazing historical footage of the Russian population. The Revolution delivered instant famine, massacres, and corruption; no camera could hide how malnourished those kids and adults are. Loved the trench dining table! Loved the emphasis on increasing the literacy rate!

  • Ralph Melcher's rating of the film Kino Eye

    When viewing the staged images of all of these smiling marching children in the first half I couldn’t but imagine the tragedy, horror and famine to come. The precursor to Leni Reifenstahl’s ‘Triumph Of The Will’ and the prototype of all propaganda films to follow. Redeemed somewhat by the sheer humanity of the last reel and the creative editing.

  • Julia Lesmister's rating of the film Kino Eye

    For its time, it is certainly something to behold. On the other hand, its propaganda on too many levels. Unfortunately, I've always found the absence of diegetic sound discomforting. A silent film has to be pretty special for me to get over this loss, and this one just isn't. It is, however, subtly amusing, and technically brilliant, so there's that.

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