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Critics reviews
Prince of Darkness
John Carpenter United States, 1987
Despite the film’s intensely confined physical scope, the plot is ludicrously maximalist and patently nonsensical without attaching itself to the kind of strong central protagonist that Carpenter traditionally excels at… And yet that drawback should still be considered relatively minor: by any standard measure, Prince of Darkness is a hell of a film, and pitch-perfect Halloween-eve viewing. It remains, in both modern horror and Carpenter’s filmography, essential viewing.
October 30, 2017
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The movie’s melancholic romantic connection in the film’s early scenes seem to be emblematic of humanity’s failure to face the reality of our mortality. If love symbolizes our ability to connect with each other and our environment, it also reflects our need to accept its limits. The true horror of Prince of Darkness, as it is in many of Carpenter’s films, is the inevitably of humanity’s end. Just as the universe existed for eons before our existence, it will survive for eons after we’re gone.
October 13, 2016
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Above all, it’s Carpenter’s direction that dazzles and propels, clarifying through blocking and movement what the script leaves bewildering. Carpenter’s formal mastery has long elevated the material he chooses, but Prince of Darkness is the purest distillation of that formalism…
September 22, 2013
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While the dense significations of the script (credited to one “Martin Quatermass”) may get a bit thick in spots, Carpenter’s handsome ‘Scope images generally make the most of them, and some haunting poetic notions — such as video images from the future that appear as recurring dreams dreamt by the church’s inhabitants — figure effectively in the plot.
October 23, 1987
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