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3.7
816 Ratings

Sister

L'enfant d'en haut

Directed by Ursula Meier
Switzerland, 2012
Drama

Synopsis

A luxury ski resort in Switzerland. 12-year-old Simon lives in the industrial valley below, with his jobless sister. Every day, he takes the ski-lift to the opulent ski world above, stealing equipment from the rich tourists to resell to the local kids back down.

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Sister Directed by Ursula Meier

Awards & Festivals

Berlin International Film Festival

2012 | 2 wins including: Silver Bear

Locarno International Film Festival

2012

Independent Spirit Awards

2013 | Nominee: Best International Film

César Awards

2013 | Nominee: Most Promising Actor

What are people saying?

  • Matthew_Lucas's rating of the film Sister

    12 year old Simon spends his days stealing skis and other small items at a ski resort in the Alps to provide for himself and his mostly absent sister, who is raising him on her own. Director Ursula Meier explores their odd and unique relationship in this tender and often surprising film. A beautifully composed tale of a young man caught between childhood and adulthood, starved for affection in a harsh world.

  • Mark Garrett's rating of the film Sister

    Meier's central conceit is much more set in reality, but with the same kind of sensational aura surrounding it. Nevertheless, the pacing and careful build of SISTER is contemporary: addressing a ludicrous and all-complict nature of poverty. There's no sympathy in Lea Seydoux's eyes, only defiance and the need to survive, which bring about fuck-up after fuck-up, implying her own complicit nature. Very decent.

  • Matt Richards's rating of the film Sister

    Enjoyable, simple tale set against a stunning back-drop of family, belonging and learning to accept the hand life has dealt. The story centres on a young boy being forced into taking the parental role by hustling and stealing from tourists at a ski resort to buy food and support his off-the-tracks 'sister'. There is a simple twist that lends the film it's weight and the performances are all superb. 4 stars

  • Ouibonjour's rating of the film Sister

    What a beautiful final scene.

  • cin·aes·the·tic's rating of the film Sister

    The original title of the film is 'L'enfant d'en haut' ('The Child from Above'). That title works better for me, since to me the film is really from Simon's point of view. Louise is important, but only in relation to Simon. With the exception of a jarring twist, the plot itself is routine, but the film rewards the viewer's patience at the end. Kacey Mottet Klein and Léa Seydoux are both excellent in their roles.

  • Greg Shields's rating of the film Sister

    So many poor movies to watch, but few are accurate portrayals of the poor in Western Industrialized society. Even rarer of economic disparity. So full of tenderness, in this uneasy backdrop of mistakes and bad choices, this tension. Poverty is so common in our 1st world, it is nice to see it celebrated. (Honestly, I had forgotten the alternate meaning of Sissy, once 2nd nature to think.)

  • Shane Schenck's rating of the film Sister

    A reasonably entertaining movie. I loved the boys humorous yet nonchalant attitude. The boy, in this case, was more of an adult than his adult sister. The film also had beautiful scenery of the mountain scape. However, the film lacks in enjoyability. There are too many moments in this film where I felt unsure of what was happening and even in the end I felt the characters had little to no progress in the story line.

  • Nicky Borda's rating of the film Sister

    The ski mask gives Simon character because even though he covers his face, he is already never seen. Simon lives with his unactive twenty-something year old sister, Louise, who jumps from job to job and disappears with low life boys that mistreat her till she ends up back to ground zero in her one bedroom apartment with her little brother Simon. This film amazes me how a "young man" does so much for his age.