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3.8
297 Ratings

The Exiles

Directed by Kent MacKenzie
United States, 1961
Drama

Synopsis

Chronicling one night in the lives of young Native American men and women living in the Bunker Hill district of Los Angeles, the film follows a group of exiles—arrivals from the Southwest reservations—as they flirt, drink, party, fight, and dance.

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The Exiles Directed by Kent MacKenzie

What are people saying?

  • msmichel's rating of the film The Exiles

    'Let's do it again tonight'. Classic American indie that was almost lost to history until its restoration by UCLA and Milestone Films. A group of young native Americans relocated to L.A. are torn between trying to create a life for themselves there and keeping their traditions and identity. The charm of the film is making the story so identifiable and engaging creating a full empathy and connection.

  • Miggy Angel's rating of the film The Exiles

    tragic. painful to watch. post-genocide trauma SHOULD hurt to watch. cut adrift from presence, land, history, culture, the staged scenes reinforcing the enacting of a script they didn't author, costumes covering their crowns & coronas, suffocated by the eraser of americana. the film is complicit in the denial of genocide. the jukebox lied. "Either one must remain terrified or become terrifying." - Franz Fanon

  • Zac Weber's rating of the film The Exiles

    A refreshing, cliche-free focus on Native Americans in contemporary society. The neon-kissed black and white cinematography produces a buzz we often associate with L.A. noir and the documentary-like structure adds a sense of authenticity to the environments and characters.

  • rcrespin's rating of the film The Exiles

    This is a great film, a great document of a city no longer around. Watch it and look for it on DVD so you can revisit as often as you can. Such a Joy!!

  • Chris's rating of the film The Exiles

    Liked this one a lot. It stands as a fascinating and somewhat bleak document of a culture that is either underrepresented or (more often than not) misrepresented in media. At the same time, the movie serves as a compelling neo-realist portrait of Los Angeles during a period that is far removed from the contemporary experience, but still feels very familiar in many ways.

  • Eric Rucker's rating of the film The Exiles

    I don't know what to say: I was so touched by this movie, so intrigued, so happy and curious to get to know our brothers and sisters who were here before us. Heartbreaking that our parents did what they did to their parents. I love the gentle wordless sensibility and humor. The few more or less Native American films I've seen put me in mind of Bill Forsyth's gentle wordless humanism and humor, which deeply moves me.

  • Quattro's rating of the film The Exiles

    A portrayal so sincere, so moving. And it's a pleasure to watch, it could really be filmed just yesterday. I think I missed a bunch of lines because of the absence of subtitles, but the substance hit the same. I loved the use of the voice-over, and the «nocturnal» mood that fills each and every frame. Ah, and the title is perfect, too. Great Cinema. One of those hidden pearls I expect to discover on MUBI. Thank you!

  • Marco Bevilacqua's rating of the film The Exiles

    I like the anthroplogical approach to an old culture in a modern setting. This film presents the scenes in a natural way, like a documentary. It is a real and honest attempt to explain the difficulty native American people have in integrating in western culture, and in many ways this can be considered a neo-realistic film.