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Reichstag 9/11

Directed by Ken Jacobs
United States, 2016
Avant-Garde, Short

Synopsis

Obvious as the facts may be, we are all wonderfully free to “make up our own minds”. The images of Reichstag 9/11 are derived from eyewitness recordings on the web. Deception upon deception, this time optical.

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Reichstag 9/11 Directed by Ken Jacobs

Critics reviews

The program’s most intriguing draw is Reichstag 9/11, a 38-minute Eternalist collage of footage taken by New Yorkers on the day of the World Trade Center attack. In light of the implied comparison between September 11, 2001 and the 1933 Reichstag fire in Berlin—a disaster some historians have suggested was an inside job, designed to scapegoat the German Communist party and strengthen the newly established Third Reich—it’s the most provocatively and perplexingly named film Jacobs has directed.
January 10, 2017
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Ken Jacobs’s new work epitomizes what big-screen video projection is all about. Jacobs dares to turn the hellish attack on the World Trade Center, long seared into our brains, into a three-dimensional spectacle in which every unbearable image courts self-immolation. Crumbling, decomposing, shattering, fragmenting, disintegrating, dissolving, and melting, the pictures weep and bleed—into each other and beyond the edges of the frame.
January 02, 2017
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The pixels that make up the familiar footage of the disaster are wrenched and wretchedly rendered and exploded across the screen, like so much dust of the buildings that would later infect and even kill many New Yorkers. Only these pixels have proliferated in different ways, changing not only how we see and think about reported (and repeated) image violence, but infecting, as it were, the American culture at large to instigate what seems a permanent state of fear, anxiety, and vulnerability.
December 20, 2016
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